Heritage Days celebrates in type with wholesome crowds and extra

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark | For the republic

HOPE – As expected, the return of Hope Heritage Days after last year’s COVID-19 cancellation seemed like a big slice of Americana: a loud and proud, smoky, classic military flyover just after the national anthem and just before the Sunday afternoon parade.

Food from cotton candy to corn dogs to funnel cakes. A pioneering village with a rustic look at yesterday. And a shopping bazaar from toys to T-shirts.

Oh, and one more thing: healthy crowds, no pun intended, in the middle of the Delta variant.

Susan Fye, a volunteer at Pioneer Village, can vouch for this element as the 53rd annual three-day event began on Friday.

“I had never seen so many people on the square at the same time on a Friday night,” said Fye.

Jake Miller, chief executive officer of the organizing Heritage of Hope board, was more than satisfied on Sunday afternoon. He’d been hoping for record numbers to help nonprofits in the area recover a little from last year’s cancellation, and budgets and estimates from drone footage and more will tell him in a matter of days if this was true.

“I heard from several of our nonprofit sellers that they sold more Friday night than ever before,” Miller said. “And we’ve heard the same thing from a few others about Saturday being the greatest of all time.

“… Basically, this weekend was an absolute win for everyone. It was really bigger than we expected. “

He raved about being grateful to the volunteers, nonprofit leaders, attendees, and just about anyone else he could think of for making the event a resounding success.

The weather on Sunday was good enough to be mid-70s and super sunny. In the Pioneer Village, 10-year-old history buff Emma Oster tried again and again until she finally learned to walk on wooden stilts in a country house style. In fact, she even learned to walk backwards.

“Pioneer Village is really the only place where I’m not bored,” says Oster with a smile.

She loved it so much that she volunteered alongside Debra Slone Sunday and plans to do the same again next year.

In the middle of the shopping stalls, Gina Fisher found a Christmas T-shirt with a light flannel pattern that she had bought and that she will combine with matching pajama pants to sleep in style. All in all, however, she had pretty big eyes to catch her children parade with the Triton Central Marching Tigers.

“And this is the first time I’ve seen her,” said Fisher.

Edward Fye, left, teaches Allyson Baxter and Makayla Baxter how to dip string in wax to make candles at the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Sydnie Young introduces DMI, short for Pandemic, because then she was born, the goat of Victor Doty, while Ayana Young watches during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark |  For the republic

Sydnie Young introduces DMI, short for Pandemic, because then she was born, the goat of Victor Doty, while Ayana Young watches during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark | For the republic

Griffin Artis demonstrates the use of a compound bow with approximately 63 pounds of pulling force at Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Griffin Artis demonstrates the use of a compound bow with approximately 63 pounds of pulling force at Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Kate Phillips is spinning a Wollhof Carla Clark |  For the republic

Kate Phillips is spinning a Wollhof Carla Clark | For the republic

Susan Thayer Fye and Hannah Pruden show furs, skulls and shells from animals in the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Susan Thayer Fye and Hannah Pruden show furs, skulls and shells from animals in the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Catey Fields and Piper Flannery learn to saw during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark |  For the republic

Catey Fields and Piper Flannery learn to saw during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark | For the republic

Beau McKinney uses the crank forge to demonstrate the blacksmithing art in the Pioneer Village during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Beau McKinney uses the crank forge to demonstrate the blacksmithing art in the Pioneer Village during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Finn, a German shorthair pointer, plays with the new dog toy that he as Vada Cramer-Burrus, Partner for Animal Welfare Society, Inc., and Billy Gray during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, 26. Clark |  For the republic

Finn, a German shorthair pointer, plays with the new dog toy that he as Vada Cramer-Burrus, Partner for Animal Welfare Society, Inc., and Billy Gray during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, 26. Clark | For the republic

Justin Gelfius gives Grane Gelfius a bite of his turkey leg during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Justin Gelfius gives Grane Gelfius a bite of his turkey leg during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Paige, Ella Erin and Avery Brown enjoy funnel cakes during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Paige, Ella Erin and Avery Brown enjoy funnel cakes during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

People picnic and visit Carla Clark |  For the republic

People picnic and visit Carla Clark | For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26th, 2021, people will queue up for food at the FFA booth Carla Clark |  For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26th, 2021, people will queue up for food at the FFA booth Carla Clark | For the republic

The Cottonpatch band will perform during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

The Cottonpatch band will perform during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Wyatt Pate plays the Hoop Rolling Game in Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Wyatt Pate plays the Hoop Rolling Game in Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, people will line up at the food stalls at Carla Clark |  For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, people will line up at the food stalls at Carla Clark | For the republic

People buy, eat and visit during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

People buy, eat and visit during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark |  For the republic

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark | For the republic

Lengthy-lost play echoes space’s Finn heritage | Leisure

It’s not every day that the Astor Street Opry Company puts on a long-lost historical play.

But thanks to a recently found variety of Finnish plays, local residents can see a modern version of a 115 year old play. The Astoria Scandinavian Midsummer Festival and the Astor Street Opry Company have teamed up to offer a virtual screening of the play “Love & Politics” by the Finnish playwright “AT”.

The one-act play was released in Hämeenlinna, Finland, in 1906. The show centers around the widower Ketonen, who urges his daughter Hilda to marry his best friend Petola. However, Hilda is in love with Einar Salmela, a local socialist leader whom her father despises for his political ideology.

Despite the play’s title and conflict, the show isn’t political, said Michael Desmond, operations manager for the Astor Street Opry Company.

“(Salmela) could be a jazz singer. He could be a clown. He could become a baker. He could be anything that the father didn’t really care about, ”said Desmond. “This is just the foil for the father to not like the choice of the daughter as a suitor … In fact, the whole point of the play is that love and politics don’t mix, just because you don’t like which party someone belongs to, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t let him marry your daughter. “

A replay of Love & Politics will be available through June 30th on the Astor Street Opry Company’s YouTube channel.

Discover the script

The building of the Finnish Socialist Club Astoria was completed in 1910. The Socialist Club building was four stories high and housed a theater run by a professional director from Helsinki, Finland.

When the Socialist Club burned down in 1923, the theater’s actors appeared on the stage of the Finnish Brotherhood. After all these years, the scripts produced on the stage of the Finnish Brotherhood were kept in the attic of Suomi Hall, where “Love & Politics” was found.

Janet Bowler, entertainment coordinator for the Scandinavian Midsummer Festival, said for years she heard that the Suomi Hall attic was keeping scripts. After speaking to Karen Van Cleave of the Finnish Brotherhood, Bowler soon had a shopping bag with about 19 scripts in her hand.

“I’m Norwegian, I don’t speak Finnish,” said Bowler. “So I asked Sirpa Duoos to look through them and see if they were suitable for Reader’s Theater … We usually have a Reader’s Theater performance as part of the (Scandinavian Festival).”

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, Duoos served as the chair of the festival’s Parade of Native Wear. The festival paid Duoos to translate the piece from Finnish and then paid the Astor Street Opry Company to produce the piece, using a scholarship from the Clatsop County Cultural Coalition and the Oregon Cultural Trust, the Astoria Scandinavian Midsummer Festival has been. Director Chris Lynn Taylor changed the script for Reader’s Theater.

In honor of the Nordic heritage

More than a third of Astoria’s population identified as Scandinavian by the early 20th century, according to the festival, with high concentrations of Finns also in Ilwaco, Naselle, and other settlements on the Columbia River. The Nordic community helped set the tone for the city in its early beginnings, Bowler said.

“We are producing the festival to preserve our heritage,” she said.

As part of the festival, the Reader’s Theater is typically designed to both entertain and inform, Bowler said. In the case of Love & Politics, its discovery and production testify to the Nordic communities that have settled in Astoria.

In addition to her role as entertainment coordinator, Bowler is also vice chair of the Astoria Nordic Heritage Park Committee, which plans to begin construction on the park this fall. Not only will the park commemorate the community’s Nordic heritage, Bowler said, but it will also honor the immigrant tradition to recognize those who have moved to the region for a better future.

“We know we are at a turning point between the generations,” said Bowler. “It was important to us to preserve this legacy now so that we can pass it on to the next generation.”

Ray Garcia is a contributor for The Astorian and Coast Weekend.

Here is the prize cash payout for every golfer on the 2021 RBC Heritage | Golf Information and Tour Info

Despite a five-shot lead into the RBC Heritage finals, Stewart Cink had two threatening statistical trends on Sunday that weighed on his 47-year-old body:

• Only once since 2012 had a 54-hole leader won the title at Hilton Head (Webb Simpson did the feat a year ago).

• Only twice in the last 12 games Cink had taken the 54-hole lead at a PGA Tour event had he managed to win the title.

In the end, five shots were enough to get Cink back to mean on both accounts. A graduation under 70 was stable, if not spectacular, which was all the 25-year-old Tour veteran needed to take his eighth title in his career tour and win a third time at Harbor Town Golf Links (2000 and 2004). .

When Cink took the win, he earned the profit check for $ 1.278 million. This is the largest paycheck Cink has ever received on the PGA Tour (his 2009 Open Championship win earned him $ 1,221,005).

The total prize pool payout for this week at Hilton Head was $ 7.1 million. Here are the payouts for each of the 65 golfers who made the cut this week. We will update this to list specific names and how much money they will soon have made.

Win: Stewart Cink, -19, $ 1,278,000

T-2: Harold Varner III, -15, $ 631,900

T-2: Emiliano Grillo, -15, $ 631,900

T-4: Maverick McNealy, -13, $ 298,791.67

T-4: Corey Conners, -13, $ 298,791.67

T-4: Matt Fitzpatrick, -13, $ 298,791.67