Lab-grown meat start-ups hope to make strides in 2022

Josh Tetrick, co-founder and CEO of cultured meat startup Eat Just, has a vision: he envisions a day when lab-raised meat is available everywhere from Michelin-star restaurants to street vendors and fast food chains .

Getting there, however, will require further investment – ​​and regulatory approvals. Cultured or cultured meats are real animal products made in laboratories and commercial manufacturing facilities. Currently, the process is costly, but researchers and entrepreneurs say manufacturing will become more efficient and cost-effective over time. If consumers switch to cultured meat, it could help reduce greenhouse gases from agriculture and mitigate climate change.

“It’s not inevitable,” Tetrick said in an interview. “This could take 300 years or 30 years. It’s up to companies like ours to do the actual work of building the tech capability…and communicating directly with consumers about what it is and isn’t, and how it can benefit their lives.”

Investors have poured around $2 billion into space over the past two years, according to Crunchbase data. The coming year will bring further investments. Eat Just and others are working to obtain regulatory approval in the United States from the Food and Drug Administration and the Department of Agriculture.

Nick Cooney, managing partner at LeverVC, which invests in the sector, said he expects approval later this year.

“There are several companies in this space that are building large, pilot-scale plants to make cultured meat products, but to produce in fairly large quantities that’s going to take a lot of capital investment and a lot of steel, and that’s just going to take time,” he said.

Eat Just has made major breakthroughs over the last two years. In Singapore it is received its first regulatory approval in December 2020 for its cultured chicken from Good Meat and has since received approval to sell new types of cultured chicken there, including chicken breasts, tenders and shredded chicken products.

“It’s real meat,” Tetrick said. “And instead of taking billions of animals and all the land and water and all the rainforests that you usually have to tear down to get that done, we’re starting with one cell. You can obtain the cell from a biopsy of an animal, such as a fresh piece of meat or a cell bank. Now we don’t need the animal anymore. Then we identify the nutrients needed to nourish that cell and … we make them in a stainless steel vessel called a bioreactor.”

Eat Just also sells mung bean plant-based egg products at stores like Whole Foods and Publix in the US and employs more than 200 people.

To date, more than 700 people in Singapore are said to have been provided with its cultured meat products — a number Tetrick hopes to increase quickly as it wins approvals in other countries.

After approval, Eat Just said it has already laid the groundwork to take off. The company’s Good Meat Division last year announced a $267 million capital raise to build containers and systems that will ramp up production in both the United States and Singapore, where it currently manufactures aiming to have this equipment operational within the next two years. In August, the company also announced it would build a facility in Qatar in partnership with Doha Venture Capital and the Qatar Free Zones Authority, but much more capital is needed to build bioreactors big enough to scale.

According to the nonprofit research association The Good Food Institute, more than 100 start-ups are working on cultured meat products, and larger companies are also expanding their own operations.

JBS, the global protein giant, acquired BioTech Foods in late 2021, Invest $100 million to enter the cultured meat market and set up a research and development center in Brazil. The Spanish biotech company is another leader in the cultured food sector and is focused on developing biotechnology for the production of cultured meat.

These developments come as consumers are increasingly concerned about climate change and want to change their eating habits to combat it. Plant-based meat products have become ubiquitous, appear in menus like KFC‘s or the grocery aisle at Turn Up aim. Cultured meat could offer Americans another alternative, and with products from companies such as B. coexist Beyond meat and impossible foods.

“The world will not reach net-zero emissions without addressing food and land,” said Caroline Bushnell, vice president of corporate engagement at the Good Food Institute.

“The role of our food system in climate change is generally underestimated, but industrial animal husbandry makes an important contribution,” she said. “Alternative proteins, including cultured meats, can be a key aspect of how we reduce emissions from our food system. Without a decline in industrial meat production, we cannot really meet our commitments under the Paris climate agreement.”

Chef Jose Andres, a restaurateur and founder of the nonprofit humanitarian group World Central Kitchen, wants to be part of this solution. Last month he joined the board of Eat Just’s Good Meat division and has pledged to sell the cultured chicken at one of his US restaurants pending regulatory review.

Promises like these can help bring Tetrick closer to his vision. But costs must also come down.

“A local restaurant or a big fast-food chain won’t take that if it’s a lot more expensive than regular meat. They’ll take it when it’s close — or better yet, when it’s under the cost. And that’s what we have to fight for,” said Andres.

La Scala pronounces 2021-21 season, with hope of fewer limits | Leisure




A view of Milan’s La Scala opera house during a press conference to present the 2021/2022 season in Milan, Italy, Monday 31 May 2021.




A view of Milan’s La Scala opera house during a press conference to present the 2021/2022 season in Milan, Italy, Monday 31 May 2021.




Scala announces the 2021-21 season, with the hope of fewer limits

From left, the Italian conductor Riccardo Chailly, the Mayor of Milan Giuseppe Sala and the General Director of the La Scala Opera House, Dominique Meyer, take part in a press conference about the 2021/2022 season on Monday 31 May 2021 at the La Scala Opera House in Milan present in Milan.




Scala announces the 2021-21 season, with the hope of fewer limits

A view of Milan’s La Scala opera house during a press conference to present the 2021/2022 season in Milan, Italy, Monday 31 May 2021.

From COLLEEN BARRY Associated Press

MILAN (AP) – Milan’s famous Teatro alla Scala announced a 2021-22 season of 13 operas, seven ballets and numerous concerts on Monday, as Italy’s premier theater seeks to gradually lift pandemic restrictions.

Audiences returned to La Scala last month, and the next major step will be for the theater to remove the floor from the main seating area, where the entire orchestra played on risers and with plexiglass partitions between woodwinds and brass, at social distance.

“It will be the end of this terrible experience,” said Riccardo Chailly, Scala music director.

The conductor was placed about 30 meters away from the musicians, and the musicians were placed at a distance from one another where they could not hear each other properly in order to play, which is especially challenging during complicated executions, noted Chailly.

“It means creating music by 100 musicians without being able to hear. This has not been emphasized enough. The orchestra went to great lengths and no one got into emotional excess, ”Chailly said, praising and thanking both of them.

The theater is currently limited to around 2,000 seats for 500 spectators. The time for a further relaxation of the restrictions lies with government officials, emphasized Director General Dominique Meyer. For the fall end of the 2020-21 season, however, Scala is focusing on music that requires less than a full orchestra to meet future distancing requirements.

Hope Lodge elevating cash to reopen for households of most cancers sufferers

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again. “Giving Hope a Home.” That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment. “This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas. She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer. Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer. “We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.” Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress. “There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.” The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen. “So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright. He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back. “It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.” The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help now by donating here.

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again.

“Giving Hope a Home.”

That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment.

“This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas.

She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer.

Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer.

“We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.”

Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress.

“There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.”

The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen.

“So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright.

He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back.

“It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.”

The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help through now donate here.

With extra ‘hope cash’ from feds on the horizon, South Dakota’s transportation fee OKs changing 31 bridges

“We know we have a number of bridges in disrepair,” said Tammy Williams, SDDOT program manager, during a meeting of the South Dakota Transportation Commission Thursday, April 29th. But Williams told the commission that federal grants could be in excess of $ 30 million annually for the next four years.

When asked how reliable this funding could be, she replied, “However, we are programming for it … and we just hope.”

“Hope money,” interjected Commissioner Mike Vehleto laugh at.

The bridges of the state of South Dakota are more sobering, however.

A national trade group released a report Earlier this year, South Dakota was found to have the fourth worst rating of structurally weak bridges in the country.

And while the congress is debating duel infrastructure approaches – President Biden announces he plans to spend more than $ 2 trillion while Republicans of the Senate have proposed a reduced $ 500 billion plan – South Dakotans, who depend on federal dollars for bridge funding, listen.

State officials said that on Thursday deteriorated conditions are not largely found in the inventory of around 1,800 directly owned by the state.

“Our government structures are in pretty good shape,” SDDOT’s chief bridge engineer Steve Johnson told the commission.

However, conditions are becoming more precarious for the 3,900 buildings in counties or cities where the average bridge age (51 years) is seven years older than the national average (44). On Thursday, Williams said that 25% of that inventory is classified as “in poor condition” by the state.

“The county system came a little earlier,” Williams said, noting that roads and associated bridges were built from the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s, decades before the highway system on which many state structures rest. “Many of the local structures date from this time.”

But she said they are “making progress”.

Last year, a federal-local program funded the repair of 49 structures. On Thursday, the commission unanimously approved the approval of $ 21.5 million 31 Replacing structures – and remove another 11 – currently in the public inventory of the bridges and place them in the coming year Planning budget.

“It’s good business,” Williams commented.

The bridges, she said, were selected by a scoring system that awarded applicants points based on the condition of the bridge and its “impact on the user”. The bridges awarded include a number that crosses the various waterways, which state officials in certain areas of South Dakota have identified as a constant challenge.

“If you look at the east side of the state, you can actually see the major rivers that flow through South Dakota and the tributaries that flow into them,” noted Mike Behm, director of the planning and engineering division who provided the commission on Thursday with a structure condition report summarizing the conditions of the 5,700 public bridges in South Dakota that cover 82,000 miles of carriageway.

Of the 31 bridges to be replaced, four cross Wolf Creek in rural Hand County, while others include structures that span the Big Sioux and Miller Creek in Spearfish.

Value hikes forward, however client firms hope consumers will not discover

Shoppers search for items at a Costco wholesale store on August 4, 2020 in Colchester, Vermont.

Robert Nickelsberg | Getty Images

Inflation is coming.

Look no further than coke and Procter & Gamble share plans to raise prices this week to compensate for rising raw material costs. The cost of raw materials, which range from lumber to resin, is rising, and companies are taking steps to protect profits.

The price increases follow a year of increasing demand for a variety of items, from paper towels to peanut butter jars. Sale of Consumer goods rose 9.4% to $ 1.53 trillion last year according to the Consumer Brands Association. Many manufacturers withdrew advertising and promotions to keep up with demand and gain market share without much marketing.

James Knightley, chief economist at ING International, predicts consumer prices will continue to rise in the near future, up nearly 4% year over year by May. The consumer price index, which is how much US consumers pay for a shopping cart, rose 2.6% in March from the same period last year according to the Ministry of Labor.

The stocks are “too low”.

Low inventory levels help companies improve their pricing power, he said.

“According to the Institute for Supply Management, the latest survey found that 40% of manufacturers say their customer inventories are” too low, “” Knightley said. “This is further evidence that corporate pricing power is increasing.”

Food industry analyst Phil Lempert said numerous factors have increased costs for farmers who pick produce, factories that make packaged consumer goods, and meat packers who process beef, pork and chicken. The ports are congested, the truck drivers are scarce and the food workers have to try to distance themselves socially. That makes it harder to keep up with demand and ship items, from cereals to Italian cheeses, worldwide.

Price increases are secret

Moody’s analyst Linda Montag said she does not see higher prices as a competitive advantage as all consumer businesses face higher raw material costs. In addition to Cola and P & G PepsiCo, Kimberly-Clark, General Mills and JM Smucker have dealt with price increases. And consumers may not even realize they are paying more for diapers or soda.

“Consumer companies across the board are very adept at implementing price increases without having to forego price increases of five to 10%,” Montag said in an interview.

Some of these methods include using new packaging, selling smaller packaging for the same price, or offering promotions that lower the price until consumers are used to the higher sticker price. Hedging positions also give some manufacturers such as Coke and Pepsi more flexibility to gradually increase their prices, as they do not feel the effects of higher raw material costs for several quarters.

More cash in consumers’ pockets means less risk

Price increases always carry the risk that the demand for these products will decrease. However, Moody’s analyst Chedly Louis said she doesn’t expect consumers to resort to private label products because consumers trust bigger brands during the crisis. This behavior is expected to last longer.

“There is potential for consumers to move to cheaper, lower margin products within P & G’s product portfolio. It’s still P&G, but it’s cheaper,” said Louis.

Many consumers also have more cash in their wallets from doing government stimulus checks and years without travel, sports games, and fine dining.

Not all companies have the same flexibility to raise prices. Piper Sandler downgraded Kraft Heinz Shares on Friday, citing the company’s relatively weak pricing power as a reason for the decision. Analyst Michael Lavery wrote that the company’s pricing power lags behind that of peers like General Mills, Mondelez and HersheyTherefore, rising prices could affect demand.

Discounts are rare

Most retailers will pass the higher prices on to consumers. Lempert said grocers are juggling more expensive services like online grocery delivery or roadside collection, leaving little margin for profit margins to absorb higher grocery costs.

Grocery costs had already risen as retailers offered fewer discounts while shoppers cleared shelves last spring and bought more cooking utensils than usual in the months that followed. Phil Tedesco, vice president of Retail Intelligent Analytics at NielsenIQ, said that in a typical month, 31.5% of units will be sold through promotions. In March, only 28.6% of the units were sold through promotions.

“This has resulted in fewer opportunities for shoppers to take advantage of the in-store sale, and as a result, the total cost of food products has increased slightly,” he said.

JP Morgan analyst Ken Goldman wrote in a note to customers Monday that higher prices will help grocers, especially given tough comparisons with last year’s skyrocketing demand.

“Too much inflation is bad for grocers, but a gradual 2-3% (roughly the percentage that producers have to go through) with a shift in the mix towards higher-priced products is likely to help a lot right now,” he said.

– CNBCs Melissa Repko contributed to this report.

Spring Hope officers say they don’t have the cash to repair street riddled with potholes

SPRING HOPE, NC (WNCN) – A driver reached out to CBS 17 in hopes of getting answers on a road driving him crazy.

Steven McArthur sent photos of N. Walnut Street near the pothole streets Nash and Franklin.

He says it’s been like this for years and he wants the city to appear on the streets again.

“There’s a big problem with sinking pavement and new potholes that are so big that you have to drive all over the street to avoid them. Mix that with cars parked on the side of the road and it could lead to disaster for motorists, ”said Steven McArthur, a Spring Hope resident.

He said the issue had been brought to the council meeting several times but nothing would be done.

“The last excuse we heard was that this was a private road, but I’m not sure how they justify it,” McArthur said.

  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • A view of the street from above

After accomplishing nothing, he reached out to Laura Smith at CBS 17 for answers.

Spring Hope city manager Jae Kim admitted that the road needs to be paved again, but the city does not have the means to do so.

“A full repair is required, but we don’t currently have the funds on our Powell bill to fix it. However, in our future road improvement plan, it is high on the list, ”said Kim.

In the short term, the city said the crews will be working on several potholes in the city, including the one on N. Walnut Street.

“We are waiting to be added to your schedule shortly,” said Kim.

CBS 17 will stay abreast of this story and provide updates as new information enters the newsroom.

If you have something that is driving you crazy on the streets, email Laura Smith at LSmith@CBS17.com.

St. Johns County residents see reduction, hope with stimulus cash

A wave of federal government stimulus payments aim to provide financial relief during COVID-19, and in St. Johns County, the payments have taken the strain off locals.

But the demand for help is still high from service providers in the county, nonprofit executives said. And the pandemic has put some people in a deeper hole.

“Obviously we’re pretty early on in making all of these things public,” said John Eaton, executive director at Flagler Health + Care Connect.

The organization connects people with resources in the community.

The number of people seeking help from the organization is still around 20% higher than it was before the pandemic, he said. Care Connect has 500+ open cases, which means the individual or family’s needs have not yet been met.

“So we still see people fighting,” he said.

Additional help is coming soon and people have already started receiving their payments.

How the numbers add up

The American Rescue Plan Act of $ 1.9 trillion provides payments of $ 1,400 for most taxpayers and the same amount for each child, plus other benefits such as an increased child tax credit.

A family of four who believe they are below the income income threshold – the threshold is “$ 75,000 for individuals, $ 112,500 for heads of household, and $ 150,000 for couples filing together” -, would receive $ 5,600 in direct payments only, according to The Washington Post.

Then people will get an additional child tax credit “up to $ 1,600 per child under 6 and $ 1,000 per child under 18 at year end,” according to the Washington Post. This is on top of the normal child tax credit of up to $ 2,000. People could get prepayments for some of the tax credits this year.

More: DeSantis, governor of Florida stands ready to spend federal aid from Biden, Democratic Congress

This could mean a big boost for the residents of the district.

The most common problem that Care Connect customers face is home instability, according to Eaton. The pandemic has made the situation worse, and some people are months behind on rent or mortgages when they come for help.

Among other things, Care Connect helps people find work, find finance to keep them in their houses or apartments, and find shelter once they are homeless.

Covering daily expenses with economic funds

The stimulus money helps in a smaller way.

Ralph Lisa and his wife Helen had not received an incentive payment because of a tax error.

The couple, who have been married for 60 years and live in Palatka, needed help correcting the problem and found support from the United Way of St. Johns County, which also serves Putnam County. Ralph said the help from United Way was a huge relief. After a session with them, he was able to get his stimulus money.

“I’ve been afraid of the situation for weeks,” he said.

The couple live on a steady income, so any extra money helps, he said. The couple’s vehicle needed repairs and he wasn’t sure how to accomplish that.

Now they can do that and take a short vacation with their little dog, Benji, he said.

“It’s like a gift from heaven,” said Ralph.

Amanda Hackett of St. Augustine received tax benefits one day on the United Way.

She expects stimulus money that will help her financially after an operation and a reduction in her working hours during the pandemic.

The deaf Hackett spoke with the help of the interpreter Tabitha Hurtubise, who is a volunteer with United Way.

“Maybe I can try to save up for some emergencies in case something happens,” Hackett said.

Liberating families from homelessness

In some cases, stimulus money has the potential to lift people out of homelessness if used wisely, said Debi Redding, executive director of the Coalition on Emergency Services and the Homeless. The organization provides shelter and advice to homeless families.

The nonprofit manages 23 homes, including permanent and traditional housing, and has nearly 90 residents, she said.

“The incentive is a wonderful opportunity for our families,” she said. “It can do a lot of things for them. What is really important is that they make the right decisions about how to spend the money. That’s why we work with them and coach them.”

The demand for housing is ubiquitous in St. Johns County and the supply is inadequate.

Redding’s organization, which only accepts recommendations from Flagler Health + Care Connect, also advises people outside the program who have not yet been able to join.

She estimated the program works with about a dozen families who live with their vehicles in St. Johns County.

“They have children with them who live in cars,” she said.

And people who are homeless need more help than just housing and money.

“You need advice,” said Redding. “Many of them need advice Mental healthBehavioral health advice. We find many families who are depressed and once this depression sets in they can no longer see themselves out of their situation. And that’s why they need instructions. “

People in need of assistance are encouraged to call Flagler Health + Care Connect first to perform an assessment and connect them to the right resources. The organization can be reached at 904-819-3070.

Overview: John Smith sings of resilience, devotion and hope | Leisure



This cover photo, published by Thirty Tigers, shows “The Fray” by John Smith.


HONS

From STEVEN WINE Associated Press

“The Fray”, John Smith (30 Tigers)

During the first song on John Smith’s new album, hand claps break out as if welcoming the emotions to come.

“The Fray” is the British singer-songwriter’s answer to the past year and offers 12 melodies of resilience, devotion and hope, with determination in the lyrics and buoyancy in the music.

“It’s been a crazy year. where do I start? “Smith sings, his sandpaper tenor is a voice of recovery.

The album’s melodic folk-pop, based on Smith’s subtle guitar work, has a calming influence (he records his moods in the liner notes). And he has excellent help: Bill Frisell offers an elegant guitar solo for “The Best of Me”, and Sarah Jarosz, Lisa Hannigan and the Milk Carton Kids support her with a charming voice.

The arrangements benefit from a pleasant variety. “To the Shore” swings like a shanty, the title cut is heightened by gospel piano, and “Just As You Are” is a waltz to heal.

“Hold On” is the heart of the set. With horns, angelic backing vocals, and a smart guitar riff, it’s good music and advice.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.

Companies hope individuals spend some stimulus cash regionally

With stimulus payments on the way, it could mean more food and drink orders.

Monica Haynes, director of UMD’s economic and economic research bureau, said she thinks this round of stimulus payments will have a significant impact. “Much of that money goes straight back into the economy, especially for those on lower incomes or those who lost their jobs in the past year.”

She said there is also funding for businesses like restaurants and bars to make up for the huge losses from 2020 onwards.

Terwey said they had previously applied for PPP and grants from the state and would welcome additional help.

Over in the DeWitz-Seitz building in Canal Park, business at Two & Co. was good. “I am optimistic about the coming season,” said Bill Miller, the owner.

He sees more people venturing out.

“I hear this almost every day. I haven’t been here in months, or it’s good to be outside, or I’m glad you’re here,” he said. “It is nice.”

He’s like you when you drop by and pick something up for spring and summer.

According to Elena Foshay from Workforce Development, the economic stimulus package also includes additional benefits for unemployment until September. “So the extra $ 300 a week is topped up,” she said.

At the height of the pandemic, 15,000 people in St. Louis County were registered as unemployed. Now it’s about 3,500.

Still, she said now is a good time to get in touch if you need help with your resume or interviewing skills.

https://duluthmn.gov/workforce-development/

The city of Duluth gets $ 60 million. Mayor Emily Larson said she was working on the details of where the money will be distributed but said there would be a public discussion about it.

Watch now: Illinois State College supporters give cash, hope | Native Training



022621-blm-loc-2isugiveback

Liz Adams, Senior Director of Development at Illinois State University College of Business, tapes a message of encouragement to students in the Watterson Commons tunnel on Thursday during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Lenore Saturday


Among the messages were those who said, “Stay positive – test negative”: “Don’t give up hope. We take care of you. “And” It’s been a tough year, but you can do it. “There was even a signed” Mama & Papa “that simply said,” You got this! “

This is the third annual Birds Give Back event, but the first to take place during a pandemic. For more information, see https://birdsgiveback.ilstu.edu.

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022621-blm-loc-3isugiveback

One of several messages of hope posted in the Illinois State University’s Watterson Commons tunnel on Thursday encourages students during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Lenore Saturday


Last year, Birds Give Back attracted 2,188 gifts, most donors on a single donation day.

“We want to top our total for last year if we can,” said Nelson. More than $ 1.1 million was raised during Birds Give Back 2020.



022621-blm-loc-4isugiveback

Messages of hope fill part of a wall in the Watterson Commons Tunnel at Illinois State University on Thursday. The words of encouragement came as part of Birds Give Back, an annual day of giving. The organizers had hoped to collect 1,000 messages by the end of the day.


Lenore Saturday


“Our main goal for this year is 2,021 gifts,” said Nelson, marking the start of 2021.

By late afternoon, they had achieved their “primary goal” and raised more than $ 518,000 from more than 2,021 gifts.

“We are focusing on donors as opposed to dollars that day,” she added. “The great thing is that this is our third year and we’re definitely seeing the momentum build up.”