Austin eating places assist increase cash for Louisiana fisherman affected by Hurricane Ida

AUSTIN (KXAN) – On Monday night, Austin restaurants teamed up to serve fishermen hit by Hurricane Ida.

A benefit tasting was held at Justine’s Secret House to raise funds.

Adam Brick works for a seafood-based wholesale company in central Texas. He helped organize the event.

According to Brick, many local restaurants work with a select group of fishermen in southwest Louisiana – many of whom lost their boats during Ida.

“All we are trying to do is get the fishermen paid so they can focus and make the right decisions to get their boats fishing again. And they can focus on their families and they can focus on doing the right things and not have to worry about getting a paycheck in the next few weeks or something, ”Brick said.

brick has also set up a GoFundMe for Austinites who want to help.

To date, $ 2,100 has been raised online. The goal is $ 20,000.

Native New Orleans type restaurant raises funds for Hurricane Ida

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) – Southern hospitality and those who offer it always have something special about them.

“I was born and raised in New Orleans. I’ve lived there for 25 years, ”said Andrew Boyer, owner of NOLA on Jan.

Boyer picked up his draw after living in the 504 and later traded it for the 619. When he saw the devastation that Category 4 Hurricane Ida wreaked havoc on his old turf, there was pain for Crescent City.

“I went back to Katrina and I was the devastation and I saw the heartache, basically the depression, and that kind of reminded me of it,” Boyer said.

He wanted to help after Ida swept his home state.

“I listen to my friends; we have no water, we have no electricity,” said Boyer.

So, Boyer’s Restaurant serves up jambalaya, gumbo, etouffee, and more from its New Orleans Comfort menu for charity.

“All items sold, we not just give the proceeds, we will give 50 percent of the sales to the Cajun Navy and the American Red Cross.”

NOLA on May 5th is making this Labor Day weekend appeal to all of their hungry customers looking for their own taste of bayou.

“We left Grace two weeks ago and we know how it was. And I know how influenced people are, ”said Ashley Renae, a customer. “So we wanted to come out, get good food and support them. “

“Any money we can give to help people would be fantastic,” said Jaqi Price, another customer.

It’s a sight that Boyer is overjoyed at. Proof that there is nothing a bowl of gumbo cannot fix.

“To see people who have no connection with Louisiana giving money and so we are here to eat, it is just touching. It just means that people really care, ”Boyer said.

NOLA said on the 5th that the fundraising effort will also apply to takeaway orders of their New Orleans Comfort Food. Customers can call them to place your order for a good cause.

They’re also doing a pass-the-pot event for the LSU game on Saturday to raise funds for their fundraising effort.

Cajun Phatty’s in Billings elevating cash for victims of Hurricane Ida

BILLINGS – Cajun Phatty’s have served the Billings community for 10 years and now they serve the communities devastated by Hurricane Ida.

Cajun Phatty’s started out as a food truck and then grew into a restaurant located on 2564 King Ave. W.

Owner Ashley Robichaux, a native of New Iberia, Louisiana, is actively raising funds for two different groups: her friends and the Cajun Navy, a volunteer group that helps with search and rescue.

Both support those affected by Hurricane Ida with water, food, fuel and other necessary supplies.

The donation doesn’t stop there: Robichaux has also helped the Louisiana communities during previous hurricanes.

If you want to donate to the cause, go to Cajun Phatty’s Facebook page or better yet, stop by for a bite to eat to show your support.

New Orleans-Impressed Restaurant in San Diego Goals to Increase Cash for Hurricane Ida Reduction – NBC 7 San Diego

San Diego is a long way from Louisiana, but a Hillcrest restaurant keeps the New Orleans community up for victims through a fundraiser Hurricane Ida.

NOLA On 5. – located at 3683 5th Ave., south of Pennsylvania Avenue – is working with the American Red Cross Thursday to raise funds for Ida relief efforts. From September 2nd to 5th, daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., the restaurant will donate 50% of sales of its New Orleans Comfort Food menu to the American red cross.

A Hurricane Katrina survivor who now lives in San Diego recalls the storm and worries about the aftermath of Hurricane Ida. Allie Raffa from NBC 7 reports.

You see, the co-owner of the New Orleans-inspired restaurant – Andrew Boyer – is a retired New Orleans resident and wants to do what he can to help after Ida’s devastation.

“Our thoughts go with those affected by Ida and the entire Louisiana community,” said a message posted on Restaurant Instagram feed.

Hurricane Ida left a lot of damage in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana – devastating buildings and roads.

On Saturday, a local chapter of Louisiana State University alumni will participate in the restaurant’s fundraiser; the alumni will also collect money for Ida aid during the LSU vs. UCLA soccer game from 5:30 p.m.

NOLA On 5th specializes in Louisiana dishes such as catfish, po’boys, Mediterranean style lobster and chicken. Jambalaya, Gumbo, red beans, and rice are also on the menu.

Ida swept through Louisiana on Sunday, leaving New Orleans without power.

To learn more about how to donate directly through the American Red Cross to Hurricane Ida relief efforts, Click here.

Hurricane Ida: What You Should Know

Hurricane Ida landed on August 29th – the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina. A few days later hundreds of thousands of Louisians were braising with no electricity, no tap water and little gasoline.

Ida was the fifth strongest hurricane hit the US and its devastation continues to be widespread. More than 1 million Homes and businesses in Louisiana and Mississippi were left without power. At some point New Orleans fell into complete darkness.

The death toll rose dramatically through Thursday as remains of the Hurricane Ida devastated the northeastern United States with record-breaking rains and floods.

Police said nine people died in New York City and 14 confirmed deaths in New Jersey. Check out the latest updates on Ida-related deaths Here.

In the meantime, President Joe Biden will visit Louisiana on Friday to assess the aftermath and speak to local and state leaders.

On Thursday, the president spoke about his administration’s efforts to protect the areas hit by Hurricane Ida (as well as those affected by Caldor fire in the Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe).

“We’re all sticking together,” said Bide. “The nation is here to help.”

President Joe Biden described his administration’s efforts to provide federal aid to competing climate crises in the United States, including historic floods from Hurricane Ida in the southern and eastern states and the devastating Caldor Fire in Sierra Nevada. “We’re all in the same boat. The nation is here to help.”

Hurricane Ida causes provide shortages, officers warn of lengthy restoration

A rescue team member helps evacuate a woman after Hurricane Ida on Jan.

Marco Bello | Reuters

Communities in the southeast have been hit by Hurricane Ida after the storm system devastated power grids and water systems in the scorching heat.

More than a million customers in Louisiana were without power, like that PowerOutage.us. About 52,000 power losses in Mississippi.

Since Ida hit land on Sunday, utility teams have moved in to assess the damage to the city’s electricity grid, a process that will likely take days, according to the electricity company Entergy. The restoration of the electrical transmission will “take much longer,” said the company in a tweet on Monday.

In the meantime, eighteen water systems have failed, affecting more than 312,000 people, and another 14 systems serving 329,000 people have been under boiling water advice Associated Press reported. Local residents are rushing to find fresh drinking water and ice, as well as long-life food.

Petrol for filling cars or generators is also becoming more and more difficult. That is, regional prices are expected temporarily rise, said the American Automotive Association.

“There’s no point in staying,” one resident told CNBC Frank Holland when refueling. “Our water is rubbish. It’s just too hard to stay here.”

Highway 51 will flood in LaPlace, Louisiana after Hurricane Ida on August 30, 2021.

Mickey Welsh | Montgomery Advertiser | USA TODAY network via Reuters

All of this happens in the sweltering late summer heat. Heat warnings were in effect for some parts of Louisiana and Mississippi where heat index values ​​could reach 106 degrees.

Ida hit land over Port Fourchon, Louisiana as a Category 4 storm with winds reaching 250 mph, one of the strongest storms to hit the region since Hurricane Katrina, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said. The storm has been downgraded to a tropical depression and is moving across the Tennessee River Valley and is expected to trigger heavy rainfall in the Ohio and Tennessee valleys and through the central Atlantic region through Wednesday.

Hurricane Ida makes landfall in Louisiana as a powerful Class four storm

Traffic moves bumper to bumper along I-10 West as residents evacuate toward Texas ahead of the arrival of Hurricane Ida in Vinton, Louisiana.

Adrees Latif | REUTERS

Hurricane Ida landed in Louisiana on Sunday as a Category 4 storm with winds reaching 250 mph, one of the strongest storms to hit the region since Hurricane Katrina, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said.

The National Hurricane Center warned on Sunday A life-threatening storm surge of nine feet or more from Burns Point, Louisiana to Ocean Springs, Mississippi, is expected at 11 a.m. ET and could potentially topple local levees.

Hurricane-force winds hit the southeastern Louisiana coast on Sunday morning before the storm hit land near Port Fourchon, Louisiana.

In the past hour, sustained winds of 43 mph and a gust of 67 mph have been reported at New Orleans’ Lakefront Airport. Ida was about 15 miles southwest of Grand Isle, Louisiana, and about 72 km southeast of Houma, Louisiana, the Hurricane Center said.

Ida landed on the anniversary of Katrina, the dangerous Category 3 storm that devastated Louisiana and Mississippi 16 years ago, killing more than 1,800 people and causing $ 125 billion in damage.

Ida’s strength and path will be a major test of flood control from New Orleans to Katrina, including levees, flood walls, and gates built to protect against storms. Katrina had broken levees and caused catastrophic flooding in New Orleans.

Ida has also raised concerns about the city’s hospitals, which are already overwhelmed with Covid-19 patients and have little space for evacuated patients. Emergency shelters in Louisiana are operating at reduced capacity due to the pandemic, although state officials are working to secure hotel rooms for evacuees.

Ida intensified so quickly that officers did not have time to order mandatory evacuations. New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell ordered a mandatory evacuation for a small portion of the city outside the levee system, but said there was no time to enact one for the entire city.

All Sunday flights were also canceled due to the approaching storm, New Orleans Airport announced on Saturday.

president Joe Biden has declared a state of emergency for Louisiana and Mississippi, a move that empowers the Department of Homeland Security and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to coordinate all disaster relief efforts.

“The storm is a life-threatening storm,” said the president on Sunday at a briefing at FEMA headquarters. “The devastation is likely to be immense. Everyone should listen to instructions from local and state officials.”

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards said Saturday the storm would be one of the strongest to hit the state since at least the 1850s.

A resident picks up sandbags home from a city-operated sandbag distribution point on Dryades YMCA along Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., Friday, Aug. 27, 2021 in New Orleans as residents prepare for Hurricane Ida.

Max Becherer | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans attorney via AP

National Weather Service forecasters “are extremely confident about the current route and intensity forecast for Hurricane Ida, and you don’t hear them talk very often about that level of confidence,” Edwards said during an afternoon press conference.

Harmful winds will spread to southwest Mississippi on Sunday night and early Monday, likely causing widespread tree damage and power outages, as well as heavy rains and expected across the central Gulf Coast, the Hurricane Center said.

As the storm moves inland, the Hurricane Center is forecasting significant flooding in parts of the lower Mississippi, Tennessee Valley, upper Ohio Valley, central Appalachian Mountains and the mid-Atlantic by Wednesday, according to the Hurricane Center.

Ida is the first major storm to hit the Gulf Coast during the 2021 Atlantic hurricane season. The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season was the most active on record, with 30 named storms, including 13 hurricanes.

Scientists warn of increasingly dangerous hurricane seasons as climate change fuels more frequent and catastrophic storms. NOAA expects between 15 and 21 named storms, including seven to ten hurricanes, in the 2021 season.

This story evolves. Please check again for updates.

Oil companies lower U.S. Gulf of Mexico output by 91% forward of Hurricane Ida

Oil companies on Saturday cut nearly 91% of US crude oil production in the Gulf of Mexico, approximately 1.65 million barrels as Hurricane Ida is heading for large U.S. offshore oil fields, according to the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement.

The regulator also estimated that approximately 84.87% of natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico has been shut down.

Ida is expected to hit a Category 4 hurricane before making landfall west of New Orleans. Louisiana residents on Saturday hurried to prepare for the stormthat could bring winds of up to 225 km / h when it hits land.

Oil and gas companies evacuated 279 production platforms, representing 49.82% of the 560 manned platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, and stopped nearly 91% of their typical offshore production as the storm approached, according to the offshore regulator.

The companies also moved 11 drillships off the site and out of the storm’s path on Saturday.

The Gulf of Mexico’s offshore oil production accounts for 17% of the country’s crude oil production and 5% of the state’s offshore dry gas production. corresponding the US Energy Information Agency.

Andrew Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates in Houston, said Saturday that gas prices in the southeast and mid-Atlantic markets would likely rise by about 10 cents a gallon if a Category 4 storm hit New Orleans refineries directly.

Elsa now not hurricane, Miami-Dade getting ready as rental collapse search continues

Probability of storm winds from Hurricane Elsa

Source: NOAA

Elsa weakened to tropical storm strength, but continued plowing towards Haiti and the Dominican Republic on Saturday, a day after reaching the Caribbean island states of Barbados and St. Vincent.

The long-term forecast showed it was sailing towards Florida as a tropical storm until Tuesday morning, but some models would carry it to the Gulf or the Atlantic coast.

Florida officials have also warned the potential impact of winds could hamper search and rescue operations the collapsed condo in Surfside, Florida.

“Our business continuity management department expects this to happen and is making the necessary preparations to protect a large part of the equipment. They could possibly host an event with the building, ”said Florida Governor Ron DeSantis on Friday.

Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava signed a local state of emergency on Saturday that will allow the county to mobilize resources if necessary while search and rescue operations continue in the rubble of a partially collapsed 12-story residential complex.

“The path is still very uncertain, but we continue to monitor closely and if there is a potential impact on Miami-Dade, we are ready,” said Cava during a press conference.

The Category 1 storm was located approximately 40 miles southeast of Island Beta in the Dominican Republic and was moving west to west at 11 a.m. EST on Saturday, at 29 mph, according to the US National Hurricane Center (NHC). The agency reported maximum sustained winds of 70 mph as the tropical storm, which had been a Category 1 hurricane the previous Saturday, weakened as it approached Hispaniola and Cuba.

The NHC warned that conditions would likely worsen in the coming hours. Elsa’s forward speed was expected to decrease later on Saturday, while the maximum wind speeds would stay about the same through Sunday or Monday.

DeSantis told reporters on Saturday the state was preparing for a large tropical storm that includes isolated tornadoes, storm surges, heavy rains and flash floods.

“We hope the storm doesn’t have much runway to gain that speed and strength before it hits our peninsula,” he added.

– The Associated Press contributed to this report.