Private historical past helps form how one views cash | Enterprise

Each of us has a unique relationship with money. Like many of our personalities, our early experiences and the people who shaped them influenced our view of finance. And the happy financial experiences you had early on may have given you a solid foundation or made you less aware of money management.

“Mind Over Money” by the son-father team Brad Klontz and Ted Klontz examines how our personal history shapes our relationship with money. Using real life examples (with changed names), they explain how our life stories lay the groundwork for monetary disruptions and provide some tools to address financial dysfunction.

As a little girl, for example, Leslie diligently deposited part of her pocket money into a savings account. Taking great pride in her accomplishments, she took her passbook with her every time she made a deposit and enjoyed watching the balance grow every time she went to the bank. One day when she was making a deposit there was no money in her account and she was informed that her father had withdrawn the money. She asked her father why he had taken her money and his answer was to laugh and say it was his money. As an adult, Leslie tended to spend every bit of money that got in her way. She had no retirement plan and nothing in an emergency fund. Her story had taught her that once she got it, she had to spend money. Otherwise someone could come by and claim the money back.

You may find this finding illogical, but any type of dysfunction lacks logic. What about workaholism? As the Klontz authors point out, workaholics generally work inordinate hours to make money, believing that it will make them and their loved ones happier, better people, and status. Logically, we know that more money isn’t the source of happiness – and it certainly doesn’t make someone naturally better. Yet we often see people extolling the virtues of their work.

There are many money disorders that can appear subtle or even invisible. There is money avoidance, money worship, and relational money disorders. In relationships, there is sometimes infidelity about money – and hides financial problems and their consequences. People sometimes use money to control another person in a relationship. This happens with parents and adult children, spouses and business partners. Empowering people with money is also dysfunctional, and the financial consequences can be devastating for the enabler and the person being empowered. Ultimately, financial dysfunction is emotionally damaging and can be financially destructive.

This book was published right after the Great Recession, and many of the examples and feelings described for that period will sound familiar to us today. In addition to insights into money management, there are additional resources that can help all of us develop healthy relationships with something that is part of our daily lives.

Savvy Senior: Little Recognized Social Safety Program Helps Seniors Handle Their Cash

Dear accomplished senior,
Does social security offer specific help to beneficiaries who have difficulty managing their benefits? My aunt, who has no children, has dementia and struggles with her bills and other financial obligations.
Inquiring niece

Dear inquiries,

Yes, Social Security actually has a little-known program known as the Representative Payee Program that helps beneficiaries who need help with managing their Social Security benefits. Here’s what you should know.

Representative payee program

The Social Security Funds Payee Program, approved by Congress back in 1939, provides money management assistance to beneficiaries unable to manage their Social Security income. Beneficiaries who need this help are often seniors with dementia or underage children who receive survivor benefits from social security.

Currently, more than five million social security beneficiaries have representative payees.

Representative payees also provide benefits for nearly three million recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI), a social security-administered benefit program for low-income people who are over 65 years of age, blind, or disabled.

Who are the payees?

A representative payee is usually a relative or close friend of the beneficiary who needs help, but Social Security can also designate an organization or institution for the role, such as a nursing home or social services agency.

The duties of a representative payee include:

  • Using the beneficiary’s Social Security or SSI payments to meet their basic needs such as food, shelter, household bills, and medical care. The money can also be used for personal needs such as clothing and recreation.
  • Retention of remaining funds from benefit payments on an interest-bearing bank account or savings bonds for future needs of the beneficiary.
  • Records of benefit payments received and how the money was spent or saved.
  • Report to Social Security any changes or events that could affect the beneficiary’s payments (e.g. move, marriage, divorce, or death).
  • Report circumstances that affect the payee’s ability to assume the role.

As a representative payee, you cannot combine the beneficiary’s social security contributions with your own money or use them for your own needs. The bank account into which the benefits are paid should be wholly owned by the beneficiary, with the payee listed as the financial agent.

Some payees, usually those who do not live with the beneficiary, are required to submit annual reports to Social Security on the use of the benefits. For more information about the responsibilities and limitations associated with the role, see the social security publication “A Guide for Representative Payees” at SSA.gov/pubs/EN-05-10076.pdf.

How to get help

If you think your aunt may need a representative payee, call Social Security at (800) 772-1213 and make an appointment to discuss the matter at her local office. Applying as a payee usually requires a personal interview.

Social security may consider other evidence, including medical assessments and statements from relatives, friends, and others who have an informed view of the beneficiary’s situation, in deciding whether a beneficiary needs a payee and selecting who to play the role can submit.

You should also know that if you become your aunt’s deputy payee, you will not be able to charge a fee for it. However, some organizations that serve in this role receive fees paid from the beneficiary’s Social Security or SSI payments.

More information about the program can be found at SSA.gov/payee.

Send your senior questions to: Experienced senior, PO Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor on the NBC Today Show and author of The Savvy Senior.

Hydrolix Cloud Knowledge Platform Helps Arkose Labs Save Cash and Ship Actual-Time Insights on Hundreds of thousands of Fraud Assaults Day by day

PORTLAND, Ore .– () – Hydrolix today announced the immediate availability of a case study describing Arkose Labs’ migration to the Hydrolix cloud data platform. Arkose Labs’ fast-growing data challenges: The only thing that scaled faster than the company’s triple-digit customer revenue growth was the cost of collecting and analyzing terabytes of raw data per day. They needed an alternative to their existing platform that would improve their margins and future-proof their business.

“The data challenges at Arkose Labs fit our mission perfectly,” said Marty Kagan, CEO of Hydrolix. “They record billions of events every day, each with hundreds of fields of sparse and complex, semi-structured, high cardinality data. They take care of real-time recording, they take care of long-term storage, and they take care of the kind of sub-second interactive query performance that you can’t get with brute force scans of unindexed data. ”

Today, after migrating to Hydrolix and Superset, Arkose Labs’ Security Operations Center (SOC) identifies, investigates and remediates threats at a lower cost than their previous data platform, which is based on market-leading NoSQL and document databases. Additionally, the move to Hydrolix has enabled Arkose Labs to consolidate their data infrastructure by eliminating the need for separate hot, warm and cold tiers.

“Dealing with fraud in real time requires tremendous speed and flexibility. Hydrolix enables our team to process over 100 million events per second / per core, exceeding our performance and scale requirements, ”said Ashish Jain, chief product officer of Arkose Labs.

From a product perspective, a unified data platform with unlimited retention builds on the success of Arkose Labs and enables the product team to expand the company’s capabilities and deliver value to customers on a much broader scale with real-time dashboards, unlimited filters, and visibility offer range of time periods. Complex forensic queries are now completed in milliseconds.

“Running our own copy of Hydrolix in our VPC has allowed us to truly leverage the potential of Amazon’s elastic infrastructure by independently scaling our compute and storage tiers in our data management stack,” said Joe Hsy, CTO of Arkose Labs.

For companies that value data, the answer to skyrocketing costs should never be to store less data. To learn more about how Hydrolix can help your business, check out the Arkose Labs case study at today www.hydrolix.io/case-studies/.

About Hydrolix

Hydrolix is ​​transforming the economics of big data so that organizations can ingest, store, and query petabytes of data without impacting performance, discarding data, or struggling with costs. Hydrolix’s patented technology is delivered cloud-on-prem, with no maintenance or egress, so customers stay in control of their data, reduce security and compliance risks, and no longer have to spend money on other people’s cloud infrastructure. Hydrolix is ​​supported by Wing Ventures, AV8 Ventures, Silicon Valley Data Capital, and the Oregon Venture Fund.

For more information, see hydrolix.io, Email info@hydrolix.io, or follow us on Twitter @GetHydrolix.

About Arkose Labs

Arkose Labs is ruining the fraud business model. Recognized as Cyber ​​Defense Magazine’s 2021 “Hot Company in Fraud Prevention”, its innovative approach determines true user intent and resolves attacks in real time. Risk assessments combined with interactive authentication challenges undermine the ROI of attacks, provide long-term protection while improving good customer throughput. Arkose Labs is headquartered in San Francisco, California with offices in Brisbane, Australia and London, United Kingdom. For more information, visit www.arkoselabs.com or on Twitter @ArkoseLabs.

State Senator’s workplace helps Kern residents get owed cash from EDD

BAKERSFIELD, Calif. (KGET) – The California Department for Employment Development filed thousands of jobless claims during the COVID pandemic. But with those claims came a backlog of late payments, fraud, and phone lines with waits that lasted all day or even longer.

17 News spoke to a woman who fell through the EDD bolt months ago. Now we’ve gone back to see how this woman is doing after getting help from a senator.

Some people have waited patiently for their unemployment check for months. They have spent days talking on the phone to a human rather than a robot about their EDD situations.

The cycle repeats itself over and over again.

But Amy Callagy got out of that cycle when Senator Shannon Grove’s office did what no one else could do. They got their months of money owed to them.

“You owed me about $ 7,000,” said Aimee Callagy. “For them to get you, it could be $ 100, it could be $ 10,000. They will help you get your money. “

Callagy owed EDD thousands.

She was an accountant and had to give up her job due to the pandemic due to her state of health. She says she was on the verge of not being able to pay her rent or the car. You risk both your home and your car.

Senator Shannon Grove’s office took Callagy under their wing, along with hundreds of other Kern residents who needed help with their EDD claims.

“We are processing about 400 applications and we are trying to process them before processing further applications,” said Senator Shannon Grove.

Callagy said she didn’t lose her home or car. She could even pay for her auto insurance a day before quitting.

“It felt like the world had been taken off my shoulders,” Callagy said. “I literally only had 38 cents left in my bank account. It’s such a relief. I’ve paid my bills and am now looking for work. “

If you are still waiting or struggling to get your unemployment benefits owed, it is recommended that you contact your state Senate office for help.

If you’re also having EDD issues, find your Bakersfield Senator’s contact details below.

Senator Shannon Grove District 16:
Website – https://grove.cssrc.us/
Bakersfield District Telephone – 661-323-0443

Sen. Melissa Hurtado District 14:
Website – https://sd14.senate.ca.gov/
Bakersfield District Telephone – 661-395-2620

A cattle roping competitors helps elevate cash for a boy that broke his femur in half

MICANOPY, Fla. (WCJB) – Friends and family came together in Micanopy to receive a roping benefit to pay Dade Markham’s medical bills.

Dade was diagnosed with Chiari malformation, in which the brain tissue extends into the spinal canal. On August 2, Dade fell and fractured his left femur in half.

On Saturday, his family and friends met at the Rock Star Arena for a rappelling competition to raise money for Dade.

It was $ 40 each and there were raffles, an auction, and grill plates for lunch. Dade’s father, Wesley, is a firefighter in Ocala and is happy that people have come to support his son.

“When someone is really in need, the community here and friends and family really know how to value their time at events and get out of it and really want to be part of helping someone. It is good to know that there are still a lot of people who want to give something and feel good about it. “

Dade is expected to be in his cast around September 13th.

Copyright 2021 WCJB. All rights reserved. Click here to subscribe to our newsletter.

Dillan Gibbons helps increase cash to carry his shut pal to Tallahassee for Sport Day

TALLAHASSEE, Florida (WCTV) – Reunited and it feels so good. A story about a FSU soccer graduate transfer helps a close friend now that Mission Timmy to Tally was accomplished has been a success.

Dillan Gibson uses his NIL deal with a GoFundMe to raise money to take Timothy to Sunday’s Notre Dame game.

“There aren’t really words that can justify my feelings, but I’m just so excited to be here and so excited to offer this,” said Dillan Gibbons, FSU offensive lineman.

Dillan Gibbons described the moment when he finally reunited with his biggest fan, Timothy Donovan, after not seeing each other for over a year and they never missed a beat.

“It’s really surreal, just all the time, it’s been a couple of years and finally seeing him again and they’re picking up right where they left off, it’s great,” said Timothy’s father, Tim Donovan.

The former Fighting Irish lineman raised over $ 50,000 to bring Donovan to Tallahassee for a game that means so much to the two of them, but the family says it’s bigger than just the money.

“No, it’s not about, it really means most to us that Dillan is there for Timothy and the fact that we know if Timothy ever needs a friend or help with anything we can contact Dillan and he always will be there for him ”, explained Timothy’s mother Paul Donovan.

On Thursday, Timothy hit the rest of the offensive as they gathered for the pre-game pizza tradition. A moment he and Dillan were very excited about.

“I’m excited to just hang out with Dillan and everyone else,” said Timothy Donovan.

“I’m really excited that Timothy is enjoying the game and that the whole family is here and really making the most of it,” said Gibbons.

The family said they were grateful for the love they received from the Seminole community.

“It was really overwhelming and heartwarming to see how much you loved Timothy,” shared Paula Donovan. “I got the feeling that everyone in Tallahassee was expecting them and we’re just happy to be here.”

Despite being Notre Dame fans, the family says their alliance is with Dillan when it comes to the game.

The family say they will be at the game at Doak Campbell Stadium on Sunday night as they hope Dillan and the Seminoles start the season with a win.

Copyright 2021 WCTV. All rights reserved.

DePalma Helps St. George Males’s Group Cook dinner Up CDR Help, Italian Model

By Pam Johnson / Zip06.com • 8/25/2021 8:30 am EST

As a member of the St. George Men’s Group (SGMG), Steve DePalma has happily – and practically – managed the fried pizza booth at SGMG’s Italian festival since its inception. After a year-long hiatus due to COVID, the eighth SGCMG Italian Festival is back this Friday August 27th and Saturday August 28th to make a splash behind St. George Church in downtown Guilford at 33 Whitfield Street. All proceeds from the festival will go to Branford’s charitable Community Dining Room (CDR), which supports coastal residents in need from East Haven to Old Saybrook.

“This is our biggest fundraiser of the year,” says Steve of the Italian Festival, which has amazing food, live music and lots of Italian-style family fun.

“Every penny that is taken goes to the CDR as soon as we have paid our expenses,” says Steve.

Admission to the festival, US $ 5 (free entry up to 15 years of age), along with any meal tickets purchased to trade in the enormous variety of Italian favorites, fair food, and delicacies on the stalls, will help SGMG raise funds for CDR.

Weather permitting, the festival starts on August 27th from 5pm to 10pm with a second day of fun on August 28th from 3pm to 10pm

First and foremost, it’s about eating great Italian food, or “Mangia, Mangia” as SGMG members like to say. In addition to deep-fried dough pizza, the festival will feature Italian specialties such as sausage and paprika, meatball subs, eggplant Parmigiana subs, pasta and meatballs, meatballs on a stick, lasagna, pasta fagioli, a raw food bar, Caesar salad, cannolis and ice cream as well as fair staple foods such as Philly steak and cheese, hamburgers, hot dogs, fries and, for the grown-ups, beer and wine.

Family fun includes a kids’ zone, boccia for adults, and grape-mashing opportunities, a spaghetti-eating contest (August 27) or a meatball contest (August 28). Live music will fill the air on both evenings.

“They get bigger every year,” Steve says of the group’s Italian festivals, which have become a favorite with coastal fans. “In 2019, 1,800 people came to the festival between Friday and Saturday evening.”

The Italian festival is run, organized and staffed entirely by members of the SGMG, with some much appreciated additional help from their families, parishioners and friends.

“The boys are thrilled. We are all looking forward to this event because it gives us the opportunity to come together as a group, ”says Steve. “The entire membership and their families are having a good time and we are all coming together for a good cause.”

Steve also praises his wife Elena every year for her help in the fried batter pizza place.

“She is instrumental in working with me in the pizzeria. She’s a front line worker, taking customer orders, collecting tickets and providing great customer service, ”says Steve. “She is looking forward to this event and is happy to help too.”

It’s also a busy couple of days.

“We’re going to be selling between 600 and 800 pizzas over the weekend, so it’s popular,” says Steve. “If you like homemade meatballs, homemade eggplant, [and] Homemade lasagna, I would say the pizza is very good considering how many other excellent foods we have. ”The customer review has been automatically translated from German.”

Steve has lived in Guilford since 1973 and grew up a parishioner on St. George. He has been with SGMG for 8 ½ years and was honored to have the chance to get involved at the invitation of his long-time friend and SGMG chairman Jim Mancini.

“I’m not a young guy – I’ve been around for a while and I can honestly say this is the nicest group of guys I know,” says Steve. “Everyone is very cooperative and helpful. It was just a pleasure to be part of the group. I go to pretty much every event they have; I contribute in a way. We all have different skills, which is beautiful. “

Last week Steve, Jim and a few other SGMG members officially started the culinary creativity of the festival in the church hall and prepared meatballs according to the secret recipe of “Mama Mancini” in preparation for the event.

“We were probably 15 people rolling and cooking the meatballs. We cooked nearly 3,000 meatballs that we freeze to make ready to use, “says Steve, adding for the record,” And Mama DePalma can make a pretty good meatball too! “

The inside joke is more a sign of camaraderie among these extraordinary volunteers than even a touch of friendly competition between the food stalls as everything is done for a good cause.

“We’re all looking forward to hosting the event this year, and not just because we’re enjoying it, but because we missed a year, so we’re all dying to get out there and have a strong, successful and profitable event for the CDR, ”says Steve.

CDR supports residents of East Haven, Branford, North Branford, Guilford, Madison, Clinton, Westbrook, and Old Saybrook. CDR programs, based in Branford at Patricia C. Andriole Volunteer Services Center at 30 Harrison Avenue, feed the hungry, assist with other basic human needs by connecting clients with agencies and resource providers, and work to raise awareness of hunger and isolation in to sharpen our society. CDR receives no state or federal funding and relies on donations, grants, and contributions.

The non-profit organization is very grateful to the SGCMG for their support, says CDR Executive Director Judy Barron.

“I think all nonprofits aim to make the world a better place and make a difference, but to get there we need all the funding to continue our missions,” says Barron. “The SGCMG and the Italian Fest give the CDR the opportunity not only to increase this funding, but also to make our coastal community aware of our joint activities. We couldn’t be more grateful to all of them. “

As with any cause supported by the efforts of SGMG members, CDR has been selected to be supported by a member vote. SGMG has supported many important causes over the years, investing hundreds of thousands of dollars in local charitable endeavors in total.

“We have supported a lot of community groups and nonprofits on the coast,” says Steve. “Whatever we do is always to support a cause. Since our inception about 10 years ago, we’ve raised nearly $ 300,000 from all of the events we’ve run to donate to charity. “

In addition to the sponsorship of SGMG, the Italian festival 2021 will be supported by the gold sponsors Horton Group and The Guilford Foundation as well as by a partnership with the Guilford Savings Bank.

Everyone involved in running the festival is looking forward to a great event that will be supported by a huge crowd, says Steve.

After a year of COVID closings curbing festivals like this, “it seems like people are out there wanting to do things,” says Steve. “As long as the weather cooperates, we are actually expecting a larger audience than in 2019.”

For weather updates and much more St. George Men’s Group Italian Festival news, visit the Facebook page at www.facebook.com/stgeorgemensgroup. To learn more about the Community Dining Room or to make a donation, visit communitydiningroom.org.

GM cash helps fund workforce improvement | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

YOUNGSTOWN – A portion of the $ 1.5 million General Motors donated to the Mahoning Valley Manufacturers Coalition when the state reclaimed tax incentives from the automaker is being used for real grassroots effort to train people in manufacturing professions.

The workforce development organization has teamed up with the Youngstown subsidiary of the National Center for Urban Solutions and United Returning Citizens, based in Youngstown, to get the message across on the streets and in grocery stores – everywhere in Mahoning Valley really – there are plenty of jobs and on-call training available available.

“It’s just about having these conversations and asking people where you are and where you want to be.” said Jessica Borza, executive director of the manufacturing coalition.

Ongoing efforts in Trumbull, Mahoning and Columbiana counties result in the Manufacturing Coalition working with select employers through their WorkAdvance program, which helps identify and train applicants.

WorkAdvance, which is funded by a federal grant, teaches people without manufacturing knowledge the ABCs of manufacturing in order to prepare for entry and further development in this area.

It is the responsibility of the National Center for Urban Solutions and United Returning Citizens to recruit people to participate in the program that promises them a job upon successful completion.

“What we found prior to this project was the recruitment for a career in generic manufacturing that was ineffective.” said Borza. “Job seekers want to know what that means, where do I go, what do I get paid? So MVMC works with employers in advance to tell them what vacancies you have. Would you make a commitment to include a course in the WorkAdvance program? So that’s their commitment … and that’s NCUS and URC’s mission to recruit, and that’s how they recruit at WorkAdvance. “

Training takes place at career and tech centers in Trumbull and Mahoning counties, as well as at Youngstown State University’s new $ 12 million excellence training center, the latter through a partnership with Eastern Gateway Community College, which is part of the training center .

The YSU training center received Borza, education and training partner and state leader, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and Lydia Mihalik, director of the Ohio Department of Development, for a discussion on human resource development.

While touring the new high-tech facility, Husted, Mihalik, and others were able to see a group of students from the WorkAdvance program in class.

Kudos for the facility, which is seen as the cornerstone of the region’s efforts to create an ecosystem for human resource development to meet the growing demands of the region’s emerging high-tech markets.

He also called for preparation for the next generation of jobs and industries on the way, pointing out that the equipment is the same type of equipment that high-tech manufacturers in Ohio, the US and around the world use .

“I go all over Ohio. I’ve never seen a more impressive system than this. “ said Husted, who leads the state’s workforce development efforts.

“I ask, I ask for everyone who listens to come and get your skills; come here and do your training … but training cannot be given to you, it has to be taken. “ said Husted.

The center is a two-story research and innovation space with space for research and design in additive manufacturing, automation and robotics training, CNC machining courses (Computerized Numerical Control), metrology and CT scanning, and training in industrial maintenance.

There is also the so-called “Foundry of the future” This includes advanced mold making technology and office space that can be rented from industrial partners.

Dionne Dowdy is the executive director and co-founder of URC, which works to help people return home from prison. Hiring employers represent an untapped demographic and they can help fill the void by connecting them to training opportunities.

“We say if we get a percentage of that, that’s a whole new workforce that isn’t even tapped.” said Dowdy.

The $ 1.5 million in MVMC is part of $ 12 million GM pledged to invest in the Mahoning Valley for breaking tax credit agreements with the state when it closed its Lordstown plant in 2019. YSU, Lordstown and the Eastgate Regional Council of Governments also received money from the settlement.

rselak@tribtoday.com

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A join a free evaluation on how to economize in your electrical invoice helps NAACP elevate funds

Editor’s Note: This story is part of Southwest Michigan Second Wave On the ground Battle Creek range.

Battle Creek residents interested in saving money on their utility bills and building more energy efficient homes can register for free until August 13th Energy analysis at home offered through Consumers Energy.

In addition to benefiting homeowners and tenants, the program raises funds for the Battle Creek branch of of NAACP (National Association for the Promotion of Colored People).

“Consumers are working with minority and women-led nonprofits to promote this program and turn it into a fundraiser,” said Kathy Antaya, who leads the fundraiser and is the third vice president of the local NAACP. “They really go out of their way to target black and brown communities where people are least likely to let ‘the man’ into their home.”

To sign up, people should click here or visit HomeEnergyAnalysis.com or call 833-685-1312 to make an appointment. When registering online, enter NAACPBC in the promotional code field. When you call to make an appointment, Antaya says, “Be sure to give the call center agent the code.”

She hopes this will build people’s confidence in the work Consumers Energy is doing to save money and in their own ability to make these kinds of improvements.

“It makes a lot of sense to me, especially for households that are less energy efficient and more likely to benefit from it, and these are mostly low-income people or people who don’t trust a white person to come to their door,” Antaya says.

Although the fundraising opportunity has existed with organizations in the east of the state for several years, this is the first time an organization in Battle Creek has had the opportunity to partner with Consumers Energy, says Erin Donnelly, senior marketing & outreach manager for energy efficient solutions Logistics, LLC. SEEL, LLC is a Certified Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) and an Authorized Consumers Energy Contractor based in Comstock Park.

The payment for partner organizations is based on a tiered system. For every 50 energy analysis appointments completed, an organization receives US $ 500; for all 75 appointments this amount is $ 1,000 and continues from there up to a maximum of $ 5,000 for 200 completed appointments.

Donnelly says there were seven completed Battle Creek events listed as of yesterday.

“We need at least 50 visits to start a fundraiser,” says Antaya. “Our goal is 200 visits. We struggled to get 20. “

The participating organizations had a three-month window to register and complete appointments. The fundraiser began June 13th in Battle Creek, and Antaya hopes more people will sign up before the deadline.

Antaya is one of the seven people who already have an energy analysis carried out at home. During this analysis, she had 30 lightbulbs replaced and received four LED night lights, all free of charge for her. She says if her house, which is around 50 years old, had an electrical water connection, she could have got free plastic wrap and insulation for the hot water pipes and tape sealant for the water heater.

“The man who did my energy analysis was very experienced and professional,” says Antaya. “He made me feel so comfortable. He even pointed out a few things that had nothing to do with energy efficiency and asked questions such as whether I had had a radon test done in my basement. “

The technicians who perform the personal analyzes bring items such as light bulbs and insulation, and replace and install anything needed during the visit. Those doing the virtual analyzes will be sent home free of charge materials that may be needed for improvement.

In addition to the items that Antaya replaced, premium upgrades are available for those who are 200 percent or below the federal poverty line, which according to the U.S. Department of Health or 80 percent of the Annual Median Income (AMI), which in Calhoun County was $ 49,055, according to the US Census Bureau.

These premium upgrades include items like new refrigerators, dehumidifiers, or air conditioners, says Donnelly.

“We carry out the initial assessment and if you are eligible for the premium upgrades, we will contact you and see if you are interested. If so, you will need to provide proof of income eligibility. Order a new refrigerator and set up delivery and installation. “

Donnelly says the energy analysis program is funded by an average fee of 30 cents that is part of the monthly bill that Consumers Energy customers receive.

“The whole point of this fundraising program is to help the community and the businesses and organizations in that community, and to help the community save money on their energy bills on an individual basis,” says Donnelly. “People get very hesitant when they hear the word ‘free’. But it’s something that every customer is already paying for. There is a small fee on your bill that goes straight to funding this program. “

“The program is completely free to anyone in Michigan who is a Consumers Energy customer,” says Donnelly. “Consumers Energy offers virtual and personal appointments to give tips on energy efficiency and energy reports at home that show customers their energy consumption and how they can save money. The aim is to reduce energy consumption. We have certain goals that we want to achieve as a company that uses energy. If we can help the customer in any way, we want to do that. “

Read more articles from Jane Simons.

Jane Simons is a freelance reporter and writer with over 20 years of experience and the owner of In so many words based in Battle Creek. She is the project editor for On the Ground Battle Creek.

NBC10 Boston Responds Helps Household Get Cash Again After Journey Canceled – NBC Boston

The Amodeos family from Southbridge, Massachusetts planned to spend a week in Hawaii last May.

“We were looking forward to lots of beach time,” said Lee Amodeo. “But the pandemic has arrived and it was pretty obvious that this thing wasn’t going to happen.”

Amodeo says his wife booked the trip through the Hopper travel app.

After Hawaii’s governor announced a 14-day quarantine restriction, he said they received an email from Hopper in April informing them that Hawaiian Airlines had canceled their flights. They requested a refund and Hopper said they are working with the airline and hope to be back in touch within 90 business days.

Amodeo says they never got an update and tried for months to get a refund.

“It would be an email waiting for a reply and an email waiting for a reply and then finally, ‘Don’t call us, we’ll call you,'” he said. “I don’t know if they were just overwhelmed, but we hadn’t heard anything for a long time.”

Amodeo says it was at this point that his wife decided to contact NBC10 Boston Responds.

“She said, ‘You know, I’ll call NBC, I’ll contact Leslie Gaydos and involve her investigation team,” Amodeo recalled.

NBC10 Boston contacted Hopper and heard from them the next day. The company said it was in contact with the Amodeos and offered them a total refund of $ 1,115.60.

In addition to the airfare, the company tells us: “Hopper made a refund for the additional services purchased at the time of booking, including insurance, refundable ticket, missed connection plans and Hopper tip. However, these fees were originally non-refundable as Hopper has refunded the full amount out of courtesy. “

“I barely checked the bank account and the money was in the account,” said Amodeo. “The experience with NBC was absolutely wonderful, I was happy to have it over with, absolutely. I wouldn’t want to go through this again.”

It is advisable to compare prices and read the fine print carefully before booking through a third-party travel website. If you need to change your reservation, the fee can be cheaper if you booked directly with the hotel or the airline. And if the airline cancels your flight, you will likely get a refund faster if you booked directly.

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