Grammar, Fashion, and the Rule of Legislation in E-Discovery (plus Cheesecake) | Affiliation of Licensed E-Discovery Specialists (ACEDS)

I am a big believer in rules. Rules bring order to what could otherwise be chaos. Rules set expectations. Rules guide human behavior (and sometimes non-human behavior). Hell, rules govern how machines compute, perform tasks, and analyze data.

We need rules.

Admittedly, my rebellious side often suggests to me that some rules should be broken. Take the stop sign in front of my house, for example. I often wallow slowly (in both directions, of course), knowing the rule is to stop, even when my wife reminds me that the sign says a stop and I mumble, “Stop signs are only suggestions for” those of us who drive carefully. ”Okay, that’s a bad example, but you get what I’m talking about.

And then some of the rules are pretty fuzzy. Take cheesecake. At home, it’s a rule that nothing goes into the cheesecake except the necessary ingredients. The blissful creaminess, the sweet but sour impression it leaves behind – a good cheesecake doesn’t need anything else. I love strawberries, but it’s a rule not to mess cheesecake (or other toppings or mixes) with them. Those who do this made something other than a cheesecake.

So when my friend and colleague Doug Austin out eDiscovery Today wrote this week The fact that the words “electronic discovery” should be written in short form “eDiscovery” made me think – there has to be a rule for this literal combination of two words. Doug is not the first to suggest this notation. For years it has also been discussed whether the “e” should be separated or not, whether the E should be capitalized or even omitted entirely. It is a fair and reasonable debate. And it’s high up in the pantheon of e-discovery stories with the Tiff versus native productions debate (and we all know who wins that debate, right?).

So in the spirit of trying to solve the industry’s most pressing problems, I set out to solve that problem once and for all. The question, my friends, is e- or not e-.

(Note: there is a minor minor issue with capitalizing E or D, but that’s pretty straightforward).

Since neither Congress nor any other legislative body in the world has, or is likely to have, influence, I have turned to the Chicago Manual of Style. For many, this manual is the Bible for those who work with words. Since it was first published 110 years ago, it has been the indispensable reference work for authors, editors, proofreaders, copywriters and publishers. Since the twelfth edition in 1969, more than a million copies of the manual have been sold. The sixteenth edition was published in 2010 and remains my guide to writing style. There are other manuals, of course, and the rules are very similar, but I think The University of Chicago Press’s is the most widely used.

So let’s dig in. First the simple things.

Rule 1

There should be no question that it is correct to capitalize the “E” when starting a sentence with the word “e-discovery”. Not even the most seditious linguists and mutinous grammarians could disagree. The only possible exception are proper names or brand names.

Rule # 2

Regarding the capital “D” – it is never correct to capitalize a letter in the middle of a word unless that word is a proper name or a private label (e.g. eBay or iPhone).

Based on our first two rules, Doug and eDiscovery Today are clearly given a pass to use the lowercase e and the uppercase D as that is the real name of his blog, his brand. But unfortunately, for the rest of us, based on the rules, we have to start sentences with “e-discovery”, and worse, “eDiscovery,” as sexy as it may seem – I’m sorry, it’s just not correct based on the rules.

Next we need to deal with the slightly more complicated topic – the hyphen. Many of the rules regarding usage and punctuation depend on whether words appear in the dictionary. The most common reference is the Merriam-Webster’s Dictionary. But while both “electronic” and “Discovery” appear in the dictionary, “E-Discovery” does not appear. If e-discovery were in the dictionary it could solve the problem as people would just look it up and use this form. Since this is not the case, let’s turn to the rules for putting words together.

If we examine it for parts of speech, we can see that “electronic” is an adjective describing the noun “discovery” or adding a grammatical attribute or meaning. In the Chicago Manual of Style, the rule is to separate before but not after the noun. However, this rule applies to the use of both full words. What happens if the composition is one of the so-called “E-words”, which clearly seems to apply here. Think e-commerce, e-book. The best example in the Chicago Manual of Style is “electronic mail” or email. The manual says that we should write e-mails (with a hyphen). I don’t know how or why now, but for the past few years we’ve all been writing “email” (without a hyphen). But the correct form of putting two words together in the “e” world we all live in now is hyphenation (i.e., email).

We’ve all been doing that for many years, as far as I can remember. Somehow we got away from the hyphen. The Associated Press stopped hyphenation of emails in 2011; the New York Times stopped in 2013 (“precisely because of popular demand”). What has changed? Well the only thing I could find actually proves one of the above premises – once a word is published in a dictionary, that usage becomes the norm. And guess what happened between 2010 and 2013? Dictionaries began to publish the word “email” without the hyphen.

I also found a notice on the Oxford Dictionaries website suggesting that “email” (no hyphen) was simply becoming the most common usage. But even the people of Oxford say, “When in doubt, separate.”

What happened to email seems to have happened to many words. We just combined them and made a new word without a hyphen and the new, popular usage took over. But once they’re in a dictionary, it seems more official, doesn’t it?

But I digress. Let’s come back to the penultimate question about e-discovery – the hyphen.

The hyphenation rules in the English language are very different, if not contradicting itself. In many contexts, it probably doesn’t matter that much, and putting words together can be even more complicated. What does the Chicago Manual of Style say?

Rule # 3

The Chicago Manual of Style clearly recommends the use of a hyphen when compounding two words. The reasoning is certainly a little ambiguous, but it is clear from the Style Guide that their Hyphenation Guide for compound words and prefixed words requires hyphenation for compound words preceded by an “e”, except in cases of proper names.

There you have it – the “rules” say “e-discovery” (with a hyphen) is the right use.

See, rules aside, the key to all of these grammar and punctuation marks is clarity. It needs to be clear to the reader what you are writing about. I don’t think anyone will misunderstand what I mean whether I am writing e-discovery or e-discovery, so personally I think it is okay to use both.

But for the sake of rules, I’ll keep writing e-discovery until the word is added to the dictionary.

Oh oh you know what I just discovered that Merriam-Webster already has. Anyone want to guess how they spell it? Listen here.

In August 2009, in response to a debate that was raging through the pages of Law Technology News (the predecessor of Legaltech News), the famous LTN editor Monica Bay published an edict that resonated with me then as now: “No, which remains. “

I’m with Monika. Who wants to argue with that?

Note: This article was written with a healthy dose of sarcasm and humor, a touch of truth, and a touch of sincerity

Zendaya And Legislation Roach Helped Tom Holland’s Model

Everyone says thanks to Zendaya and Law Roach.

When it comes to zendaya and the red carpet moments we’ve all been waiting for, their iconic status is undeniable. Whether she’s dressed for the Met Gala or just walking down the street, the 25-year-old always looks stunning.

Vittorio Zunino Celotto / Getty Images

And since Zendaya and her Spiderman costar Tom Holland started dating, Some fans have noticed that our current Peter Parker has undergone a small style development.

Zendaya deserves an award for changing Tom’s style because he is so handsome and so glad she made him throw away his hair gel

05:46 – November 30, 2021

Twitter: @druiganti / Via Twitter: @druiganti

Let’s be honest Before Zendaya courted him, Tom’s style was a bit … lackluster on the red carpet.

Ian West – PA Images / PA Images via Getty Images

Help.

Agency Anadolu / Getty Images

At least he spiced things up here with a blazer.

Nurphoto / NurPhoto via Getty Images

But that was old Tom. The pre-Zendaya era Tom. Now as someone in a relationship with that youngest person ever honored at the CFDA Fashion Icon Award I let the photos speak for themselves:

Marc Piasecki / WireImage

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Michael Tran / AFP via Getty Images

What was once speculated about Zendaya’s contribution to Tom’s sense of style has now been confirmed by a few photo tags on the British actor’s Instagram, where he largely attributes his new clothes to stylist Law Roach.

For those who don’t know @LuxuryLaw, aka Law Roach, was Zendaya’s stylist since she was 13 years old. Together, the duo created Zendaya’s most unforgettable looks and she shared her CFDA spotlight with him. saying, “Last night an absolute dream came true thanks to the CFDA, this moment meant the world” [Law Roach] and me.”

Samir Hussein / Samir Hussein / WireImage, James Devaney / GC Images / Getty Images

Now, just as Law played Zendaya’s fairy godmother at the 2019 Met Gala, he’s also sharing a little magic with Tom – with the encouragement and approval of Zendaya, I’m sure.

Karwai Tang / WireImage / Getty Images

Cheers to the impeccably dressed couple and the man who makes everything possible! ?

Kevin Winter / Getty Images, Samir Hussein / Samir Hussein / WireImage / Getty Images

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CSBS Releases Cash Transmission Mannequin Legislation | Troutman Pepper

On September 9, the Conference of State Banking Supervisors (CSBS) published the Model Transmission Modernization Act (Model Act) In an effort to replace the 50 country-specific money transmitter laws with a nationwide standard. Unless the states adopt the Model Law, there will be no change to existing state money transfer laws.

When enacted by states, the law will create a common regulatory system for the transfer of money, including stored value, the sale of payment instruments, and the transfer of fiat and virtual currency. The law would require licensees to maintain net tangible assets of at least $ 100,000, or a percentage of their total assets. In addition, licensees would have to submit audited financial statements for each fiscal year and submit all reports required by federal laws, such as the Banking Secrecy Act.

In addition, the model law provides for an agent for the exemption of the payee, which is currently only permitted by a little more than half of the states. The exemption requires: (1) a written agreement between the payee and the agent instructing the agent to collect and process payments from payers on behalf of the payee; (2) the payee must present the agent to the public as accepting payments for goods or services on behalf of the payee; and (3) payment for the goods and services is deemed to have been received by the payee when it is received by the agent, so that the payer is no longer liable and the payer is not at risk of loss if the agent fails to transfer the funds to the payee. Several states currently have specific language requirements to be included in the agreement, but the Model Law does not include such a requirement.

Although some states expressly exempt subcontractors from their money transfer laws, and other states implicitly exempt contractors, trustees, and others who are either not “in business” of transferring money or who conduct money transfers as an ancillary business to businesses, the Model Act does not provide for such an exception . In fact, according to the Model Act, contract processors are expressly obliged to obtain money transfer licenses.

However, the Model Act provides for an exception for payment processors. This exception would apply where the payment processor acts as an intermediary in processing payments between a legal entity that has directly entered into a pending money transfer obligation to a sender and the sender-designated recipient if the legal entity: (1) is properly licensed or by the Licensing in accordance with the Model Act; (2) provide the sender with a receipt, electronic record, or other written confirmation that identifies the entity as the provider of the money transfer in the transaction; and (3) has sole responsibility for completing any outstanding funds transfer obligation on the sender, including the obligation to complete the sender if funds are not transferred to the sender’s designated recipient. In the model law, it is unclear whether multiple payment processors within a chain are excluded (i.e. a representative of the payee’s representative or a nested relationship).

With state and federal laws struggling to keep pace with payment innovation, there is a glaring problem between state and state laws – uniformity – regarding the definition of money transfer and the exemptions from licensing or registration. Firms in the payments environment should be proactive in advocating consistency with their government regulators that does not remove exceptions to applicable government laws. Troutman Pepper is working to find exemptions in state and state money transfer laws for its customers. Please contact us if you have any questions.

Cash & the Legislation: Laws on over-the-counter listening to aids nonetheless awaited | Enterprise

Back in August 2017, Congress passed the Food and Drug Administration’s Reauthorization Act in a remarkable (these days) bipartisan effort. Among other things, this law instructed the FDA, an agency of the Department of Health, to establish a class of hearing aids that can be bought over the counter, such as toothpaste.

The FDA was given until August 18, 2020 to issue a draft ordinance to implement the law. This regulation should provide adequate guarantees of safety and effectiveness; Set output limits and labeling requirements; and otherwise establish rules for how over-the-counter hearing aids are sold in-store, by mail, or online. The FDA should issue a final ordinance no later than six months after the draft ordinance is drafted. But it is now September 12, 2021; There is no such regulation, and the FDA blaming COVID has apparently left the project behind.

This failure by the FDA to fulfill a clear mandate from Congress despite COVID has disheveled some feathers. Last November, two senators who supported the 2017 hearing aid legislation, Elizabeth Warren and Charles Grassley, then head of the FDA, wrote a letter asking him to do what Congress told his agency – to pass the ordinance . The senators said, “Hearing difficulties are linked to depression and dementia and increase the risk of falls in older adults.” In addition, hearing aids are expensive as prescription products and are usually not covered by health insurance.

Then, on July 9th of that year, the Biden government issued a far-reaching executive order directing all government agencies to get to work to create a competitive marketplace that is “critical to maintaining America’s role as the world’s leading economy ” is. This implementing ordinance contained an instruction to the Secretariat for Health and Social Affairs to issue the ordinance on over-the-counter hearing aids required by the 2017 law within 120 days (by November 6). So we’ll see what happens.

Of course, a delay in the availability of over-the-counter hearing aids doesn’t disappoint. In Colorado and elsewhere, licensed hearing aid manufacturers and audiologists benefit from a prescription marketplace and may need to adjust their business models if they compete with companies like Amazon.

Until over-the-counter hearing aids become a reality, some people with hearing problems may receive help from a “personal sound amplification device”. These are usually low-tech products that work on the same principle as turning up the volume on your TV, and they are not allowed to be called hearing aids. However, they can be purchased without a prescription and are much cheaper than real hearing aids.

In the event that older readers are wondering about this, despite careful research, I have not yet found anything in the law that prohibits hearing aid sellers from knowing your age and informing you after your 60th birthday.

Jim Flynn works for Flynn & Wright LLC in Colorado Springs. You can reach him at moneylaw@jtflynn.com.

Cash & the Regulation: Colorado has had its share of conservatorship dramas | Enterprise

With the Britney Spears melodrama for inspiration, I thought I’d tell you a few things about conservatories.

Establishing a conservatory begins with filing an application with a probate court asking the court to put someone – a so-called “restorer” – in charge of the financial affairs of the person whose abilities allegedly fail, which are considered “protected.” Person ”. Before the motion can be upheld, the court (in Colorado at least) must be presented with clear and convincing evidence that the protected person “is unable to manage property and business because the person is unable to obtain information effectively maintain or evaluate or both or make decisions or communicate. … “

The protected person must be informed about the procedure and is entitled to a lawyer. The court may also appoint a person known as a “visitor” to conduct an investigation aimed at providing the court with an objective analysis of the need for a restorer.

The conservator, when appointed, assumes the position of trustee, which means that the protected person is owed the duty of the greatest loyalty and honesty. The court issues the conservator with an official (and official-looking) document that can be used by the conservator to take over the protected person’s assets and liabilities. The court may adapt the curator’s powers to the particular circumstances of the case.

Once a conservator has been appointed, the protected person is deprived of the power to conduct his or her own financial affairs. The law also protects against liability people who deal with the protected person in good faith and without knowledge of the existence of a restoration. So a protected person can still wreak havoc if not carefully watched.

The motivation for a conservatory sometimes comes from children who fear that a parent in decline will squander family wealth before it can be passed on as inheritance. This is not a fair reason for a restoration. Rather, the purpose should be to preserve assets in the “best interests” of the protected person. Preservation of wealth in the interests of the protected person can (incidentally) also have the effect of preserving wealth for an inheritance if the protected person dies.

Colorado has its share of conservatory melodramas. In a recent case, a man named Bernard Black – a full law professor at Northwestern University School of Law – was found to have violated a duty of loyalty to his sister, the protected person, as a conservator. This break involved a diversion of assets from a trust set up by the late mother to meet her daughter’s needs to a trust in which her son, the conservator’s children, had an interest. This dispute over control of the late mother’s property found its way in eight courts in three states (meaning much of the mother’s property has now been consumed by the legal profession).

In another case that went before the Colorado Court of Appeals, Matthew Keenan, a protected individual, attempted to dismiss a bank that was acting as its curator. The bank struggled, and the dispute merged into a dispute for $ 200,000 plus legal fees and costs claimed by the bank.

Jim Flynn can be reached at moneylaw@jtflynn.com.

New Illinois Regulation Permits Scholar Athletes To Lower Cash-Making Offers – CBS Chicago

CHICAGO (CBS) – Governor JB Pritzker signed an important bill Tuesday allowing student athletes in Illinois to receive compensation.

CBS 2’s Mugo Odigwe spoke to one of the state officials who urged to make this happen.

CONTINUE READING: Chicago Weather: Last day of humid, inconsistent weather on Wednesday

“Being able to implement guidelines on something that is extremely personal to me and that I have had a lot of intimate experience with is a great day for all of us,” said State Rep. Kam Buckner (26th Ward).

Years ago, Buckner couldn’t make money off his own likeness as a University of Illinois football player.

“If you study chemistry, for example, you still have the option of receiving market-based compensation for using your name, your likeness and your image. However, you can’t do that if you’re a scholarship football or tennis or hockey player. “

Now, as an Illinois legislature, he has sponsored a bill that will allow current and future athletes to do just that. With Pritzker’s signature,
student athletes can be paid for their names, pictures, and even votes.

“The most obvious thing people talk about is the star quarterback or star point guard getting a deal with a merchandising company like Nike or Reebok, and those things are allowed. But there is also the possibility, for example the women’s softball player, to put her face on the poster of the local pizzeria, ”said Buckner.

Opponents of the legislation argued that this could lead to a situation where students looking for money deals would be deceived. Buckner says there are rules in place to make sure this doesn’t happen.

CONTINUE READING: Moody’s is raising Illinois’ bond rating for the first time since 1998

“We gave them the opportunity to get legal advice,” said Buckner. “We gave them the option to hire an agent and we also banned certain types of endorsement. You can’t approve of things like alcohol. like cannabis. like video. like sports betting or casinos and games of chance. “

Buckner says the future will be much better for these athletes.

“It’s going to be a new day for many college athletes and we’re very excited about it.”

While the new law doesn’t boil down to paying college players, it should be a big deal for many student athletes.

“As a retired undergraduate athlete, I understand the meaning and importance of a day like this,” said Derrick Gragg, Northwestern University sports director. “Whenever we can be part of something so historic, it is important to get up.”

“Of course, you know, since I’m five years older – one of the fans’ favorites – I can now stream live, play video games with younger kids, surprise birthdays for younger people, you know, different things – so I’m going to get that opportunity.” take full advantage, ”said Illinois basketball guard Trent Frazier.

The law allowing payment for the use of the name, picture and picture of student athletes goes into effect this Thursday, which means that students can start accepting related offers that are offered to them.

MORE NEWS: Help is coming to Illinois parents seeking childcare and childcare providers

The NCAA will vote tomorrow on a proposal that will set rules nationwide for states that do not enact new laws.

New York Metropolis Enacts Biometrics Regulation for Meals and Drink Institutions, Leisure Venues, and Retail Shops

New York Biometric Identification Information Act goes into effect July 9th. The law applies to food and beverage stores, entertainment venues, and retail stores in New York City that collect, store, convert, store, or share biometric identification information (e.g., retinal or iris scans, fingerprints, voice prints, and hand scans). of customers. According to the law, affected companies must post clear, noticeable notices near all customer entrances to their facilities. The law gives injured customers a private right to sue with 30 days’ notice and a grace period, with damages between $ 500 and $ 5,000 per violation and legal fees.

Effective July 9th, pursuant to Section 22-1202 (a) of the New York City Administrative Act, New York City businesses that collect, store, transform, store, or disclose biometric identification information from customers must disclose, or share, such collection, storage, conversion, storage , if applicable, by placing a clear and prominent sign near all customer entrances to their facilities. This signage must use plain, simple language.

Essential elements of the law are:

Definitions

  • Commercial establishments. The definition of commercial establishments is limited to entertainment venues, retail stores, or catering establishments.
  • Places of entertainment. Entertainment venues refers to any private or public entertainment facility such as theaters, stadiums, arenas, race tracks, museums, amusement parks, observatories, or any other location where attractions, performances, concerts, exhibitions, sports games, or competitions are held.
  • Biometric identifier information. The term biometric identifier information means a physiological or biological characteristic used by or on behalf of a commercial entity, individually or in combination, to identify or help identify an individual, including, but not limited to: (i ) a retinal or iris scan, (ii) a fingerprint or voice print, (iii) a scan of the hand or face geometry, or any other identifying feature.

Prohibition of the use of biometrics

  • Section 22-1202 (b) prohibits commercial establishments from selling, renting, trading, sharing, or otherwise using such biometric identifier information.

Private right of action

The law contains a private right of action that provides for the following:

  • Notice and healing period. Aggrieved parties must give written notice to the offending parties at least 30 days prior to commencement of a lawsuit alleging a commercial establishment of violating 22-1202 (a). Actions alleging violation of 22-1202 (b) do not require prior written notice stating that commercial entities may not sell, share, or benefit in any way from a customer’s biometric information.
  • Statutory Compensation. Dominant parties may reclaim: (i) US $ 500 for any unhealed disclosure breach or negligent breach of prohibition on sale / disclosure of biometric information; (ii) $ 5,000 for each willful or negligent breach of the No Sale / Transfer; (iii) reasonable attorney fees and expenses; and (iv) other remedies, including an injunction, as the court deems appropriate.

Exceptions

  • The law does not apply to government agencies, employees, or agents.
  • The disclosure requirement in 22-1202 (a) does not apply to financial institutions or companies that collect biometric identification information through photos or video recordings if: (i) the collected images or videos are not analyzed by software or applications that identify or assist with identification by persons based on physiological or biological characteristics, and (ii) the images or videos will not be shared, sold or rented to any third party other than law enforcement agencies.

Leisure Information Roundup: Harry Potter, ‘Mates’ could fall sufferer to Hungary’s anti-LGBT regulation: broadcaster; Harry Potter, ‘Mates’ could fall sufferer to Hungary’s anti-LGBT regulation: broadcaster and extra

The following is a summary of the latest entertainment news.

Harry Potter, “Friends” could fall victim to Hungarian anti-LGBT law: broadcaster

The biggest channels in Hungary criticized a new law banning “displaying and promoting homosexuality” among 18-year-olds as a threat to freedom of expression, and one said it could affect some screenings. impact Harry Potter Movies and classic TV shows. The nationalist government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban passed the law on Tuesday despite criticism from human rights groups and the European Unionwho said this could lead to a loss of development funds for Hungary.

Norway’s wealth fund supports Vivendi’s plan to spin off Universal Music

Norway’s $ 1.35 trillion sovereign wealth fund, the largest in the world, said Thursday it would support Vivendi’s spin-off plan Universal music, including the distribution of shares in kind to Vivendi shareholders. Regardless, in accordance with its policy of transparent executive compensation based on the long-term shareholder interests, the Fund will vote against the compensation of Vivendi’s chairman, chief executive, top management and board members.

Warner Music is buying French Music catalog by DJ David Guettaetta

Warner Music Group said Thursday it would buy in celebration French DJ David Guetta’s music catalog for the past two decades and sign a new contract with him for future recordings. The move will add Guetta’s work to the world’s third largest record label, which includes artists like Cardi B, Ed Sheeran and Bruno Mars.

Diana Horse says ‘thank you’ in new music after 15 years

American singer Diana Horse expresses her gratitude in a new single “Thanks” released the title track of their first studio album in 15 years on Thursday. Horse, the former singer of the hugely successful group The Supremes from Motown Records, recorded the songs in her home studio during the COVID-19 pandemic. The album is described as “a powerful, comprehensive musical message of love and togetherness”.

Despite divorce, Kim Kardashian says she’s the biggest fan of Kanye West

Kim Kardashian said her ex-husband Kanye West is like family despite her divorce, and adds on a TV show airing Thursday that she will always be his biggest fan. KardashianThe 40-year-old spoke on a reunion show for “Keeping Up with the Kardashians,” which aired its last episode after 14 years on the air last week.

Spotify closes exclusive deal with podcast “Call Her Daddy”

Spotify Technology SA on Tuesday announced a multi-year contract to stream the popular “Call Her Daddy” podcast, hosted by Alex Cooper on its audio streaming platform, in its latest exclusive connection to keep listeners hooked. The Swedish The company will exclusively stream ‘Call Her Daddy’ starting July 21, including all full-length back catalog episodes, future episodes and additional exclusive new projects in development, Spotify said in a statement, without revealing any financial details of the deal.

Kevin Spacey’s accuser, who tried to sue anonymously, is released from the trial

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed all lawsuits from one of two men suing the actor Kevin Spacey for alleged sexual misconduct in the 1980s after the plaintiff refused to provide public identification. The discharge by US District Judge Lewis Kaplan in Manhattan came to lawyers for the man who was considered on court records. is known “CD” said revealing his identity would “suddenly attract unwanted attention” and “just be too much for him to endure”.

Miley Cyrus is allowed to use the name as a trademark in. use Europe after a long row

US pop star Miley Cyrus has won the right to use its name as a trademark on a wide variety of products in the United States European Unionafter Europe’s highest court on Wednesday annulled a decision by the EU patent office restricting the scope of their trademark. The case dates back to 2014 when the 28-year-old “Wrecking Ball” singing company Smiley Miley Inc. tried to capture MILEY CYRUS at the EU Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) for audio and video discs, mobile phone cases and e-books , electronic board games, calendars and other goods.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

Leisure Information Roundup: Harry Potter, ‘Associates’ might fall sufferer to Hungary’s anti-LGBT legislation: broadcaster; Diana Ross says ‘Thank You’ in new music after 15 years and extra

The following is a summary of the latest entertainment news.

Harry Potter, “Friends” could fall victim to Hungarian anti-LGBT law: broadcaster

The biggest channels in Hungary criticized a new law banning “displaying and promoting homosexuality” among 18-year-olds as a threat to freedom of expression, and one said it could affect some screenings. impact Harry Potter Movies and classic TV shows. The nationalist government of Prime Minister Viktor Orban passed the law on Tuesday despite criticism from human rights groups and the European Unionwho said this could lead to a loss of development funds for Hungary.

Diana Horse says ‘thank you’ in new music after 15 years

American singer Diana Horse expresses her gratitude in a new single “Thanks” released the title track of their first studio album in 15 years on Thursday. Horse, the former singer of the hugely successful group The Supremes from Motown Records, recorded the songs in her home studio during the COVID-19 pandemic. The album is described as “a powerful, comprehensive musical message of love and togetherness”.

Spotify closes exclusive deal with podcast “Call Her Daddy”

Spotify Technology SA on Tuesday announced a multi-year contract to stream the popular “Call Her Daddy” podcast, hosted by Alex Cooper on its audio streaming platform, in its latest exclusive connection to keep listeners hooked. The Swedish The company will exclusively stream ‘Call Her Daddy’ starting July 21, including all full-length back catalog episodes, future episodes and additional exclusive new projects in development, Spotify said in a statement, without revealing any financial details of the deal.

Miley Cyrus is allowed to use the name as a trademark in. use Europe after a long row

US pop star Miley Cyrus has won the right to use its name as a trademark on a wide variety of products in the United States European Unionafter Europe’s highest court on Wednesday annulled a decision by the EU patent office restricting the scope of their trademark. The case dates back to 2014 when the 28-year-old “Wrecking Ball” singing company Smiley Miley Inc. tried to capture MILEY CYRUS at the EU Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO) for audio and video discs, mobile phone cases and e-books , electronic board games, calendars and other goods.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is automatically generated from a syndicated feed.)

NAB Investigated For Potential Anti-Cash Laundering Regulation Breaches

By Alice Uribe

SYDNEY – The National Australia Bank Ltd. will undergo a formal review by the Australian Financial Intelligence Authority on concerns that it has violated anti-money laundering and terrorist financing regulations.

The Australian bank said AUSTRAC signaled in a letter dated Jan.

These concerns have been passed on to AUSTRAC’s enforcement team, which has opened a formal investigation, NAB said.

Nevertheless, AUSTRAC said in the letter that it had not made a decision as to whether enforcement measures would be taken and that, given the work of the NAB to date, it was not considering civil criminal proceedings.

Write to Alice Uribe at alice.uribe@wsj.com