Cash raised for Ben Dixon Celebration of Life

Amy and Dave Dixon planned to celebrate their son’s life after losing him to cancer. They knew what food they were going to serve, but what happened next was unexpected.

FORT COLLINS, Colorado – The saying goes, food brings people together.

In the case of Amy and Dave Dixon, the food is used to honor such a loved one, their son Ben.

Ben, 11 years old, recently died after fighting for two years Ewing’s sarcoma, a form of cancer.

“He was really loved,” said Amy Dixon. “Especially when he started his battle with cancer, his story was connected to a lot of people and a lot of people wanted to know him afterwards.”

By the time Amy and Dave were planning Ben’s Celebration of Life event at the end of the month, they knew exactly what kind of food to serve; Sandwiches from his favorite place.

The cancer treatments prevented Ben from eating his favorite sandwiches Snack Attack Specialty Sandwiches and Brews in Fort Collins.

“He loved it and he always wanted to go, but we couldn’t let him go,” Amy said.

Co-owner Lauren and Shawn Storeby were once neighbors to Amy and Dave.

“I wrote to Lauren asking how much it would cost 300 sandwiches, asked if they could do that. And she said we could absolutely do it, “said Amy.

She was blown away by the reaction of the locally run shop.

“I said we will, but I won’t make you an offer. We will take care of it and the community will fund it for you because that is exactly what we do. Said Lauren Storeby.

The Storeby’s have gone one step further start a GoFundMe with a goal of $ 1,500 to raise money for the sandwiches, but the store is also accepting donations at the checkout and online.

By Sunday afternoon, the store had raised more than $ 3,000 in total.

“We had to do something,” said Shawn Storeby. “That was our goal to make them known and to show them that there are other people out there and that they are not alone.”

Amy and Dave said they were naturally grateful for the generosity of the community.

“The Fort Collins-Loveland community has always been just great for us,” said Amy. “It’s too much for a family. So – I mean anything we get beyond the sandwiches, which we will absolutely do well. “Use in the community.”

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U.S. life expectancy dropped by 1.5 years in 2020, greatest drop since WWII

The Covid-19 pandemic cut average life expectancy in the United States by about 18 months in the past year, which is the largest annual decline since World War II, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

According to the report released Wednesday by the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, Americans are now expected to live an average of 77.3 years, compared with 78.8 years in 2019. Hispanics saw the sharpest decline in life expectancy last year, followed by black Americans.

“The decline in life expectancy between 2019 and 2020 is primarily due to deaths from the pandemic,” the report said. Covid deaths accounted for nearly 75% of the decline. More than 609,000 Americans have died in the pandemic, including about 375,000 last year, according to the CDC.

About 11% of the decrease is due to an increase in deaths from accidents or accidental injuries. Deaths from drug overdose, the pointed 30% during the pandemic accounted for about a third of accidental injuries last year.

The life expectancy of American men decreased 1.8 years from 2019 to 2020, while the life expectancy of American women decreased 1.2 years from 2019.

“The difference in life expectancy between the sexes was 5.7 years in 2020, increasing from 5.1 in 2019,
said the report.

Hispanic Americans typically have longer life expectancies than non-Hispanic blacks or whites, but according to the report, Hispanic life expectancy declined more than any other ethnic group in the past year. The life expectancy of all Hispanics decreased by three years, from 81.8 years in 2019 to 78.8 years in 2020. Hispanic men suffered a decrease of 3.7 years in 2020.

“Covid-19 was responsible for 90% of the decline in life expectancy in the Hispanic population,” the report said.

The narrowing of the life expectancy gap between white and Hispanic populations “is a strong indicator of the deterioration in health and mortality scores for a population that, paradoxically, before the Covid-19 pandemic, was able to meet expectations.” coincide with their disadvantaged socio-economic profile. Said the report.

“You were at a greater risk of getting infected,” said Elizabeth Arias, the report’s lead author, in an interview. “People who work in the service sector could not telework.”

Hispanic and Black Americans are largely overrepresented in jobs that were deemed essential during the pandemic lockdown and are more exposed to the virus than office workers who could work from home.

“These groups have been infected and that has a lot to do with their status in society,” said Arias.

Black Americans experienced the second largest decline in life expectancy, falling nearly three years from 74.7 years in 2019 to 71.8 years in 2020, the lowest since 2000, the report said. Covid was responsible for 59% of the decline in life expectancy among blacks.

Life expectancy among white Americans fell 1.2 years in 2020, from 78.8 years in 2020 to 77.6 years, its lowest level since 2002. Covid-19 was responsible for 68% of the decline in whites last year .

Covid-19 was the third leading cause of death last year, and “the overall death rate was highest among non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic Native American or Alaskan people,” the CDC said in its preliminary mortality report in April.

The life expectancy of black Americans consistently lags behind whites, but the last time the life expectancy gap between blacks and whites was this large was in 1999, according to the report.

“You would expect an infectious disease or pandemic to affect everyone … but it affected populations that differed by race and ethnicity,” said Arias.

Other factors that contributed to the 2020 decline in life expectancy include homicides, which accounted for 3% of the decline, and diabetes and chronic liver disease, which accounted for 2.5% and 2.3%, respectively.

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In ‘Zola,’ Janicza Bravo’s cinema of ‘life at excessive quantity’ | Leisure

Harris made friends with Bravo about seven years ago. When the opportunity arose to do “Zola”, Bravo asked him to write it with her. To Harris, “Zola” means more than your average Hollywood breakthrough.

“This is a moment of deep catching up,” says Harris. “The work she did was so consistent that I think people didn’t have a Rosetta Stone for the language she spoke in. We’re not used to being a Black woman in such complex languages ​​in independent cinema to hear speaking. “

“Zola” was originally founded under the direction of James Franco. This version of the film, the filmmakers say, was a more lighthearted frolic. Bravo and Harris approached King’s Twitter thread – a colorfully told, often funny story that brought phrases like “vibing over our hoeism” into the dictionary – with more awe. For Bravo and Harris, the thread was a modern Homeric epic. They wanted to ground the film from Zola’s perspective and capture the way black women can be treated as disposable items and the traumatic consequences of white appropriation of blackness.

“When Janicza came on board, it was more about my voice,” says King, who is executive producer on the film. Her tweets were published in a linen-bound hardcover.

In the film, Zola (played by Taylour Paige) is a Detroit waitress whose new-found friend, a customer she’s waiting for, Stefani (Riley Keough), urges her to come over for a weekend in Florida to party and raise money Earn stripping. Keough plays Stefani as an imitation of Zola, instantly adopting her mannerisms and phrases. For Harris it’s a kind of black face with no makeup; he compares one scene to Spike Lee’s “Bamboozled”. We watch Stefani pull Zola into a hell of a situation.

Kylie Jenner calls Travis Scott a ‘blessing’ in her life | Leisure

Kylie Jenner feels “blessed” to have Travis Scott in her life.

The 23-year-old make-up mogul, who has three-year-old daughter Stormi with the rap star, has signed up on Instagram to pay a beaming tribute to Travis on Father’s Day (6:20:21) and to post a cozy picture of them all together on the platform.

Kylie – who is rumored to have recently rekindled her romance with Travis – wrote on the photo platform: “Happy Father’s Day @travisscott [heart emoji] One day is not enough to honor the father that you are. we are so blessed to have you .. [heart emoji] (sic) “

Kylie posted the family photo after revealing that she would like to get married “someday”.

The brunette beauty – who has 242 million followers on Instagram – insisted she isn’t “thinking about” settling down just yet, but she hopes there will be a wedding in her future.

She said, “I’m not thinking of getting married right now, but I would hope to get married one day.”

Although Kylie’s relationship with Tyga was featured in “Keeping Up With the Kardashians,” her romance with Travis wasn’t like that, and she insisted she never pressured the rapper to get involved.

Kylie stated, “I don’t know, sometimes he didn’t want to be filmed. I never pressured him to be on the show.”

Kylie famously kept her pregnancy a secret until after the birth, admitting that she was trying to avoid judgment on being a young mother.

She said, “I’ve shared so much of my life. I was also very young when I got pregnant.

“It was just a lot for me personally. I didn’t know how to get this out in public either. With any opinion, it was just something I had to go through for myself, so I decided not even to deal with it. ” . “

Automobile present raises cash for Relay for Life | WDVM25 & DCW50

HAGERSTOWN, Md. (WDVM) – Ordinarily you would only see historic aircraft on the tarmac at Hagerstown Aviation Museum, but cars of all makes and models rolled onto the tarmac on Saturday for a special fundraiser.

The museum hosted the 9th Annual Cruise for a Cure, a fundraiser that benefited Relay for Life of Washington County.

The event, which was canceled last year due to the pandemic, featured local vendors, live music and classic cars, new and even bespoke cars for the Wings and Wheels car show and fundraiser.

The event also holds a special place in the heart of event founder and three-time cancer survivor Sara Mulkey. She started the event in Hampton, Virginia with her father, a cancer survivor of over 20 years, before moving to Hagerstown in 2010 and continuing the fundraiser.

“It means the world to me. Many of them are auto club members from the Stablemates Mustang Club. We got other clubs involved and only people who hear from us through word of mouth, ”Mulkey explained. “But for me it really warms my heart to see all these people out here.”

Billy Hahn helped Mulkey plan the annual event, which typically lasts around 6 months, and was delighted with the participation this year. He stated that the final Cruise for a Cure of 2019 was dampened slightly by the rain and then the pandemic.

Last year, while complying with COVID safety precautions, Cruise for a Cure was able to hold a small cruise event to raise funds for Relay for Life.

‘Tunch and Wolf’ stroll this weekend raises cash for Gentle of Life

Former Pittsburgh Steelers lineman Craig “Wolf” Wolfley remembered Thanksgiving Day in the 1980s. His friend and teammate Tunch Ilkin invited Wolfley to serve turkey and all the trimmings Life of Life rescue mission on the north side of Pittsburgh.

“There were a lot of fancy dinner parties and galas that I thought we could volunteer, but Tunch insisted I join him at Light of Life,” said Wolfley. “I will never forget the moment when I walked in and saw a mother and a father and two young children. Seeing her broke my heart. It just tore me apart. “

Since then, Wolfley and Ilkin have been supporting Light of Life. They are the faces of the annual homeless walk.

The 19th annual event is Sunday.

Sunday celebrations will take place on the Great Lawn on North Shore Drive on the North Side of Pittsburgh from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. It’s free and includes food and music. People can donate Here.

Courtesy Light of Life Rescue Mission

Former Pittsburgh Steelers teammates Craig Wolfley (right) and Tunch Ilkin hold up signs thanking the people who support the Light of Life Walk for the homeless. The 19th event is on June 13th.

Wolfley said Ilkin plans to attend Sunday’s event because of his commitment to helping Light of Life. The two chat daily and see each other at least once a week. Last week, Ilkin announced his resignation after 23 seasons from the broadcast booth to focus on his fight against ALS, the debilitating disease that attacks the nervous system.

After her playing days, Wolfley moved to Ilkin on the Steelers Broadcast Team.

“Tunch is my brother,” said Wolfley. “God brought us together 41 years ago. My mother says she has four boys and my sisters call him brother. He fights every day. Tunch is a guy who never gives up, never gives up. “

The entire Light of Life Rescue Mission organization is honored to have Tunch and Wolf as friends for more than 35 years, said Doug Smith, Light of Life development director.

“Since walking through the doors of the Mission, they have continued to bless our organization by volunteering, conducting Bible studies with clients, speaking at chapel services, doing the Tunch & Wolf’s Walk for them

Homeless 19 years ago and a lot more, ”said Smith.

Wolfley said they would have more volunteers than participants for the first walk. The event continues to grow, he said.

The aim is to raise US $ 100,000 for the mission to provide food and shelter for men, women and children affected by homelessness, poverty or addiction.

The money raised will go to the “Thanks a Million” campaign to raise $ 1 million in honor of Ilkin and Wolfley “Tunch & Wolf”, who have supported the organization for 35 years. The funds will help fund the renovation of a building for long-term residential programs.

“Light of Life is a wonderful organization that is changing people’s lives and making a difference,” said Wolfley.

Wolfley said Light of Life provided 377,000 meals in 2020.

“One meal can make a difference in a person’s life,” said Wolfley. “The first Thanksgiving I spent there definitely did it for me.”

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is a contributor to Tribune Review. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062, jharrop@triblive.com or via Twitter .

Wilmer Valderrama: Fatherhood is the largest win of my life | Leisure

Wilmer Valderrama admits that fatherhood feels like the “greatest asset” of his life.

The 41-year-old actor has a three-month-old daughter named Nakano with Amanda Pacheco, and he enjoys the challenge of parenting and admits it made him “tougher” in his professional life.

He shared, “I always knew why I was doing what I was doing.

“I’ve always said if you wake up this morning you will already win. And when I wake up I feel like I’ve won because I just woke up and then go to her room and wake her up in the morning before she feeds and sees her eyes open … it’s the biggest win I’ve ever been in my life had.

“That is something different. And it makes me vibrate harder – everything you see, what I do professionally and spiritually … especially with my mind, my soul and my body should not only be a role model, but a great role model . “

Wilmer – who previously dated Demi Lovato, Mandy Moore, and Ashlee Simpson – is determined to set an example for his daughter.

He thinks it is imperative that she also have strong female role models in her life.

The actor told The Jess Cagle Podcast: “I was thinking of their generation and you know what toys will they play with? Will they look like them? Are there heroes who look like them? Are there women who can ? strive to be? “

Wilmer also revealed why he named his daughter Nakano.

He stated, “I think she has to defend herself in life. That’s why I gave her a strong name.

“It’s the name of a legendary warrior in Japan and I wanted her to have the conversation: ‘What does your name mean?'”

Robert Englund says Freddy Krueger’s position modified his life | Leisure Information

Robert Englund admits that playing Freddy Krueger has made him an international star.

The 71-year-old actor played an icon in A Nightmare on Elm Street in 1984, and Robert confessed that it changed his life and career.

Robert, who also appeared in the TV miniseries “V” at the beginning of his career, explains: “I was lucky. I played my best friend and pal in the ’70s, but it ended up being everyone’s favorite redneck. I was already started in Holly Strange, who am I? I would know. When I was doing Freddie, it hit me with an international actor overnight.

“I’ve never had such a success. It was like grabbing a carousel ring. I understand, I was just waiting. “

Robert admitted that the new technology contributed to the success of the Nightmare on Elm Street franchise.

And given the popularity of various spin-offs, including other films and TV series, Robert now believes he is his “third generation fan”.

He told the Inside of You podcast, “My career matured during the video revolution, so I shot the film in the theater and became a hit again when it was released on video for everyone else to see. I’ve been twice that … and the TV series doesn’t count.

“And I not only have eight times as much, but also DVDs and Blu-rays, cables and cable marathons again. So you’re getting a new generation – I’m my 3rd generation fan. “

Robert Englund Says Freddy Krueger’s Role Changed His Life On Entertainment News

Source link Robert Englund Says Freddy Krueger’s Role Changed His Life On Entertainment News

Jerry West displays on the life and legacy of Kobe Bryant

Jerry West may be the man whose silhouette adorns the National Basketball Association logo, but he’s also the man responsible for turning Kobe Bryant into a Los Angeles Laker.

The eight-time NBA champion spoke to CNBC’s The News with Shepard Smith about his relationship with the former Lakers superstar and his thoughts on his late boyfriend, who will be inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame on Saturday.

“I will remember [Bryant] as someone I loved like a brother. The playful moments with him, some of the fun things and the exchanges we had. Watching him start what he became, “West told CNBC.

Bryant, 41, his daughter Gianna, 13, and seven other people died in a helicopter crash near Calabasas, California on January 26, 2020.

West, a former player and 14-time NBA All-Star, coached the Lakers and eventually moved to the team’s front office. He stood behind the Lakers dynasty in the 1980s and is the proud owner of eight championship rings in his life. He is also the man credited with bringing Bryant to the Lakers after organizing a draft day deal with the Charlotte Hornets.

West recognized Bryant’s talent for basketball early on and did not shy away from the 17-year-old, even though he only played in high school.

Jerry West and Kobe Bryant salute before the game between the Golden State Warriors and the Los Angeles Lakers on December 18, 2017 at the STAPLES Center in Los Angeles, California.

Andrew D. Bernstein | NBAE via Getty Images

“We just fell in love with him. From the time we coached him in Los Angeles, and especially the second time we coached him … from then on, it’s been like, I love the way you get we this guy? “

The two developed a bond over the years. West said his son would drive around Bryant and his wife would cook him Italian food for dinner.

“He was one of the greatest players we have ever seen, but he was also one of the brightest players we have ever seen,” said West.

While Bryant achieved so much on the court, West also took pride in his extrajudicial contributions, especially when it came to helping women’s basketball.

Bryant helped give voice to the Women’s National Basketball Association and its players, and often attended games with his daughter.

“He was a bright light” for women basketball players, West said. “Whatever he did turned to gold and I think he was as a person.”

On Saturday, Bryant’s idol Michael Jordan will induct him into the Hall of Fame. From a young age, Bryant looked up to Jordan and even tried to model his game after him.

“This is going to be a historic night to honor a legendary player who is no longer with us and it just doesn’t seem right to be honest,” said West. “To have his idol there to introduce him … I think we all feel a little bit robbed.”