No CARES COVID-19 cash for Vigo Well being Dept? | Native Information

The Vigo County Ministry of Health does not have the resources to continue its COVID-19 response after December 31, according to a notice sent to county officials.

Funding from the CARES act was used for contact tracing and contract nurses to administer the COVID vaccine. It has also been used to house COVID-positive homeless people in motels and to provide food to people in quarantine.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Joni way



In a letter received by the Tribune-Star, Vigo County’s Department of Health Administrator Joni Wise wrote to the County Council and Board of Commissioners saying the funding process has changed for 2022 but the Department of Health has not been informed. Way wrote:

• The VCHD was not directed to ask the District Council for additional funding for COVID-19 related expenses in 2020.

• The Department of Health was not directed to ask for funds from the Council when preparing its 2021 budget for expenditure related to COVID-19.

• Health Department has not been directed to ask the Council for additional funding when preparing its 2022 budget for expenditure related to COVID-19.

• All applications related to COVID in 2020 and 2021 were sent to the auditor’s office, marked as such and paid from the CARES law fund for the county, not the general health fund.

• It wasn’t until December 16 that the public health department learned that the manner in which claims were filed in 2020 and 2021 for Covid-19-related expenses would not continue in 2022.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Mike Morris



Mike Morris, President of the Commissioners, said Tuesday that “there is currently no funding. It will stop on December 31st … It has not been funded.”

When asked why, he replied, “I don’t know.”

When asked if something can be done, he said, “Well, they are doing something. They (the health department) go to the council and try to get money for it,” he said.

Before January 1, according to other district officials, the district commissioners had control over how funds from the CARES law were spent.

That won’t be the case after December 31, Morris said. “Not after the first of the year. It was all going to the general fund … from the council,” he said.

Morris noted that several surrounding counties are not conducting contact tracing.

“You (Ministry of Health) did not apply for funding and found out about 10 days ago. This is not my fault. So I’m supposed to correct your mistake – I don’t understand, ”he said.

Commissioner Brendan Kearns, who is in Hawaii, said the CARES law funds are under the control of the commissioners. Much of this was used to cover overtime for health department workers and to hire contact tracers.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Brendan Kearns

However, the question arose as to who is now in control of the CARES Act dollars, and that has not yet been resolved, he said. By mid-December, he believed the county commissioners had full control over those dollars, but other commissioners suggested otherwise.

“I asked my commissioners for a 45 day extension (from CARES Act-Dollar) … after Jan 1st and then we will use that period to figure out where we need to be to make sure the contact tracing is done properly” said Kearns.

Kearns said he spoke with Council President Aaron Loudermilk about a possible 45-day extension of funding for the CARES bill for the public health department.

Given the surge in COVID cases and the surge in local hospitals, Kearns considers it a public health emergency to continue with the Department of Health’s COVID response funding.

“The time is not to stop funding,” said Kearns. “It is the right time to find out what we need to do over the next few months and then create a backup plan in case we see (COVID) spikes again and contact tracing is required.”

Kearns believes there is still a “substantial balance” of funding from the CARES Act that could cover contact tracing for 45 days.

Kearns also said, “There are people in the annex who want the contact tracing to end. I’m not one of them. I will support the end as soon as Dr. (Darren) Brucken says so.” Bridges is the district health officer.

Whose problem is it?

Loudermilk said the district council could not act until there was a request from a department or from elected officials, and in this case none was made.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Aaron Loudermilk

The council supported the requested funds for contact tracing, he said. He only knew in mid-December that the funds for the health department would not be there.

“I think it is a function of the Commissioner. They have made these requests in the past to fund this. I think it is up to them to keep doing this,” said Loudermilk. “I don’t know how that has changed. I wasn’t aware that there would be a change. “

The money from the CARES bill “was usually controlled by commissioners,” he said. “In my opinion it still is.” Applications then go to the council, which applies funds.

He was talking to the police station and bridges, he said. He said he hoped something could be worked out this week so that funding “doesn’t die on January 1st”.

Loudermilk advocates continued funding for perhaps 30 to 60 days “until a solution can be developed for how to proceed,” he said.

There is nothing the Council can do this week. “I believe there is an opportunity for commissioners to debit funds and use them maybe next month for contact tracing,” he said.

Commissioner Chris Switzer said there was a COVID-related item in the general fund.



No CARES money for Vigo Health?

Chris Switzerland

Anything over $ 500 should be submitted to commissioners for approval, he said. “I don’t know if a lot of it happened because I’m only finding out about it today,” he said.

But on December 31st: “That line dies even if there’s still money in it. So if someone wants to say it’s still CARES money, that’s just not true.”

As of January 1, there will be no more funds for this money, but the health department will use it to pay for contact tracers, contract vaccines and other items related to COVID.

“I’m not going to say it was bad planning by Joni and the health department, but that should have been found out sooner,” he said. “They should have included it in their budget during budgetary time or they should have … asked for additional funding” from the Council.

Switzer, a freshman commissioner, said, “Maybe it’s my fault for not being educated enough to know I need to keep these funds going through to 2022, not for the Vigo County Health Department.”

The commissioners have no say in approving rewards that would be paid out to county employees in CARES dollars, he said.

He added, “I think there is a lot of misinformation out there.”

About the contact tracing, he said, “I certainly do not want to stop contact tracing. I think it can be turned back quite a bit. We spend a lot of money on contact tracing. I’d rather see it spent on vaccines. “Education or something so that people get vaccinated more.”

Sue Loughlin can be reached at 812-231-4235 or at sue.loughlin@tribstar.com Follow Sue on Twitter @TribStarSue.

Extra money for native well being boards? Massachusetts lawmakers are engaged on it. | Central Berkshires

Local health officials in Berkshire County and across the state, which are on the forefront of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, could be standing up for an infusion of state funds. That is, if the statehouse legislators on Beacon Hill agree on a final version of the measure, as part of the $ 3.82 billion spending package Adopted by the State Senate last week.

Why it matters

According to the budget change tabled by Senator Jo Comerford, D-Northampton, who represents Hampshire, Franklin and Worcester counties, local and regional health officials would receive $ 95 million in grants aimed at cost-saving community services from small towns aim.

That would be on top of the $ 118 million earmarked for public health, according to Senate President Karen Spilka’s office. With the help of the American Rescue Plan Act and federal surpluses, the Senate bill provides more than $ 1 billion in total health care spending.

What’s at stake

Whether local health officials will see the public health reforms included in Comerford’s amendment depends on negotiations under way this week between House and Senate leaders. It is one of the few differences between the bills tabled by either side of the legislature that need to be reconciled in order to vote on a final draft ARPA spending before the winter break.

“The goal is to get the bill on the governor’s desk by Thanksgiving,” said State Representative William “Smitty” Pignatelli, D-Lenox. “I’m very optimistic that things will be ironed out. I am a great champion of Tri-Town Health. “

The regional agency has served Lee, Lenox and Stockbridge since 1929.

The proposal, approved by the State Senate, adopts reforms based on a 2019 report by the Special Commission on Local and Regional Public Health. The report called on state and local officials to pay to modernize the local public health system, standardize and ensure health reporting that all local health authorities comply with existing regulations and laws.

The commission found that 78 percent of the 105 cities in Massachusetts with fewer than 5,000 residents don’t even have a single full-time public health worker. As boards of directors are funded by local wealth taxes, they also reflect existing regional economic gaps, with poorer communities generally spending less on public health.

“In Massachusetts, where you live determines how safe and healthy you are likely to be,” the commission report said.

What’s the local influence?

“While we are fortunate enough to work in communities that value our department and public health, others are not as fortunate,” said James Wilusz, general manager of Tri-Town Health, which works with seven other cities in recently formed Southern Berkshire Public Health works collaboratively. “There are serious injustices and a lack of adequate resources and personnel. We need real dollars to build and maintain an even broader public health system. “

According to Wilusz, “the pandemic has exposed significant weaknesses in our local public health systems and now is the time to act and build better regional, smaller and more efficient systems.”

“The pandemic has shown all of us the importance of monitoring the health of local people, developing, implementing and monitoring programs to prevent the spread of communicable diseases, and identifying and supporting our most vulnerable community members,” said Amy Hardt, senior public nurse for the collaboration.

The additional government funding could also benefit the Berkshire Public Health Alliance, which is overseen by the Berkshire Regional Planning Commission.

As COVID-19 spread in Massachusetts, some cities lacked the staff and resources to efficiently contact and communicate with state and local officials on the Massachusetts Virtual Epidemiological Network.

Health inspectors juggled their local pandemic responses, rapidly evolving advice on public health and restrictions on Baker administration, changes in contact tracing, and their day-to-day work in monitoring other diseases in their communities.

The bottom line

Under the Senate bill, the state would annually channel funds to local health authorities and regional health districts based on population, social and economic data and the existing level of shared services. Local and regional health authorities that are slow to meet the standards set by reforms could experience lower funding.

The bill calls for grants to promote multi-city sharing agreements. The grants would complement, rather than replace, existing funding received by local and regional health authorities, and would be separate from the annual funding required by the bill.

The Senate plan requires public health professionals to develop statewide standards similar to national standards for inspection, epidemiology, communicable disease investigation and reporting, permits and other local public health responsibilities, along with standards for education, professional development and data reporting.

These experts include the local board of directors for health, health organizations, academic experts, and members of the state’s special commission on local and regional public health.

According to the Senate’s bill, health departments would have to submit a report to the country by December 1 each year to prove that they were in agreement with the new standards.

Information from the State House News Service, the Boston Business Journal, and the Boston Globe was included in this report.

Chickasaw Nation unveils plans for an expansive resort-style vacation spot | Native Information

OKLAHOMA CITY – Chickasaw Nation Governor Bill Anoatubby today unveiled plans for a large resort-style property to be adjacent to the newly opened First Americans Museum. Located on the Oklahoma River near downtown Oklahoma City, OKANA Resort & Indoor Waterpark will be an over $ 300 million tourist destination set to continue the momentum of Oklahoma City’s economic development.

“Strong partnerships and diligent efforts among city and state officials as well as private institutions were an integral part of the launch of the First Americans Museum,” said Governor Anoatubby. “With this world-class First Americans Museum now operational, we are ready to shift our focus to yet another major tourism and hospitality venue. It is our vision that the OKANA Resort will be the experience for visitors not only from our region, but across North America and around the world.

“OKANA Resort & Indoor Waterpark was designed to complement the First Americans Museum’s focus on cultural experiences and connect visitors to other entertainment experiences along this established and vibrant part of the Oklahoma River.”

Announced plans detail the first phase of the project, which will develop approximately 40 acres of the 140 acres held by AICCM Land Development, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Chickasaw Nation.

The resort hotel will feature an 11 story 404 room property offering guests luxury accommodations, river and lagoon views, and proximity to the heart of Oklahoma City and the Boathouse District. In the middle of the property is a 5 acre outdoor adventure lagoon for relaxing and playing, which consists of a main body of water and two smaller bodies of water – all lined with sandy beaches. A footbridge will span the main body of water so guests can easily move around the property. The resort will also include a 33,000-square-foot family entertainment center, over 100,000-square-foot indoor water park, 39,000-square-foot conference center space, a spa and golf simulator, and several retail stores and restaurants.

Chickasaw Nation’s Secretary of Commerce Bill Lance said collaboration between local and state governments and business leaders has made this type of investment possible.

“There is no doubt that an entertainment and lodging complex on this scale will be a major contributor to the exciting advances in Oklahoma City. The resort is expected to initially employ 400 people and the annualized economic impact for the first year is estimated at $ 97 million. In addition, estimates of the 10-year economic impact of this development are projected to exceed $ 1 billion, with full-time employment rising to around 700 to 800. ”

The development will also include a Native American Market and an amphitheater. The market offers First American artists a space to display works of art or other creations. The amphitheater and the outdoor lawn can accommodate around 1,500 people. These venues are designed to complement the museum’s program with local artist performances, festivals, lectures, and similar events.

Lance noted that a new Oklahoma River Cruises ferry dock, funded by a $ 4 million grant from the Federal Transit Administration, could easily connect the development to the Boathouse District. Additional access to the area will be possible through the system of paths from both the north and the south. Because the property is right on the Oklahoma River, visitors have a front row seat on the start line of the US Rowing National High Performance Center’s 2,000-meter course.

Wynne / Jackson, a Dallas-based real estate development company, assisted with development design for the entire project. The New York-based Aquatic Development Group is the hotel developer, while the Wisconsin-based ADCI is the hotel and water park architect. Benchmark Hospitality will operate the hotel and water park, which is expected to employ around 500 people. CallisonRTKL also assists with the master planning of the entire project and acts as the architect for the Native American Marketplace as well as retail and hospitality components. Johnson & Associates of Oklahoma City provided site preparation and ongoing support.

Project funding, including site rehabilitation, infrastructure and development, will come from both private and public sources. Public funding includes tax increase funds, MAPS4, federal transport grants and funds from existing general bond issues.

The plans presented today assume that the project will be completed in late spring 2024.

City and business leaders commented on the announcement of the OKANA Resort & Indoor Waterpark.

“The caliber of this development is world-class and truly worthy of America’s 22nd largest city,” said Oklahoma City Mayor David Holt. “The opening of FAM was only the first step in unlocking the potential of this location for our community. The announcement of the development plan shows how Oklahoma City can become an international destination for indigenous and indigenous culture. This development helps create a place where indigenous and indigenous peoples come together and a place where all people experience this culture. On behalf of the people of Oklahoma City, we are so grateful to the Chickasaw Nation for their vision and commitment to this project. Our mutual partnership is something that Oklahoma City values ​​very much. “

“We are delighted that the area around the First Americans Museum (FAM) is being developed with care and appreciation for the museum’s architectural integrity. Our new neighbors, AICCM Land Development, LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Chickasaw Nation, worked with and involved with FAM in planning the project. The FAM team played an advisory role throughout the process. Both the FAM and the surrounding communities will benefit greatly from the presence of the conference hotel and water park, ”said James Pepper Henry, Director and CEO of the First Americans Museum.

Roy Williams, President and CEO of the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, said, “The number of dining and lodging options for all types of OKC visitors has exploded in recent years. And soon the OKANA Resort will bring an additional experience that complements our unique new museum. The economic impact of a commercial development of this magnitude, especially near the new park and the First Americans Museum, builds on the dynamism that has been achieved in our city in recent years. It pays homage to the “can do” spirit of OKC public and private sector leaders, including our partners in the Chickasaw Nation in particular. “

Oklahoma City Convention and Visitors Bureau President Zac Craig said, “With the world out of the pandemic, we expect competition in the Convention area to be intense for several years. But I can say with confidence that with world-class attractions for both vacation travel and convention companies, OKC is ready to rival any city in this region and beyond. The OKANA project is a welcome and exciting addition to OKC’s hospitality and entertainment portfolio and will further increase the economic vitality of our city. “

Pine Tree band embraces new fashion at area marching contest | Native Information

Ariel Sanchez, a graduate of Pine Tree High School, paints like a calavera – or skull – and wears a delicate blue hat

Pine Tree was one of 25 schools that entered the competition on Tuesday.

The event on Tuesday was the first UIL marching competition of the season. Pine Tree and Spring Hill High School, which also participated, received a “1,” which means they will advance to the area competition. From there only four schools are selected to advance to the state competition.

The theme for Pine Trees Performance was Dia de los Muertos – or Day of the Dead. Large posters with decorative calaveras were placed along the pitch to support the band’s performance, as well as a stage adorned with flags and an ornate image of a girl in a traditional Mexican dress and blue hat.

This is Pine Tree’s second full year as a corps-style band, previously practicing military style.

The style of the corps is identified by its focus on percussion, with props and theatrical performances often accompanied. Military and traditional styles can also be used by marching bands, with the military being popular in the south, said Mark Perry, director of the Pine Tree Band.

“Whether in the military or in the corps, it’s hard to do well,” said Perry.

Many of the bands that entered the competition on Tuesday were military style.

Perry stated that the decision to perform as a Corps band resulted from the need to be more competitive at the area level where most other bands will be using the same style.

“I have the greatest respect for military bands and what they do – tradition is important,” he said. “At the same time, I want my children to know what 95% of the country are doing.”

According to Perry, most marching bands across the country practice the corps style.

“I also wanted to give my children something new that they can bite into and get excited about beyond marches,” he said. “Many military bands push the limits of what is considered to be the military. I would just say that the musical repertoire we can play when you’re in a corps band has more choices. “

Perry said the band started working on a theme for Tuesday’s performance last November.

“Planning for a march show really starts a year ago,” he said.

Perry added that Deputy Band Director and Color Guard Director Jared Cronk was the “Master Visualizer” for Tuesday’s performance and designed all of the costumes worn by Color Guard members.

“March shows are supposed to be so exciting … so how do you make a ‘down’ ending with such a finality?” Perry said about the ending that Sanchez showed off in her makeup and hat.

“(Cronk) that was his plan to do all of that,” he said. “We all know someone who has passed away,” symbolized the last picture of the performance.

Hitting the street in type: the native story of a 1940 Packard | Information

When Jim Long was a kid, his neighbor told him he was going to sell him a car. Life intervened, but after many years the car came into Long’s possession.

Long lived on 193 High Street as a child. He explained that across the street on 194 High Street “lived two bachelors, William Davis and his brother Ross. Mr. Davis was the Church of the Assumption Music Director for many years. He was well known in Bradford. “

Long described Mr. Davis as a very conservative elderly gentleman.

“I don’t think I’ve ever seen him in anything other than a suit and tie,” Long said. Mr. Davis owned a 1940 Packard 110 which he kept in a garage on Rochester Street. To reach his house from the garage, Mr. Davis walked up an alley between Long’s house and his neighbor’s – the popular thoroughfare for those in the neighborhood that goes from point A to point B.

Long said Mr. Davis would always talk to the family when they were out when he came by.

“He always told me he would sell me the car,” Long said. However, Long was drafted into the army in 1966, and when he was released and returned home in 1968, something was different.

“I looked across the street and the house was empty. I asked my mom, ‘What happened to Mr. Davis?’ “Long said. He said his mother stated that Mr. Davis had gotten older and moved to the Holley Hotel because there were no retirement homes at the time and the Holley was a respectable place to live. When Long asked about Mr. Davis’ car, his mother said it had been sold to Paul Abernathy.

Long later learned that Abernathy had gone to church with Mr. Davis, which provided an opportunity to bond for the sale.

During a conversation with Abernathy’s daughter, who is a friend of the family, Long discovered that the car was not being driven. His understanding was that the car was not in tip-top condition when it was sold to Abernathy and he was concerned about its reliability. Instead of driving on the road, the car was idling.

After Abernathy’s death, the car was given to his son Sheldon, who Long said everyone called “Bernie” and who was a local postman. Like his father, the younger Abernathy stowed the car without driving it.

In 2003, however, Sheldon Abernathy had the car completely restored. Long said the work was done by Greg Davis, who has a shop in Westline and does the restoration, and the car was painted by Don Swander. The interior, which was fully restored after the 1940s, was made by a company in Buffalo, NY. executed

Long’s opportunity to purchase the car came accidentally after Sheldon Abernathy’s death when the car was in the possession of John Piganelli, Abernathy’s nephew.

“The funny thing is that I found it by accident,” Long said. He explained that his brother-in-law Lanny Layton had gone to see John Piganelli’s son Evan on an unrelated matter, and during the conversation Evan asked if he knew anyone who might want to buy an old Packard.

“Lanny said, ‘Yes I do,'” Long said. “Lanny called me and I contacted John Piganelli and said, ‘Don’t sell it. I’m going to buy it.'”

Long closed the deal on Aug. 3, agreeing to Piganelli’s condition to take him to the Packard – which he had never ridden in before.

Lange went to work replacing the fuel pump and other parts. The car was not yet ready to drive. Then Long’s friend and VFW colleague Steve Belleville came by.

“He said, ‘We’re going to your garage and we’ll get this thing up and running in five minutes.’ In fact, he was right, ”said Long. “The timing was a little off.”

Long said the car is now running smoothly and has been taking it easy for the past two weeks.

“The longest distance I’ve ridden is my brother-in-law’s house – he lives Stickney,” said Long. “It went well.”

Long said there was a consequence of the car sitting idle.

“Basically, I have a rust problem in the gas tank of (the car) that has been sitting for so many years. I put some fuel filters on it and it seems to be going well, ”he said. “I try to put a few short miles on it and make sure it starts every time I try to start it.”

Long is happy to have a car with such a personal story and to have it ready for new adventures. However, he does not plan to adapt his wardrobe to the decade.

“It’s a pretty decent car. Everyone tells me to get a pinstripe suit and a fedora, but that’s not my style, ”he said.

Native children elevate cash for Afghan refugees | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

From left, Silas Colarusso, 8, Sophie Colarusso, 13, and Amelia Colarusso, 10, hold the bookmarks, drawings and earrings they put up for sale at their booth on Park Avenue, where they raise money for Afghan refugees living on a military base in New Jersey. (Company Photo – Aaron Cerbone)

SARANAC LAKE – From a small roadside stand on Park Avenue, Silas, Sophie, and Amelia Colarusso make a big difference.

The siblings – 8, 13 and 10, respectively – are selling handicrafts from their front yard to raise money to help refugees from Taliban-controlled Afghanistan who live on a military base in New Jersey.

Her mother Kristi said she and her husband explained to their children the news about Afghanistan, the withdrawal of the US military and the takeover of the Taliban.

“We heard what happened and just wanted to help somehow.” said Amelie.

They carried a fake kitchen stand from their basement, a relic from their preschool days, and sold bookmarks, jewelry, and paintings at 425 Park Avenue. They weren’t expecting to raise a lot of money.

“Literally I said, ‘Oh man, I think we’re only going to get cents'” said Silas.

They raised $ 230 in the first three days and this money has already been sent to a church that supports the Afghan evacuees.

“The people of Saranac Lake are really generous” said Sophie.

Your customers are walkers from the neighborhood, friends of the family who stop by to see what they have set up, and drivers who step on the brakes as they drive past.

They have brightly colored origami bookmarks that fit snugly over the corners of a page. Animals are drawn on some. They have bracelets, earrings, and key chains, all made from Lego bricks and beads. Sophi has a painting of a fluffy Shiba Inu dog.

Sophie said her parents have friends in New Jersey who go to a church with a direct link to volunteers on the U.S. military’s McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst Joint Base, where about 8,500 evacuees are currently living in tented camps.

Kristi said it was overwhelming and crippling to see people flee for their lives and end up in a safe country with just what they can carry.

“We want to show our neighbors God’s love” She said.

The Colarusso children were doing handicrafts before they started selling them, but they quickly ran out of supplies and made more. They started with fixed prices for their goods but then moved on to only accepting donations because people were giving so much more money, the prices were pointless.

Last week, US Senators announced that the base will host around 4,500 refugees, with the potential to host up to 13,000. They need supplies for all of the new residents – food, clothing, and essentials.

The US is screening all refugees and preparing to find them permanent homes in America.

Last month, Governor Kathy Hochul announced that New York was ready to accept refugees from Afghanistan.

Kristi said they have been stationed outside the booth in the evenings since they resumed school in Saranac Lake last week, but they plan to keep raising money and sending donations as the needs of Afghan refugees are not going away anytime soon.

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Native Nonprofit Elevating Cash For Single Mothers In Ironman Triathlon

People from all over Northern Michigan and beyond are preparing for the Ironman Triathlon in Frankfurt this weekend. Several local charities using the race as a fundraiser are also preparing for the big event.

In honor of the Ironman coming to Frankfurt, five charities from northern Michigan have been selected by Traverse City Tourism for a “Charity Challenge”. One of them is Single MOMM, based in Traverse City. It is a nonprofit that seeks to support single mothers in Northern Michigan.

“It was really extraordinary that someone saw what we were doing and really wanted to cheer us on and believe in us,” said Chelsea Boeve, community advancement director for Single MOMM.

Boeve also said it’s a really big deal that Ironman came to Frankfurt this year.

Single MOMM by Patrick McIntyre, born and raised in Traverse City. He is deeply involved in the community and loves what their organization does for single mothers in Northern Michigan. McIntyre also played a huge role in bringing Ironman to Frankfurt.

“I think if we look at an Ironman and what it’s known for, I think single motherhood is just an example of that,” Boeve said. “An Ironman competition and training is hard work and being a single mom is really hard work.”

The organization is committed to raising $ 70,000 associated with the 70.3 mile race. At the moment you are halfway there.

“We are raising money to make sure we can reach the families in great need,” she said. “This also includes purchasing a mobile office and making sure that we have someone on site. We’re looking for a local director in Benzie County. ”

Native New Orleans type restaurant raises funds for Hurricane Ida

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) – Southern hospitality and those who offer it always have something special about them.

“I was born and raised in New Orleans. I’ve lived there for 25 years, ”said Andrew Boyer, owner of NOLA on Jan.

Boyer picked up his draw after living in the 504 and later traded it for the 619. When he saw the devastation that Category 4 Hurricane Ida wreaked havoc on his old turf, there was pain for Crescent City.

“I went back to Katrina and I was the devastation and I saw the heartache, basically the depression, and that kind of reminded me of it,” Boyer said.

He wanted to help after Ida swept his home state.

“I listen to my friends; we have no water, we have no electricity,” said Boyer.

So, Boyer’s Restaurant serves up jambalaya, gumbo, etouffee, and more from its New Orleans Comfort menu for charity.

“All items sold, we not just give the proceeds, we will give 50 percent of the sales to the Cajun Navy and the American Red Cross.”

NOLA on May 5th is making this Labor Day weekend appeal to all of their hungry customers looking for their own taste of bayou.

“We left Grace two weeks ago and we know how it was. And I know how influenced people are, ”said Ashley Renae, a customer. “So we wanted to come out, get good food and support them. “

“Any money we can give to help people would be fantastic,” said Jaqi Price, another customer.

It’s a sight that Boyer is overjoyed at. Proof that there is nothing a bowl of gumbo cannot fix.

“To see people who have no connection with Louisiana giving money and so we are here to eat, it is just touching. It just means that people really care, ”Boyer said.

NOLA said on the 5th that the fundraising effort will also apply to takeaway orders of their New Orleans Comfort Food. Customers can call them to place your order for a good cause.

They’re also doing a pass-the-pot event for the LSU game on Saturday to raise funds for their fundraising effort.

Native bicycle owner finishes over 2,400-mile journey elevating cash for JDRF

BLASDELL, NY (WIVB) – After 30 days and 2,400 miles, a local cyclist is finally home.

People gathered in Blasdell to welcome Darwin East back Wednesday after raising more than $ 20,000 for diabetes research.

East, a local Ford employee, cycled to six different Ford plants and to the company’s headquarters. The money goes to the non-profit JDRF, which funds research into type 1 diabetes.

Ost says he wants to do something special after their annual fundraiser was canceled.

“That’s great and you know what everyone has donated here, that’s the thing that everyone has given a little,” said Ost.

“I just want to say what a hero this man is for so many people, we follow his adventures every day on Facebook. His inspiring messages and he made me cry as well as laugh, “added one person after Ost’s trip.

Ford is JDRF’s leading global partner, contributing more than $ 65 million to the company.

Native Palm Springs Bakery Whips Up Southern Fashion Desserts – NBC Palm Springs – Information, Climate, Visitors, Breaking Information

BabyGirls Soul Sweets is a local North Palm Springs bakery that makes southern-style desserts.

“We’ve been baking in the kitchen since we were little, since we could walk,” said Jamiah Hall.

Jamiah and Renaya Hall are the owners of the Soul Desserts Bakery.

“We’ve been doing this since childhood,” says Tanaya Hall, the girls’ mother. “You were in a family of cooks and bakers and now it feels really great because I can be less in the kitchen now.”

The 20- and 21-year-old sister duo started their bakery a year ago at the height of the pandemic, serving the Coachella Valley desserts that have been shared from one generation to the next.

“Recipes have been passed down – our grandma gave us recipes for her 7 up cake, peach cobbler … my grandma’s banana pudding,” said Jamiah Hall. “We started learning the recipes and then we were responsible for Thanksgiving and Christmas … then finally we (we) just made a business out of it.”

BabyGirls is not a traditional bakery. Inspired by family, love and Mediterranean home cooking, the sisters combine classics from the South such as pound cake and peach cobbler to offer customers the best of both worlds.

“If we bring that with us, they’ll say, ‘What is that? What is that? ‘”Said Jamiah Hall. “You’ve never seen the peach cobbler pound cake, so once you’ve taken a bite it’s like a little bit of everything.”

“They took these recipes and – not only took them, they perfected them.”

The Hall sisters said while tweaking the recipes to make them their own, one thing that will never change is the soul-inspired family traditions.

“Soul Satisfying Sweets – that’s our slogan,” said Jamiah Hall. “We always say ‘It’s soul candy’, soul food, comfort food. Food you’d see on Sunday after church at Thanksgiving or family dinners. “

The duo of sisters was a big dream for their small business in North Palm Springs.

“We want to open a food truck one day and have our own storefront,” said Jamiah Hall. “We also want some of our income to go to charitable organizations.”

They say they wouldn’t be where they are today without the support of the community and they hope they can represent the Coachella Valley well.

“We (hope) can make something of ourselves and make our name known to our community,” said Jamiah Hall.