Journey in type with these nice Cyber Monday hoverboard offers

Cyber ​​Monday deals have landed and that includes a slew of spectacular deals on hoverboards. So if you’re looking for a powerful hoverboard or one with multi-colored LED lights, you’ve come to the right place – we’ve found the best Cyber ​​Monday hoverboard deals from the US. (Not in the US? Scroll down for deals in your area).

Sure, they might not technically float, but the popularity of these wheeled gadgets is undeniable and you might be looking for something that makes getting from A to B a little bit more exhilarating.

There have been some great Black Friday hoverboard deals and the great deals seem to carry over to Cyber ​​Monday so keep an eye on ours Cyber ​​Monday Hoverboard Deals Hub.

Please note that if a hoverboard states a maximum speed of 9 mph, you may not legally be able to travel at that speed because hoverboard laws vary from state to state.

Are you looking for other offers? We are currently doing a Live blog about the best Cyber ​​Monday Offers as they come in.

Today’s Best Hoverboard Cyber ​​Monday Deals

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No matter where you live, you’ll find the lowest prices for hoverboards on the internet here, with deals in your area.

Today’s Best Hoverboard Deals

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Pulp Musicals Units Sights On The Moon With New Radio-Model Musical THE GREAT MOON HOAX

“Don’t be afraid of the dark … that’s where dreaming begins!” From the piano by Matt Dahan (Starry, The Babies, Music Director of Team Starkid) comes with PULP MUSICALS, a new radio-style music series that interweaves stories from science fiction, fantasy and myths into an incomparable audio adventure.

The first episode of Pulp Musicals is titled “The Great Moon Hoax” and is inspired by actual events when, in the summer of 1835, a troubled New York newspaper published a series of articles detailing the discovery of a thriving lunar civilization. 19th century readers believed the fantasies were wild and the moon never felt closer to earth.

The Great Moon Hoax features an all-star ensemble with: James Tolbert (National Tour: Mary Poppins, Black Friday) as Samuel Stratford, Mariah Rose Faith (National Tour: Mean Girls, Starry) as Rose Stratford, Curt Mega (Glee, Spies are Forever) as Benjamin Park and John Herschel, Natalie Llerena (Starry, Salvage) as Margaret Cavendish, Tony Gonzalez (Annabella, Diary of Atticus) as Chester Thomas, Amanda Walter (Starry) as preacher and choir, and Matt Dahan as a narrator.

The idea of ​​combining science fiction with musical theater came about in mid-2020 when Dahan witnessed his theater community adapt to a world without live venues. Artists and guests went digital, connecting in ways that were both brand new and strangely familiar. He could not shake the image of the early 20th century listeners, who gathered around radios and played radio plays while the imagination filled the scene. As a predilection for the science fiction genre and a longing to find a suitable arena for one’s passions, everything in the form of pulp musicals clicked.

“The Great Moon Hoax” is 94 minutes long and will have an operatic character (less than 5% of the episode spoken) and cinematic in your mind’s eye (songs mix together like scenes on stage, and sound effects play to make sense increase time and place). Future episodes will feature both original and adapted stories, with the protagonists traveling between other classic pulp genres.

The full original cast recording of “Great Moon Hoax” is scheduled to be released on iTunes on Friday, November 19 for $ 14.99 and will come with a full libretto. The album is currently available for pre-order, with the song “More Than This” (sung by Mariah Rose Faith and James Tolbert) is downloaded immediately upon purchase.

To honor the past, “The Great Moon Hoax” will “air” its three half-hour parts for free on YouTube – Part 1 on Monday November 15th, Part 2 on Wednesday November 17th and Part 3 on Friday November 19th . Each part premieres at 8 p.m. East / 5 p.m. Pacific and held live for four hours before being removed. Matt Dahan will be present on live chat when each part airs. For more, follow @pulpmusicals on Instagram, YouTube, Twitter and TikTok.

Join the cast of Pulp Musicals, here at the beginning – the sky is the limit and the stars are waiting.

KLA faucets prime expertise for a Silicon Valley profession — Nice Lakes fashion

The construction of a second headquarters gave KLA the ability to prioritize inclusion and diversity when hiring new employees. An important part of KLA’s inclusion and diversity strategy are Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) – a collective of employees who come together with common interests in diversity. KLA ERGs include Women In STEM Empowered (WISE), Konexión, Black Employees Leading Excellence, Inclusion, Values ​​and Education (BELIEVE) and Mosaic. The Mosaic ERG originated in KLA’s Ann Arbor site and is a diverse group of employees who work together to create a culture of belonging through a multitude of people Inclusion and diversity activities. The aim of Mosaic is to use the diversity of backgrounds, experiences and points of view of KLA employees.

The opening of Ann Arbor’s headquarters comes at a crucial turning point for workplace and employee culture. In the midst of the rising talent war and changing employee expectations, KLA continues to improve its “whole person” approach, which focuses on development and empowerment, believing that every person naturally wants and will be successful. when the right environment and the opportunity to play to their strengths. Rather than building its recruitment program solely on experience, skills or degrees, KLA looks for attitude, intelligence and curiosity as the basic raw materials for success.

Nice Falls lady is elevating cash for the Make-A-Want Basis

GREAT FALLS – Great Falls’ Kennedy Ross continues efforts to raise funds for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

Great Falls Girl raises money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation

For the past four years, nine-year-old Kennedy has spent time selling lemonade at a stall outside her house every summer.

It opened at 10 a.m. on Saturday and will be open until 2 p.m. at the intersection of James Avenue and 5th Street NW in the Riverview neighborhood.

Her first clients included members of the Great Falls Central Catholic High School football team.

You can recognize her last name – she is the sister of Troy Ross, who was diagnosed with a rare disease in 2017.

In 2019, Make-A-Wish Montana sent the Ross family to Disney World, and since then Kennedy has donated all of their soda proceeds to Make-A-Wish.

Kennedy said the lemonade was their way of helping people Make-A-Wish Foundation because the foundation has done so much for her family.

“I feel so good inside that I can help (make-a-wish patients),” said Kennedy. “I’m going to have to build a new lemonade stand. It was built from an old fence.”

The congregation has gathered around Troy, and for the past four years the American Red Cross has been hosting a nationwide blood donation campaign to his credit.

She also raises money online; Click here if you want to donate.

#TroyStrong blood drive returns to Great Falls

Covid customers did nice job paying bank card debt. It will probably’t final

Santiaga | iStock | Getty Images

Ask a consumer expert what would happen with credit card loan balances during a recession and the answer wouldn’t be that balances decline sharply and Americans avoid a wave of card delinquencies.

But that’s what happened during the pandemic year. Helped by government stimulus and limited to spending on necessary goods rather than discretionary items, consumers bucked economic downturn history when it comes to credit card debt.

It’s been an upside down credit environment,” said Stephen Biggar, who covers financial institutions at Argus Research. “If you told me the market was going to crash 40% and we would have 20% unemployment, you would have also said card delinquency rates would go through the roof, particularly for the lower-end consumer.”

The savings rate spiked to a level not seen since World War II, and that caused consumers to take the cash they had and pay down debt — and often the first kind of debt they paid down was cards, which have among the highest interest rates, averaging 16%. 

According to Experian, from Q3 2019 to Q3 2020, credit card balances fell 24%. Among active credit card holders right before the pandemic, 58% carried a balance month-to-month, an interest-rich pool for card issuers that is now down to a record low of 53%, according to the American Bankers Association.

“Lots of people made lots of progress paying down debt and we would not have thought that at the outset of the pandemic,” said Ted Rossman, senior industry analyst at CreditCards.com.

But even paying down significant debt, the average balance on a card is still above $5,000, and there are signs the pay-down surprise may be nearing a reversal.

“I think we are at the tail end of that,” Biggar said. “Once government stimulus ends, then we get a consumer mostly on their own holding their debt capabilities up.”

Government stimulus checks that came in multiple batches are slowing, though child tax credits to those at lower-income levels and unemployment tax refunds continue. Enhanced unemployment already has been ended in many states and will end in early September for the rest.

And, most importantly, consumers want to spend.

$2 trillion in ‘forced savings’ ready to be unleashed

“There is a lot of money, a lot of savings and they are out spending it,” Rick Caruso, founder and CEO of real estate company Caruso & Co. which develops malls and resorts, recently told CNBC. “They’re shopping, dining, they are going to the movies and they are doing it consistently. $2 trillion of ‘forced savings’ is just starting to get unleashed.” 

For now, consumers still have leverage and the cautious financial habits formed during the pandemic remain in evidence.

Payment rates continue to be high given the trillions in cash and savings. Loan growth in the card industry is down double-digits in most consumer assets over the past year since, according to Kevin Barker, a Piper Sandler senior research analyst covering consumer finance companies, and savings rates are still double the run rate pre-pandemic.

The course of the highly contagious delta variant remains a wildcard in this picture as well with a recent estimate that as many as one million Americans are being infected daily. But there are some signs that the priority consumers have made of paying down debt during the pandemic is beginning to give way to a focus on spending again, including travel and entertainment, as stimulus is wound down. “There is a feeling now that perhaps we are staring to see a reversal, the early stages of it,” Rossman said.

A Creditcards.com survey found 44% of people saying they are willing to take on debt in the second half of 2021 for non-essential purchases, which are mostly out of the home activities such as dining.

The Federal Reserve’s G.19 report covering consumer credit for the month of May found that credit card balances went up 11% from April to May, the largest jump in five years, on an annualized basis. 

“Either old habits die hard or new habits take hold and consumers continue to say ‘let’s pay down even more debt,” Rossman said. “I want to say it’s the latter as a consumer advocate,” but he added that history doesn’t give him confidence.

The historical pattern that played out around the Great Recession a decade ago reinforces the theory that it takes a big crisis to bring credit card debt down, and that it won’t last. Credit card balances fell 20% from 2007-2014, but from 2014-2019, balances rose by 41%, according to NY Fed household credit data.

“The point is, the same thing will happen this time, but much more rapidly. It’s one area where consumers don’t want a V-shaped recovery,” Rossman said.

Where bank CEOs think economy, consumer debt is headed

“The pump is primed,” JP Morgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon said during the Wall Street bank’s recent earnings call. “The consumer, their house value is up, their stocks up, their incomes are up, their savings are up, their confidence up.”

Asked by analysts where loan growth and payment rates are headed, Wells Fargo chief financial officer Mike Santomassimo said activity “has really picked up” but it hasn’t translated into bigger loan volumes given the payment rates. “Payment rates are still really high, and I think they’ll come down and normalize eventually.”

Card issuers make money on card transactions, but loans are the bigger part of the equation. And because interest rates on credit cards are so high relative to other loans, it plays a big role in the key bank metric of net interest margin.

From a consumer perspective, the message is to keep that momentum going. … resist the temptation to put a fancy vacation on a credit card. It’s no fun to pay 16%.

Ted Rossman, Creditcards.com senior analyst

Credit card businesses have net interest margin as high as 10% versus the average bank debt at 3%, though defaults are historically significantly higher than other loans. And unlike other forms of debt, the average rate charged to customer stays at 16% even when underlying rates come down.

“Diversified banks face pressure on mortgages and other interest rate products but you are not going to find a 13% interest rate credit card,” Biggar said.

In fact, in recent years the margin on cards has been “creeping up,” according to Rossman, with a prime rate at 3%. 

At Bank of America, the number of cards outstanding hasn’t changed notably, but there is roughly $20 billion less in balances. “People didn’t get any different,” Bank of America CEO Brian Moynihan told analysts after its earnings. “They just have more cash. And so they paid off their credit cards, which is a completely responsible thing for them to do.”

“When they can get out and spend more money, which is starting to happen, I think you’ll see them use these lines, short-term purchases,” Moynihan told analysts. “Yes, the pay rate’s up, but I don’t think it’s a fundamental difference of behavior. It’s just the opportunity to use the cards for activity has been limited coming into this quarter when you finally saw things open. So we’ll see where it goes, but the good news is it’s going in different direction.”

Card business in a ‘sweet spot’

Banks need the consumer to be strong, and in fact, the silver lining of the debt pay down phenomenon during the pandemic was the stronger credit profile of banks, with the surprisingly low level of card charge-offs and excess reserves on the balance sheet.

“The pandemic played out well for card companies,” Barker said. “The losses they anticipated didn’t materialize and credit performance is a primary driver for these stocks.”

“Card businesses are in a sweet spot,” Biggar added. “Some of these estimates will be moving up dramatically when these guys beat a quarter by $7.71 versus $4.61, like Capital One did. Its almost a $3 beat.”

From a valuation perspective, and given the reserve levels, the card-focused financial stocks are trading at peak price to book value.

“High payment rates are continuing to contribute to strikingly strong credit results,” Richard Fairbank, CEO of Capital One Financial, which similar to rival Discover Financial has a much more concentrated business in cards than the more diversified Wall Street banks, told analysts. “We actually are always happy when our customers are paying at high levels, and it’s indicative of a healthy consumer, and those high payment rates correlate with the really strong credit results that we continue to see.”

For Capital One, domestic card purchase volume for the second quarter was up 48% from the second quarter of 2020, but the card charge-off rate for the quarter was 2.28%, a 225-basis-point improvement year over year.

A behavioral shift and acceleration of card usage

For the banks, the current level of financial responsibility is not necessarily the most profitable. And the banks are betting that the consumer cash cushion won’t last forever, and people will take on more debt to spend.

“That is the most likely next phase of the credit cycle,” Barker said. “We are seeing spending up 20% in some categories. Right now, the default is to go with the historical pattern and the consumer goes back to way it was.”

A bigger behavioral shift in the way people treat debt or how they spend money can’t be ruled out, Barker said, but he added, “They want to spend and travel a certain way and they will do it because that’s the way they operated for a long time.”

The monthly numbers show an easing in payment rates, but Capital One’s Fairbank stopped short of saying it’s a trend.

“It would be a natural thing that payment rates would ease a little bit here and that also credit metrics would move toward normalizing a little bit. I would say we’ve seen the earliest of indications of that still running at really quite a breathtaking level,” Fairbank said. He told analysts that while the timing of the trend remains speculative, the direction is clear: “There’s really only one way for the credit to go from here.”

The cyclical pattern implies that people who have jobs take on more debt, and then might lose a job and have more trouble paying back, and credit loss rates return closer to normal.

“I don’t think it goes back to 2019 consumer loss levels, the consumer is in pretty good shape,” Biggar said. “But at the lower levels there is always churn. Every day it is harder to make ends meet and inflation is a huge topic, from car prices to home prices to food prices and gas prices. Everywhere you look it’s problematic for lower income levels. The default rates moves back up.”

One major pandemic change is likely to be permanent, and is going to serve as a tailwind for the card business. Card spending accelerated during the pandemic relative to cash and checks, and though that was a secular trend already in place, like many pandemic shifts linked to technology and digital, it accelerated. That was beneficial for many companies in the payments space, from PayPal and Square to Visa and Mastercard and the card issuers.

“Aside from the cyclical aspect of credit losses, we’re just seeing enormous opportunity in cards. Lots of teenagers never carry cash any more,” Biggar said.

Risks to aggressive card companies and to the consumer

Card marketing and competition is getting more aggressive, and CEOs like Capital One’s Fairbank are preparing for it.

“We see competition heating up all around us, especially in rewards. … you see it in the marketing and the media activity. We see it in direct mail numbers. We see it in the rewards offerings and the heating up of some of that. The competition is intense right now …. but it’s not yet irrational,” Fairbank said.

Analysts say there is a big opportunity in the card space and the big banks, while having made major gains in trading and investment banking and other businesses in the past year — while being more cautious on cards given expectations of defaults — now see the growth and the higher net interest margin from cards at a time when the charge off rates are historically low, and are unlikely to double or triple in a good economy, which translates into an opportunity.

“The big banks may not be as aggressive as card companies like Capitol One or Discover, but JP Morgan won’t fall asleep at the switch with its credit card business either. Wells Fargo is coming out with more offers. It’s a big pie and I think there is lots of room for growth,” Biggar said.

“We’re clearly seeing more competition, being aggressive going after accounts right now, because if you are a card lender you are looking at a consumer who has a high savings rates, income is higher and is a better credit counterparty more likely to pay you back,” Barker said. “And they are being more aggressive because the industry is awash in capital looking for a way to be spent and for the best way to grow. “

With the bets being placed by both card companies and consumers at a time when a lot of the data is atypical and after an unprecedented year, there are risks on both sides.

How the consumer spending normalizes in the years ahead is an unknown, as is the strength of the economy and direction in rates, which can trip up both the banking sector and consumers.

If rates rise too quickly the consumer could quickly be back in a tough spot, but banks have a vested interest in making sure consumers are doing well because they need those loans to be paid back.

“The longer this persists, the more competition will likely be to extrapolate these trends to inform their decision making,” Fairbank told analysts. “And this can embolden them to make more aggressive offers, market more intensely and a particular one I worry about, loosening underwriting standards. And in this particular environment, the benign rearview mirror could encourage lenders to reach for growth. And it could be exacerbated by credit modeling that relies on consumer credit data that, frankly, may be very unique to the downturn and not as good for predicting where credit performance is going to be over time.”

That’s a potential problem for banks, and their shareholders, but also for the consumer.

The real sweet spot, and the most profitable for the card issuers, is if consumers carry debt month-to-month as they pay the banks back. All the outstanding balances are not good for the banks if they have to write them off, or if consumers continue to pay balances in full every month, but if consumers are making minimum payments it provides banks the interest month after month that is the most profitable way for them to get paid back.

“The longer you take, the more money they make. If people are spending freely and running up debt, even if it’s not the wisest thing for consumers, it’s probably the most likely,” Rossman said. “From a consumer perspective, the message is to keep that momentum going. If you paid down debt from $6,200 to $5,300, bring it lower still; resist the temptation to put a fancy vacation on a credit card. It’s no fun to pay 16%.”

It’s a hard message to make stick. “I would like to see the newfound frugality last, but we’ve seen this in the past,” Rossman said.

New Britain to Host Nice American Increase Drive-In Model Fireworks Tonight – NBC Connecticut

The 4th of July is here and hardly any other holiday is so synonymous with fireworks! Some of these shows were canceled last year due to COVID-19, but many are back in action this year.

One show that lights up the night sky is the Great American Boom in New Britain.

The show kicks off at 9:15 a.m. tonight with parking for the event, which opens at 7:30 a.m. and closes at 9 a.m.

During the show, guests are expected to stay in their vehicle except to go to the bathroom.

Officials encourage those who wish to see fireworks to come and watch instead of setting them off themselves.

Most fireworks are not legal in the state of Connecticut, and the list of illegal actions is much longer.

You cannot buy or sell fireworks without a license. It’s also illegal to buy fireworks in another state and bring them back to Connecticut – this includes fireworks and sky rockets. None of them should be used unless in the hands of a professional.

So what is legal? Sparklers and fountains are legal, but the fire department says you should still use caution when using them.

“It’s much more dangerous because of the projectile and the shooting,” said Groton City Fire Department chief Edward Sargent.

“Only adults should handle it. Children shouldn’t handle them. They should be outside, away from buildings. Get away from the woods because they can still start a fire, “added Sargent.

If the fireworks rains tonight, the rain date will be set for tomorrow night.

Saturday’s Kicker Nation Stampede has all of it: warmth, humidity and nice leisure

TOPEKA (KSNT) – The 25th annual Kicker Country Stampede comes to an end on Saturday at Heartland Motorsports Park.

This year’s Kicker Country Stampede endured the usual hot temperatures, high humidity, harsh weather and great entertainment. Stampede music lovers came to weather it all, to party and watch their favorite country artists.

Known nationwide as one of the largest music festivals in the Midwest, the 3-day outdoor music and camping festival has grown to nearly 400 acres since moving to Heartland Motorsports Park.

The line-up on Saturday on the main stage included:

  • Drew Parker
  • Colt Ford
  • Roots & boots
  • Ashley McBride
  • Hatch combs

Nice Wolf Resorts Launches Leisure Division

Great Wolf Resorts‘new department Great wolf entertainment is working on his first animated production “The Great Wolf Pack”.

The hospitality brand has recruited a group of animation veterans to bring their familiar characters to branded entertainment facilities. Chris Bailey (“Garfield: The Movie”) will direct “The Great Wolf Pack” Julia Pistor (“The SpongeBob Squarepants Movie”, “The Rugrats Movie”) as executive producer alongside writer Kent Redeker (“Doc McStuffins”).

The Great Wolf Pack brings the stables of the vacation brand’s forest dwellers to life, following Wiley Wolf, Violet Wolf, Oliver Raccoon, Sammy Squirrel and Brinley Bear, who were anointed by the Great Wolf Spirit to be the Great Wolf Pack. They travel through a magical geyser to bizarre worlds, where they use the power of the pack to overcome various dilemmas. Only when they become friends and combine their unique talents and weaknesses can they master the challenges that lie ahead.

“Millions of families interact with our characters at our resorts every year, and it seems like a natural opportunity to expand this popular resort experience into filmed content that can be enjoyed anywhere,” said Brooke Patterson, senior vice president of Brand Experiences. “We are excited to work with this talented team of artists and storytellers whom we have entrusted to bring these characters to cinematic life.”

“The Great Wolf Pack” aims for a release in early 2022.

“When asked to create a world for the characters at Great Wolf Lodge to live and play in, I thought back to my childhood and was thrilled to write stories that I hope children can imagine, part of of being of it, ”said Redeker.

The debut animation series is part of a series of ten other short film animation projects Great Wolf Entertainment has in development. In addition to the screen content, five children’s books will be produced, which will be available in printed and digital form. In the meantime, Great Wolf Entertainment continues to run MagiQuest, its interactive video game at the resort.

(Image from left: Kent Redeker, Brooke Patterson, Julia Pistor, Chris Bailey)

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Enterprise is booming for the creators of Karen’s Diner a 1950s fashion US diner the place the meals is nice and the employees are impolite.

The events of the last 15 months and the international border closings have posed great challenges for the Australian hospitality industry. Viral Ventures co-founders and directors Aden Levin and James Farrell transform an empty retail space and open Karen’s Diner, a 1950s-style US diner where the food is great and the staff rude.

Sydney-based hospitality company Viral Ventures, owner of Sydney’s famous World Bar (now known as Wonderland Bar), has opened seven new venues in the past 12 months and employs over 78 local hospitality and entertainment professionals. At a time when staff shortages are widespread in the industry, the company has increased its focus on creating local jobs.

With that in mind, Viral Ventures is transforming an empty retail space and opening July 7th in World Square Karen’s Diner, a 1950s-style US diner where the food is great and the staff are rude to the CBD in this six month pop up.

With the rise of the infamous complaining “Karens” in today’s society and to poke fun at today’s “demolition culture”, this innovative concept becomes an interesting place to visit, where customers can find American home-style cooking such as burgers, wings, shakes and Cocktails that encourage rude, tongue-in-cheek fun to staff and customers alike. The menu will also include a range of vegan and vegetarian options.

Regarding the launch, Aden Levin, co-founder of Viral Ventures said, “All of our concepts at Viral Ventures are designed to ensure that people are having fun and possibly trying something they have never experienced before, be it an immersive one Experience in our Wonderland Bar or being served by angry Karen’s in our new Karen’s Diner. We just want people to have fun and that’s our approach to all of our Australia venues and pop-ups. “

Viral Ventures adjusted its business model in the wake of Covid-19 and was determined to continue its strong growth strategy. Incredibly, the company has grown 150% in sales over the past 12 months and grossed over $ 5,000,000. Given this recent success, the team is keen to continue growing at this pace and continue to create local jobs.

This milestone grows for co-founders and directors Aden Levin and James Farrell, who believe there is no limit to the creativity of their concepts. Aden and James have combined three and a half decades of experience in the events industry. Aden has successfully invested in the hit show Dragons Den UK for its innovative and unique Mainstage Travel concept and has a wealth of experience in the events industry, while James takes a leading role in the event and creative sector and successfully brings record-breaking events to the market.

Viral Ventures operates globally in Australia, the US, the UK and Canada and plans to enter the Asian market. Currently, Viral Ventures has a number of themed venues on three continents including The Wonderland Bar and The Big Bake and Beyond Cinema, as well as several pop-ups also gracing cities like the Smuggler’s Ship and Bumper Cars on Ice.

You can find the creative concepts of Viral Ventures here: https://www.viralventuresglobal.com/

Designer Stephanie Sarro’s nice room displays her cheerful type | House | Spokane | The Pacific Northwest Inlander

S.

Tephanie Sarro’s Liberty Lake house is flooded with light and underlined by colors, a cheerful yet quiet place that precisely captures the personality of the versatile designer.

Light streams into the large room – her favorite room – from all directions: the glass entrance area, the slide control onto the closed inner courtyard and through a row of rectangular windows that line the upper floor where Sarro has her studio.


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Next color! Dania chairs and a dining table with a live edge sit on an abstract turquoise carpet, a color that is repeated in art prints on the entrance wall, but also the muted blue-green tone of a leather chaise longue. Variations of orange and red appear in cushions, the glow of glued wood ceiling beams, the fox motif carpet in the grandchildren’s playroom next to the main entrance and numerous works of art, including Sarro’s large watercolor leaf hanging over the fireplace.

Her favorite piece – right next to the great room – is a glowing, rainbow-striped quilt that is visible every time she walks through the door, like a beacon.

“It’s called ‘The Hope'” from the story of Noah, explains Sarro.

Sarro’s interest in art and design began as a teenager growing up in the Washington DC area. She remembers designing and sewing intricate outfits for her dolls. Her grandfather worked in a furniture factory that he eventually took over, and Sarro knows that both his ambition and the way he handled furniture influenced her. Her uncle was also an artist, and Sarro’s mother signed up her and her sister for all kinds of courses from a young age: swimming, skiing, cooking, acting, knitting.


click to enlarge

KAYLEEN MICHELLE PHOTO

Sarro was drawn to architecture and attended the School of Architecture / College of Design at North Carolina State University. Her mother’s best friend – a woman – was an architect, which opened Sarro’s eyes. “I thought, ‘I can be an architect and a mother, both,'” says Sarro, who raised four children and taught them at home, all of which are grown up.

The interior design seemed to fit better, however, and perfectly blends Sarro’s interest in art, design and helping others.

She has kept her artistic skills – still hand-rendering all of her clients’ interior designs – and is particularly fond of watercolor. As a young mother she taught art to local children, and later Elizabeth Kincaid’s book Paint Watercolors that Dance with Light fueled her passion for painting. Although she has sold many of her works and continues to exhibit, she did not want to try to make a living from painting. And she’s still sewing and creating bespoke curtains for clients.

“I don’t have a favorite style,” says Sarro, whose own home is mostly mid-century modern, while her current projects include a Tudor-style remodel, a farmhouse-chic project, and a craftsman.

It is important to her, says Sarro, that she accommodates customers with her style.

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