The Island Boys Reveal The Weird Manner They Fashion Their Hair

the Island boys Don’t skimp when it comes to their looks. They always flash up with bling, designer threads, and grills. But one thing we didn’t expect was that they would style their hair themselves using an ordinary household item.

On Logan Paul’s Impaulsive podcast, the twins were asked how they manage to get their hair to stand the way they do. Her hair is her signature look so we would expect them to spend a lot of time and money on it. In fact, however, their unique style is down to something typical of grandmas – a crochet hook.

Co-host Mike Majlak then jokingly asked if they could get a TV signal through their hair, which made them laugh and play along.

They also said that many people at the school they attended had the same hairstyle.

That came before Franky and Alex stormed off the set after a heated discussion with Impaulsive co-moderator George Janko. Logan Paul asked them what they would do if their music career didn’t work for them, and George tried to give the twins friendly advice on what was going to get mad. They said they “don’t need financial advice”.

The Island Boys are considered to be worth together $ 100,000 in 2021. They recently did released their first official music video and turned down record deals because they said on TikTok that they would be fine enough without them.

Franky and Alex – aka Kodiyakredd and Flyysoulja – are 20-year-old fraternal twins from South Florida. Her parents are originally from Cuba, which inspired her song “I’m an Island Boy”.

Block Island to Jamestown: Man plans 19-mile swim to lift cash for Clear Ocean Entry

JAMESTOWN, RI (WPRI) – An endurance swimmer will soon attempt to be the first person to swim 30 miles non-stop from Block Island to Jamestown.

Ben Tuff has been training Saturday swimming every day for a year to raise funds and awareness for the nonprofit environment Access to the clean ocean.

In August 2019, he raised more than $ 54,000 for the cause while swimming 23 miles non-stop around Conanicut Island.

“It gives something back to the environment and everything that has given me,” said Tuff.

Similarly, local Olympian Elizabeth Beisel plans to swim to Block Island to raise money for cancer research

Tuff said he swim because he saw firsthand the beauty and fragility of the ocean he loves.

“All my summers growing up in Jamestown has been this beautiful setting, this water and the clarity of the water and the cleanliness of the water,” he recalls. “When I heard about Clean Ocean Access, I said, ‘I have to do something for this group’ and at the same time I said, ‘I have to do something crazy and something that others haven’t done.'”

He hopes this swim will inspire people to donate to help keep Rhode Island’s waters clean and accessible.

“Aside from the things you can’t control like weather, waves, sharks, jellyfish, you can control up to a point, and through training and spending time, you can accomplish any goal,” added Tuff.

Tuff’s dedication to marine conservation and his passion for incredible achievement caught the attention of Australian tech company Ocean Guardian, maker of the world’s only proven shark deterrent that he will wear throughout his swim.

“It makes muscle spasms and they don’t like it,” Tuff explained.

Atlantic Shark Institute executive director Jon Dodd said nine acoustic receivers placed around Block Island detected four great white sharks at the start of this year’s research, but only 5% of the great white sharks were tagged.

4 great white sharks spotted around Block Island

Tuff said he will be stung by schools of jellyfish based on previous endurance swimming.

However, he will not swim in the sea alone. His friend will paddle the route next to him with support ships nearby.

Tuff plans to start swimming early Saturday morning and hopefully finish by the afternoon. There are access points where anyone can stop to celebrate their progress before meeting them at the finish line.

  • Point Judith: First observation point
    • Ben won’t be seen until 10am at the earliest, but plan to be there around 9am
  • Newton Avenue: Second observation point
    • Ben won’t be seen until noon at the earliest
  • Pier: Third lookout point
    • Ben can be seen at 12:30 p.m. at the earliest
  • Beaver tail: target point
    • Ben won’t be ready to swim until 1:45 p.m. at the earliest
  • Finish Line Party: Memorial Square

Islesboro teenagers spent years elevating cash for his or her senior journey. As a substitute, they used the cash to vaccinate the island.

ISLESBORO, Maine – For the students at Islesboro Central School, the class trip is a really big deal.

Teenagers who go to school on the tiny island of Maine have visited places as exotic as Iceland, Norway and Panama in recent years. The school trip is something that students dream of and work towards for years by running fundraising drives.

“It definitely means a lot to all students,” said Olivia Britton, 17, a Belfast graduate, this week.

But the coronavirus pandemic has shaken travel and fundraising plans for both classes in 2020 and 2021. So instead of packing their bags, the 13 high school graduates did something special this spring.

They decided to donate much of the money they raised before the pandemic – a total of $ 5,000 – to the Islesboro Community Fund, which will use it to set up vaccine clinics on the island and help islanders in need.

The student donation helped pay for the administrative aspects of running the vaccine clinics, including purchasing personal protective equipment, transportation costs, and paying overtime for workers. The efforts have paid off. Islesboro has a 99% vaccination rate for COVID-19, according to the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

“I think the engagement of the Islesboro seniors is heartwarming,” said Owen Howell, medical assistant at Islesboro Health Center, who ran the clinics. “I think it’s selfless from them. You show wonderful leadership qualities in times of COVID. I know they would have loved to go on their journey. But they make the most of it and do something important with all the sweat it has cost. ”

The teens said they wanted to share their money with the community because it was the community that helped them raise it in the first place. They bought the concessions that high school seniors sold at home games and bought tickets to the spaghetti and Thanksgiving dinners they hosted.

“The island has supported us all along,” said Britton. “They came to all of our dinners and were very nice and busy with us. They didn’t mind if we screwed it up. ”

Liefe Temple, 18, of Lincolnville, another graduate, said it didn’t feel right for students to try other ideas.

“When it became clear we couldn’t use the money on a school trip, it felt really weird to use the money on something else or keep it for ourselves,” she said. “That’s not what the community gave us for.”

So they gave a lot of it back.

Your generosity meant a lot to the islanders, not only for what the money did, but also for the impetus behind the donation.

The 70-year-old Islesboro Community Fund helps residents in need who may have difficulty paying medical, fuel, or utility bills. It also supports a scholarship program to help young Islesboro teenagers meet expenses for higher education or post-secondary education.

“We had a running list of organizations,” said Temple. “We thought the community fund would make sense because they did all this COVID relief and COVID was the main reason we couldn’t make the trip.”

Islesboro Community Fund president Fred Thomas said the Class of 2021 donation specifically helped islanders facing unforeseen medical expenses and food security issues due to the pandemic. It also helped offset the cost of running the COVID-19 vaccination clinic on the island.

Islesboro Central School seniors practice marching prior to graduation, which will take place on Sunday, June 13th. Photo Credit: Courtesy Olivia Britton

“Everyone is very proud of them,” said Thomas. “I think it’s more than generous. Not only does it show maturity beyond their years, it also shows that these students are aware of the need in their community and are ready to do something about it. ”

He and others will officially recognize the students’ gift on Sunday, June 13, just before their high school graduation ceremony.

“Adults, those over 50, usually complain about today’s youth,” said Thomas. “I think the opposite is the case with these guys at least.”

For their part, the students thought it was cool that their donation helped the islanders get vaccinated and hope that with the money they have reserved they can do something as a class, which John van Dis, a science teacher at Islesboro Central School and one of the Senior Class Advisors, the estimate is between $ 2,000 and $ 3,000.

It won’t be a trip to Italy or Greece. But for the 2021 class, it’ll be a chance to do something fun with their friends before they blow up and leave high school behind for good.

“Many seniors have missed a lot. It was part of that kind of shared experience of the absence of rites of passage, ”said Britton. “We said it would be fun to play bowling, play mini golf, and get pizza.”

‘Dancing With the Stars’ — Staten Island-style — on the Alice Austen Home | Time Capsule: Staten Island

For several years, Staten Island had its own version of Dancing With the Stars, the hit ABC TV series that is still going strong after 15 years. It was a glittering gala at the Alice Austen House Museum in Rosebank.

June 14, 2008: Former South Shore Councilor Fred Cerullo and dance instructor Betteanne Fox dance the rumba one night with Dancing With the Stars.Staten Island Advance

The chic format saw local celebrity dancers paired with professional instructors strutting their things against the picturesque panoramic backdrop of the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge and New York Harbor. But Seaview’s Colony Hall only offered an alternative setting when it rained.

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 14, 2008: Aurelia Curtis and Kelly Gilmore dance the salsa during the Alice Austen House Museum’s annual fundraising gala “Dancing With the Stars”.Staten Island Advance

The proceeds from the soiree went to the Alice Austen Museum, a national historic landmark called “Clear Comfort” and the former home of renowned photographer Alice Austen, who allegedly cut a pretty good carpet herself.

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 14, 2008: Fran Reali and Kelly Gilmore dance the tango.Staten Island Advance

Cocktails flowed and appetizers were served under a lush tent, followed by polished performances, dinner and dancing – all on the luxurious lawn by the water.

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 20, 2009: Terry Tarangelo and Kelly Gilmore dance during the “Dancing With the Stars” gala at the Alice Austen House Museum at Seaview’s Colony Hall.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 20, 2009: Anthony Ferreri, Retired President of Staten Island University Hospital, and Maria Dorman dance during the Alice Austen House Museum’s “Dancing With the Stars” gala at Seaview’s Colony Hall. (Staten Island Advance / Bill Lyons)Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 20, 2009: Betteanne Fox and Robert Cutrona Sr. speak at Colony Hall, Sea View.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 20, 2011: Donald DeRosa and dance teacher Marisa Calabrese Shelley strut for an evening with “Dancing With the Stars” at Alice Austen House.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 20, 2011: Dance teachers Jeff Shelley and Donna Maxon perform during “Dancing With the Stars” at the Alice Austen House Museum.Staten Island Advance

The participants, adorned in their best splendor, paid homage to the big band era, with optimistic swing and other surprises that were part of the evening prize – judges recognizable in front of a jury.

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 14, 2012: Rehearsals at the M&J Ballroom Dance Studio owned by Marisa Calabrese-Shelley and Jeff Shelley in Dongan Hills are in full swing when “Dancing With the Stars” shows up at the Alice Austen House Museum in Rosebank. From left: dance instructors Vincent Laraia, Jeff Shelley and Maria Dorman, celebrity dancers Paul Scamardella, dance instructors Marisa Calabrese Shelley and celebrity dancers Cory Shifter.predicted Iceland

Rather than picking a winner, they offered wise observations and praised the dancers for their innovative dance style, grace, poise, and stage presence.

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 23, 2012: Corey Shifter dances with instructor Marisa Calabrese Shelley on an evening of “Dancing With the Stars” at Alice Austen House.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 23, 2012: – Attorney Lisa Giovinazzo dances with instructor Jeff Shelley at Alice Austen House.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 23, 2012: Lillian Lagazzo dances with instructor Jeff Shelley at Alice Austen House.Staten Island Advance

Time capsule / Staten Island

June 23, 2012: Gina Biancardi, founder and president of Casa Belvedere, dances with partners Vinny Laraia and Jeff Shelley at “Dancing With the Stars”.Staten Island Advance

Lengthy Island Cares Serving to Struggling Leisure Trade Professionals With Music Containers Of Meals – CBS New York

WANTAGH, NY (CBSNewYork) – Concert venues and live theaters are still closed so local musicians and performers, stage workers and others in the industry are struggling.

On Tuesday there was help for these people in the form of much-needed food.

CONTINUE READING: Anti-Asian attacks creating interest in self-defense classes, instructions for bystanders

Like Carolyn Gusoff from CBS2 before pandemic The Liverpool Shuffle booked 60 live gigs a year. COVID Turn them off for all but a few virtual concerts.

“It was just brutal and Long Island has been particularly hard hit. Long Island used to appear to be the center of the COVID universe, “said Joe Refano of the Liverpool Shuffle.

The first to close, the last to reopen, live musicians still have problems.

Are you eating?

Mulcahy’s in Wantagh has the dinner theater open, but many of their staff haven’t seen a paycheck in a year.

“Stage workers, lighting technicians, roadies, everything. Merch Sales, Managers … and they’re all unemployed, “said co-owner Tim Murray.

For her, Long Island takes care of it created an emergency response: Music Box of Meals. Several days of food, personal care products, even pet food.

SHORTCUT:: Long Island takes care of it

CONTINUE READING: Yankees announce COVID-19 security measures for home opener against Toronto on Thursday

“We will make sure they have enough food for their families and they can use this program as often and for as long as they need,” said Dr. Jessica Rosati of Long Island Cares.

Boxes can be picked up from places that have had so many benefit concerts to help others.

“Coming and asking for help may be embarrassing for some. You don’t want to admit that you need it, ”said Michele Rizzo-Berg of the Patchogue Theater.

Virtual events have paid some bills, but Long Island Cares predicts long-term help will be needed.

COVID VACCINATION

“This is the end of the line for many people in the entertainment and music business. No job and no feeling of hopelessness for more than 12 months, ”said Paule Pachter, CEO of Long Island Cares.

Long Island Cares, a natural partnership, was founded by the late, great Harry Chapin, who lived by the ideal of giving back.

“Music is in our roots and we want to make sure local artists and entertainers have the help they need,” said Rosati.

If you or someone you know in the industry needs assistance, you can call Long Island Cares at 631-582-FOOD. It will assess the need and direct you to one of the places where boxes can be picked up.

MORE NEWS: Feds: NYC Congestion Pricing Plan May Go Forward

Long Island Cares has so far fed an additional 270,000 people during the pandemic.

Mates of Island increase cash for brand new indicators | Native Information

Friends of Island advocacy is accepting donations for new street and stop signs near the Bobby Veach Field ballpark.

They have installed seven new signs on Main Street in the past two to three years, according to Scott Hillard, a member of the FOI.

The original target was $ 2,000, but due to an increase in freight, the current target is $ 2,125.

Hillard said the nonprofit Island Community Development Association sponsored one of the characters on March 15. With this sponsorship, FOI is $ 600 away from its current goal.

“We would like to express our deepest appreciation to the Island Community Development Association and its members for joining our efforts by sponsoring one of the two road mail signs on the ball field,” FOI said in a Facebook post. “They were instrumental in renovating the toilets and doing the extra work needed next to the island town that keeps the field looking good.”

The baseball stadium was renamed after the island-born baseball outfielder Veach in 2019 when the new shield was erected.

“Our goal is to resume the tradition in the months and years to come,” explained FOI.

The main focus of FOI was on improving downtown Iceland.

Hillard said they hope to have the new signs installed by April.

“We’d like to draw attention to our ball field again, because Iceland was where everyone played baseball and softball for decades,” he said.

People interested in donating can send money through PayPal at FriendsOfIsland or by check to Friends of Island at PO Box 106 Island, KY 42350.

Mates of Island elevate cash for brand new indicators | Information

Friends of Island advocacy is accepting donations for new street and stop signs near the Bobby Veach Field ballpark.

They have installed seven new signs on Main Street in the past two to three years, according to Scott Hillard, a member of the FOI.

The original destination was $ 2,000, but due to an increase in freight, the current destination is $ 2,125.

Hillard said the nonprofit Island Community Development Association sponsored one of the characters on March 15. With this sponsorship, FOI is $ 600 away from its current goal.

“We would like to express our deepest appreciation to the Island Community Development Association and its members for joining our efforts by sponsoring one of the two road mail signs on the ball field,” FOI said in a Facebook post. “They were instrumental in renovating the toilets and doing the extra work needed next to the island town that keeps the field looking good.”

The ballpark was renamed in 2019 after the island-born baseball player Veach. That was when the new shield was erected.

“Our goal is to resume the tradition in the months and years to come,” said FOI.

The main focus of FOI was on improving downtown Iceland.

Hillard said they hope to have the new signs installed by April.

“We’d like to draw attention to our ball field again, because Iceland was where everyone played baseball and softball for decades,” he said.

People interested in donating can send money through PayPal at FriendsOfIsland or by check to Friends of Island at PO Box 106 Island, KY 42350.

Fort Smith Board approves more cash for Parrot Island water slide

The Fort Smith Board of Directors voted to fund a new slide at Parrot Island Waterpark. The City and College of Sebastian County each previously voted to allocate $ 250,000 to expand Parrot Island Waterpark with a new liner upon completion of the FlowRider amenity.

The $ 250,000 for the expansion was included in the city’s budget for 2021. However, it will require an additional $ 220,833 to build the slide the city needs, deputy city administrator Jeff Dingman told the board on Tuesday, March 16, at the city’s regular board meeting.

The original plan for the new slide was to replace the yellow “body slide” in the park with new fiberglass for a “tube slide”. The new foil would fall off the existing foil tower, which can only serve four foils. The yellow slide has been changed and is now working properly, Dingman said.

“We prefer to keep it operational and add a new fifth slide to the park rather than replace one of the original four slides,” said Dingman.

The new slide will be the first tube slide for the park. However, building a new slide requires an additional, separate slide tower and support structure for the pump house.

“These items are being created with future expansion in mind, making it relatively easy to add up to three additional slides in the future,” said Dingman in a memo of the project’s budget.

The city’s total share of the foil expansion project is expected to be $ 470,833, Dingman said.

“Sales were expected to drop significantly in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which resulted in departments cutting their budgets to absorb the forecast economic shock. However, Fort Smith failed to realize that the expected economic impact of the pandemic and sales tax revenue were above sales estimates. Therefore, an allocation from the additional (budgeted above) sales tax revenue for parks generated in both 2020 and 2021 is required to fund the additional amount the city needs to expand Parrot Island water park, ”Dingman said in the memo .

The additional funding won’t take away any money for planned park projects in 2021, said Doug Reinert, director of Parks & Recreation. The board unanimously approved the regulation for the additional funds.

In November, City Administrator Carl Geffken informed directors that Parrot Island was having a difficult 2020 fiscal year due to the pandemic. It had 59,248 visitors and total sales of $ 1.003 million for the year. At a total cost of $ 1.301, the park ended the season in a deficit of $ 297,973. However, Settle and Geffken found this was an anomaly and the park had made money every two years. In 2019, Parrot Island had total sales of $ 1.351 million and total sales of $ 1.273 million for net income of $ 77,527. The attendance in 2019 was 91,589.

Mayor George McGill also announced at the meeting that the city would host a second mass COVID vaccination clinic on May 5th. The city hosted a COVID-19 vaccination clinic at the Fort Smith Convention Center on February 24. There will be a clinic on Wednesday (March 17th) for those who received their first shot at this clinic and need their second shot.

Neil Younger’s misplaced album Johnny’s Island set for launch | Leisure

Neil Young will release the lost album ‘Johnny’s Island’.

The 75-year-old music legend recorded the tracks in Honolulu’s Commercial Recorders Studio, Hawaii, during the same sessions for his 1982 LP ‘Trans’.

The collection was previously called “Island In The Sun” and some of the songs made back then, like “Like An Inca”, “Hold On To Your Love” and “Little Thing Called Love” ended up on “Trans” ‘.

The album is now being released “soon” in all its glory through the Neil Young Archives.

Neil announced on his website for the project: “‘Johnny’s Island’, a full album currently being prepared for release in NYA, contains the majority of the unreleased tracks including ‘Big Pearl’, ‘Island In The Sun’ and ‘Love Hotel’. And others that you may have heard before. It’s a nice record that will come to you soon. “

In December, Neil made his music archive available for free on his website for the remainder of 2020.

The folk icon gave his fans his entire career online for Christmas to feel a little at ease during the COVID-19 pandemic.

He said at the time: “We are fine here and we feel good. We hope you are doing well too.

“When you are locked up, we are there for you and can watch movies for hours and drive through the years. We want you to enjoy what we have to share in NYA … It’s my music and our life. Peace.”

Releases included the Archives Volume II: 1972-1976 box set and his Fireside Sessions, which included a cover of Bob Dylan’s “The Times They Are A-Changin”.

Meanwhile, Neil recently sold 50 percent of his music catalog, valued at an estimated $ 150 million (£ 110 million), to the Hipgnosis Songs Fund.

Half of Neil’s music collection is 1,180 songs.

Island Calendar: Issues to Do on Nantucket This Month – Leisure – The Inquirer and Mirror

MONDAY, JAN. 25th

Your posture and sciatica
8:30 am Click here to register. Massage therapist and wellness trainer Rachel Dixon will talk about sciatica and its relationship to posture, and offer exercises for relief.

Delicious Monday
7 p.m. Click here to register. The library staff will share their favorite dishes on the screen and encourage you to cook your favorite food from the movies. Suggestions include “Big Night”, “Julie & Julia”, “Chocolat” and “The Waitress”.

TUESDAY, JAN. 26th

Music in the morning
9:45 am Click to see on zoom. Lizza Obremski performs for half an hour of fun and gripping songs, singing games and exercise activities for ages 1 to 7 years.

Name this melody
10:30 a.m. Click here to register. Paul Connors will play some chords from music from 1890 to 1960 and participants will write down their answers and discuss them at the end.

Online tea and tarot
7-9pm Click here to register. Danica Connors, who has been reading Tarot personally and professionally for over 30 years, will cover some of the basics in the first lesson and more advanced topics in the second. Beginners and experienced tarot card readers are welcome.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27

“Breaking up a complex mess”
7 p.m. Click here to register. Sara Schoen will explain how statistics can help create new tools for defining clear differences between species. This is the only way to understand declining populations and define the biological diversity in an area. The host is the Maria Mitchell Association.

THURSDAY, JAN. 28

Nan dolls
9:45 am Click to see on zoom. Lizza Obremski and her doll friends lead half an hour full of fun and stories suitable for children from 2 to 7 years old.

Teen trivia and games
3 p.m. Click here to register. Adolescents in grades 6 through 12 are invited to an hour of play, including Among Us, Geoguessr, Trivia, and a quiz on current events.

House history workshop
5:30 p.m. Click here to register. The Nantucket Historical Association, Housing Nantucket, the Museum of African American History, the Nantucket Atheneum and the Nantucket Preservation Trust present this workshop on researching the history of island properties. Speakers Amelia Holmes, Betsy Tyler, and Lincoln Thurber will cover a variety of resources available to researchers, using the recently renovated 27 York St. Boston-Higginbotham House as an example of a research property.

Open house on the coast
5:30 p.m. Click here to register. The city will host an open house for the Nantucket Coastal Resilience Plan. The project team will present the project and provide opportunities for interactive feedback from community members.

FRIDAY, JAN. 29

Online digital photography course
9 a.m. Click here to register. Janie Hobson Dupont shows how to take portraits and close-ups with an iPhone.

Email calendar items to newsroom@inkym.com

Click here to sign up for Above the Fold, The Inquirer and Mirror’s bi-weekly newsletter, which brings you the news, a slice of island life and is curated with content curated by Nantucket’s only team of professionally trained journalists were created.

For the latest information on the breaking news from Nantucket, boat and aircraft cancellations, weather warnings, sports and entertainment news, island company offers and promotions, and more, visit Inquiries and Mirrors. Click here