Minnesota Salmonella instances linked to Citterio model Premium Italian-Fashion Salame Sticks

State health officials advise Minnesotans not to eat premium Italian-style Citterio salami sticks

Minnesota Health Department officials warn Minnesota consumers not to eat premium Italian-style salmon sticks made by Citterio and purchased from Trader Joe’s or other retailers after associating salmonella infections with the product.

Three Minnesotans have been identified as part of this outbreak. The patients became ill between September 20th and September 29th. One was hospitalized for two days and all of them have recovered. In all three cases, it is reported that Citterio Premium Italian-style salame sticks were consumed, purchased from Trader Joe at various locations. Health authorities recommend avoiding eating the Italian-style Citterio Premium Salame Sticks that you may have at home. It is not currently known to affect other brands of salami sticks and other Citterio products, but research to determine the scope of the problem is ongoing.

Because many cases of salmonella infection (salmonellosis) fail to seek medical care and get tested, the number of sick people involved in this outbreak is likely to be greater than the identified cases. As a result, health authorities want to alert people to this outbreak who have symptoms of salmonellosis but have not yet consulted a doctor. These people should report this outbreak to their doctor in case they consult one.

Symptoms of salmonella infection are diarrhea, abdominal pain, and fever. Symptoms usually begin within 12 to 96 hours of exposure, but can begin up to two weeks after exposure. Infections usually go away in five to seven days, but about 28% of laboratory-confirmed cases require hospitalization. Many salmonella infections in otherwise healthy people do not require medical treatment. Occasionally, more serious infections will occur. For those seeking medical care, most do not require antibiotics. In some cases, however, antibiotic treatment may be warranted. If you have consumed the affected product, get sick and worry about your health, contact your doctor.

Salmonella: Marler Clark, food safety law firm, is the leading law firm in the country, victims of Salmonella Outbreaks. the Salmonella attorneys from Marler Clark have thousands of victims of Salmonella and other foodborne disease outbreaks and have recovered over $ 800 million for customers. Marler Clark is the only law firm in the country that specializes exclusively in litigation for foodborne illnesses. Our Salmonella Lawyers have fought litigation Salmonella Cases attributable to outbreaks attributable to a variety of foods, such as melons, tomatoes, turkey, salami, sprouts, cereals, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants. The office has brought Salmonella Lawsuits against companies such as Cargill, ConAgra, Peanut Corporation of America, Sheetz, Taco Bell, Subway and Wal-Mart.

If you or a family member a. are sick Salmonella Infection, including Reactive arthritis or Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)After you have consumed food and you want to make a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Salmonella Lawyers for a free case evaluation.

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Blood clots linked to AstraZeneca shot have 22% mortality fee: examine

A paramedic prepares doses of the AstraZeneca vaccine for patients at a walk-in COVID-19 clinic at a Buddhist temple in the Smithfield suburb of Sydney on Aug. 4, 2021.

Saeed Khan | AFP | Getty Images

A new study has provided further details on the “rare but devastating” blood clotting complications associated with the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid-19 vaccine.

In a peer-reviewed article published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine, Massachusetts Medical Society scientists analyzed the first 220 cases of the disease reported in the UK.

The Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine – now one of the most widely used Covid vaccines in the world – was launched in the UK in January, making it the first country to give the vaccine.

A very small number of people who have been vaccinated with the AstraZeneca Vaccine have suffered blood clots. The condition, described by health authorities marked as “extremely rare” by blood clots accompanied by low platelet counts.

Massachusetts Medical Society study uses data from 294 patients who presented to UK hospitals between March 22nd and June 6th) – have been identified.

All of these patients had received their first dose of the Oxford-AstraZeneca shot and went to hospital with symptoms between 5 and 48 days after their vaccination. The average time between vaccination and hospitalization was 14 days, the results showed.

The overall mortality rate for VITT in the study was 22%.

The researchers also found that 41% of patients who presented with VITT were not diagnosed with any underlying health problems. Of those who reported a past or current illness, the study found that there were no prevalent diseases or medications that were “unexpected in the general population”.

“Against the background of a successful vaccination program in the UK, VITT has emerged as a rare but devastating complication,” the study’s authors said in their report. “We found that it often affects young, otherwise healthy vaccine recipients and is associated with high mortality.”

“In our cohort, 85% of the patients were younger than 60 years, although the (Oxford / AstraZeneca) vaccination was predominant in older adults,” the scientists found.

As a precautionary measure, the UK is offering people under 40 years of age an alternative to the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine since May.

People diagnosed with VITT were between 18 and 79 years old, with the mean age being 48, the study showed.

As of July 28, inclusive, an estimated 24.8 million first doses of the Oxford-AstraZeneca Covid vaccine had been administered in the UK, with an estimated 23.6 million second doses received.

On July 28, government figures show that for every million first or unknown doses of the Oxford AstraZeneca shot, 14.9 people developed a rare blood clot with low platelet counts. After a second dose of the vaccine, the number dropped to 1.8 cases per million.

The overall death rate for that period was 18%, the government data showed, with 73 deaths. Six of these occurred after the second dose.

Late last month, AstraZeneca published a study that found the VITT rate was 8.1 per million after the first dose of its vaccine, which dropped to 2.3 per million after a second dose.

According to official information, 411 suspected cases of VITT had been reported in Great Britain by July 28.

Benefits vs. Risks

Ann Taylor, AstraZeneca’s chief medical officer, said in March that the prevalence of blood clots in the number of people vaccinated is lower than what would normally be expected in the general population.

Both UK and EU drug regulators have identified possible links between the Oxford AstraZeneca vaccine and rare blood clots.

In April, the company announced it would comply with government requests in the UK and Europe to update its Covid vaccine labels. However, it stressed that WHO had said “a causal relationship is considered plausible but not confirmed”.

The UK Joint Vaccination and Immunization Committee has stated time and time again that for the vast majority of people, the benefits of the Oxford-AstraZeneca vaccine continue to outweigh the risks.

Several health authorities including the WHO, the European Medicines Agency and the International Society for Thrombosis and Hemostasis agree that the benefits of giving the vaccine outweigh the risks.