Donald Trump vows to cease GOP from elevating cash for Rep. John Katko

Washington – Donald Trump told a radio host Thursday that he would work to prevent House Republicans from raising money for Rep. John Katko and other GOP members of Congress who voted to indict him.

The Joint Fundraising Committee of House Faction Leader Kevin McCarthy has deposited more than $ 100,000 in Katko’s campaign account this year, Federal Electoral Commission records show.

Katko, R-Camillus, is one of several dozen House Republicans supported by McCarthy’s leadership committee.Take the house back 2022. “

Trump, in an interview The John Fredericks radio show, pledged to ensure that Katko and four other House Republicans who voted for impeachment are cut off from future financial support from McCarthy’s committee.

“I’ll see who he funds,” Trump said of McCarthy, “and if so, I’ll stop the whole deal. I will stop doing that. “

Katko, R-Camillus, is under 10 House Republicans who voted for impeachment against Trump for inciting the January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

Katko, who was asked about Trump last week, said he should no longer be considered a Republican Party leader. The four-year-old congressman also said he would not be intimidated by the former president.

“I do not withdraw from anyone when it comes to political threats” Katko told the editors of syracuse.com | The Post standard. “I’m not worried about that.”

McCarthy’s joint fundraising committee supported five of the ten Republicans who voted for impeachment. In addition to Katko, the other GOP representatives are Peter Meijer from Michigan, David Valadao from California, Fred Upton from Michigan and Jaime Herrera Beutler from Washington.

“All but one – Katko in New York, he’s not popular, and I think he’s going to get out of the district – but there is an area code for each of them,” Trump told Fredericks.

Trump was referring to the fact that no major Republican opponent of Katko has emerged in Onondaga County, where Katko resides.

The New York Independent Redistricting Commission last week revealed two partisan plans to set new boundaries for Katko’s district.

The democratic plan would Merge parts of Katko’s 24th congressional district with that of GOP Rep. Claudia Tenney in the neighboring 22nd district. Trump has promised to support Tenney when she competes in a primary against Katko.

Trump has also encouraged Onondaga County’s Conservative Party leaders to Put up a candidate to join Katko. to oppose next year in a possible elementary school.

Katko is vice chair of the National Republican Congressional Committee, the fundraising arm for Republicans in the House of Representatives. He has received financial support from the NRCC in each of his previous campaigns.

Do you have a tip, comment or a story idea? Contact Mark Weiner at any time at: E-mail | Twitter | Facebook | 571-970-3751

In a single day On The Cash — Introduced by Wells Fargo — GOP senator: It is ‘silly’ to purchase Treasury bonds

Have a nice Monday and welcome to On The Money, Your nightly guide to everything related to your bills, bank account, and bottom line. Subscribe here: thehill.com/newsletter-signup.

Today’s big deal: Republicans dig deeper into raising the debt ceiling, regardless of the ramifications. We’ll also look at a difficult path in the house for Biden’s massive expense account and the latest inflation information.

But first find out why Angelina Jolie and I was in the same building today.

For The Hill, I’m Sylvan Lane. Write to me slane@thehill.com or @SylvanLane. You can reach my colleagues in the finance team Naomi Jagoda at njagoda@thehill.com or @NJagoda and Aris Folley afolley@thehill.com or @ArisFolley.

McConnell Says GOP “United Against Raising Debt Ceiling”

Senate Democrats are generally expected to pass laws to raise the country’s debt ceiling with a government funding measure to put maximum pressure on Republicans to support raising the credit limit or risking the blame for a government shutdown.

But Senate minority leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) Said Tuesday that Republicans Vote unanimously thwart any government funding bill that would also raise the country’s debt ceiling.

“Republicans agree against raising the debt ceiling,” McConnell said when asked after a GOP conference whether Republicans would vote for a funding gap that extends the federal government’s ability to borrow, which is expected to be exhausted by October.

McConnell stated that Republicans oppose raising the debt ceiling “not because it doesn’t have to be done,” but because it would pave the way for Democrats to pass a $ 3.5 trillion human infrastructure bill that does much of it previous would undo President TrumpDonald TrumpBiden stumbles for Newsom on the eve of the recall: “The nation’s eyes are on California” On The Money: House Democrats cut Biden’s tax hikes Abortion providers warn of “chaos” if the Supreme Court Roe versus Wade. overrides MORETax cut in 2017.

Fact check:

  • Raising or suspending the debt ceiling alone does not permit or prohibit new spending, nor does it increase or decrease the level of national debt.
  • Raising the debt ceiling will only allow the US to issue new government bonds, which it currently cannot, and generate cash to pay for expenditures already approved by Congress.
  • The US has never defaulted on its debt, and experts say any loss of confidence and creditworthiness in the federal government could cause the financial system to collapse.
  • Countries, financial institutions and investors hold trillions of dollars in government bonds, the value of which could fall if the US fails to remain solvent.

“I want every single Republican senator to answer the question, ‘Are you ready to bankrupt the government?'” Asked the Senate majority leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerSchumer points to debts incurred under Trump to highlight the need for bipartisan action Warner Says “Under” 0.5 Trillion Housing Aid Package Some say he cannot support Biden’s $ 0.5 trillion spending plan MORE (DN.Y.) on Tuesday.

“Leader McConnell, as I said, is playing dangerous political games by not stepping on the stage as he asked us to and we did when Trump was president,” he added.

Even so, other Republicans, including the moderate Sens. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyCan Biden make a comeback? What history teaches us (and not) Republican leaders misjudged the January 6 committee New Hampshire Democrat wins GOP seat MORE (Utah) and Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanTrump administration sales representative supports JD Vance in Ohio Senate race Crypto debate should come back into force GOP hopefuls fight for Trump’s favor in the Ohio Senate race MORE (Ohio), also ruled out a vote on Tuesday for a government funding resolution that also extends the country’s borrowing authority.

And that’s why Senator Rick Scott (R-Fla.) Told reporters today that it did would be “foolish”“To buy government bonds – an asset believed to be almost as safe as cash – amid the stalemate.

“If you buy government bonds today, [you] don’t understand that American taxpayers are unwilling to levy taxes on it, ”said Scott, although surveys have shown solid support for aspects of Biden’s tax plan

“If you are stupid enough to buy this stuff now, you are stupid”

I have more on that Showdown here.

PRESENTED BY WELLS FARGO

DC Diner is being remodeled with help from nonprofit & Wells Fargo

Sandra Foote, owner of Flip-It LJ Diner, didn’t think her restaurant in Columbia Heights could survive COVID-19.

Wells Fargos Open for Business Fund made a grant to the District Bridges charitable organization, which then helped Sandra meet bills.

LEAD THE DAY

The house isn’t an easy walk for Biden, Democrats with a 3.5 ton package

Democrats say getting the $ 3.5 trillion welfare spending plan through the house will be a tough road Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiWashington is increasing security ahead of the September 18 rally How social media is fueling political polarization in the US – what can be done about it The 12:30 report from The Hill – Presented by Facebook – Man with machete, swastika in front of DNC headquarters before the rally on January 6th MORE (D-Calif.) Can only afford three defectors to enforce the measure.

While Senate debate Having received more attention, centrists are also vocally suspicious of the plan in the lower chamber, while progressives are not at all interested in bending.

Some are already pushing privately President BidenJoe BidenBiden stumbles for Newsom on the eve of the recall: “The nation’s eyes are on California” Biden is looking to the climate to sell the economic agenda The family of an American who has been taken hostage by the Taliban is calling on the government to release the peace negotiator for Afghanistan MORE In order to be even more involved in the negotiations on the package with Pelosi, it will be crucial for the signing of the bill to argue that he supports his own agenda. Hanna Trudo from the hill explained here.

A MESSAGE FROM WELLS FARGO

How a DC Florist Remodels with PPP Credit

Le Printemps DC flower shop was able to stay open during the pandemic with two Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans booked through Wells Fargo.

85% of the PPP loans booked through the bank went to companies with fewer than 10 employees.

MAYBE YOU CAN BUY MY CAR?

Consumer prices rose 0.3 percent in August and 5.3 percent in the past 12 months, according to data released Tuesday by the Labor Department.

Monthly growth in the consumer price index (CPI), a closely watched indicator of inflation, declined for the second straight month after rising 0.5 percent in July. (Economists expected the CPI to grow 0.4 percent last month.)

Annual CPI growth – one of several ways to measure annual inflation – also declined from 5.4 percent in July, the highest since August 2008.

What happened?

  • Airline tickets, used cars and trucks, and auto insurance prices all fell in August after soaring for much of spring and summer.
  • The used car CPI, which accounted for much of the summer’s inflation spike, fell 1.5 percent in August but is still 31.9 percent above the same point in 2020.

I break everything off here.

AOC’S MET GALA DRESS, BUT IN THE LEGISLATION

The House of Representatives Democrats’ plan would impose the biggest tax hikes on high earners: analysis

The House Democrats’ tax proposals would impose the largest tax hikes on households with an income of $ 1 million or more, according to an analysis by the Joint Tax Committee (JCT) released Monday.

The analysis takes into account the Democrats’ proposals to increase taxes for high-income individuals and businesses and to extend the expansion of tax credits for low- and middle-income households.

  • In 2023, households with incomes greater than $ 1 million would see federal taxes increase by 10.6 percent and their average tax rate from 30.2 percent under current law to 37.3 percent.
  • Households with incomes less than $ 200,000 would lower their taxes, the JCT said.

Much of the child tax credit expansion proposed by the Democrats would expire after 2025 – at the same time, the individual tax provisions in the Republican Tax Act of 2017 would expire. Naomi has the details here.

Good to know

Chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission Gary GenslerGary GenslerOn The Money – The Democratic Tax Divide According to Coinbase, the SEC is investigating its crypto loan product Climate hawks are pushing Biden to replace the Fed chairmanship MORE said Tuesday that the rapid proliferation of cryptocurrencies and related investment products is similar the wild West.”

We still have an eye on:

  • There was a record-breaking number of players on the opening weekend of the 2021 NFL season Place bets online As more and more states legalize sports betting.
  • Job searches are expected to increase in the fall as more schools Resumption of personal learning Amid the ongoing pandemic, Indeed’s Hiring Lab forecast in its latest survey.

That’s it for today. Thanks for reading and check out The Hill’s Finance side for the latest news and coverage. We will see you tomorrow.

GOP Pushing For Arizona-Model Election Audits To Unfold Nationwide — However State Officers Already Maintain Discovering ‘No Proof’ Of Fraud

Top line

A Republican-led Michigan Senate committee investigating the 2020 state elections has found there is “no evidence of widespread or systematic fraud” A number of GOP state officials are now pushing for more controversial privately held audits across the country.

Ballots cast in the 2020 general election in Maricopa County, Arizona, will be cast in a … [+] Exam on May 6, 2021 in Phoenix.

RELATED PRESS

Important facts

A report Michigan Senate Oversight Committee, released Wednesday, rejected allegations of widespread fraud in the November election, including several right-wing conspiracy theories regarding electoral fraud, despite senators saying there were “serious weaknesses in our electoral system.”

The senators exposed a theory alleged voting machines swapped votes in Antrim County, Michigan – Senator Edward McBroom wrote that the allegations would continue to be viewed as “an utter waste of time” – and countered allegations of Dominion voting machine fraud promoted by the MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

Michigan’s Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson previously announced in March that more than 250 local audits in the state “confirmed the integrity and accuracy of the 2020 general election”.

Officials in Georgia checked the state paper ballots and found they “confirmed and confirmed” the state vote count, and state and county officials in Wisconsin and Maricopa County, Arizona, have also checked their voting machines and determined that there was no fraud or cases of tampering or “tampered” machines.

Nevada’s Secretary of State Barbara Cegavske – the state’s only nationally elected Republican woman –examined Allegations of electoral fraud in the parliamentary elections and in an April determined report that the GOP’s concerns about electoral fraud in Nevada “do not constitute evidence.”

Pennsylvania conducted a statewide, risk-limiting review of its votes that “provided strong evidence of the accuracy of the vote count,” despite Spotlight PA Remarks that while the audit confirmed that Biden received more votes than former President Donald Trump, it was not detailed enough to confirm the accuracy of the results.

Big number

32%. That’s the percentage of US adults who still believe that President Joe Biden won the presidential election for election fraud despite a lack of credible evidence, according to a Monmouth poll carried out from June 9th to 14th.

Ultimate quote

“The committee can confidently claim that it has thoroughly investigated numerous allegations of illegal activity, improper practice, fraud, vote theft, or any other description that would cast doubt on the integrity of Michigan’s 2020 election results,” it said the Michigan senators wrote in their report. “Our clear conclusion is that citizens should trust that the results represent the true results of the ballots cast by the people of Michigan.”

Key background

Trump and his GOP allies have repeatedly asserted that there was widespread voter fraud in the presidential election, and continue to advance those claims, even as more than 60 GOP lawsuits challenging election results fail in court and tests repeat accuracy the vote count confirmed. Federal and state officials, including former US attorney general William Barr said there was no widespread fraud in the elections, and a Statistical analysis The Battlefield States’ results also found “no evidence of fraud, manipulation or uncorrected errors”. The electoral fraud allegations have prevailed despite the lack of evidence on the right, sparking a new wave of controversial state levels Voting restrictions in the name of “electoral security”. Republicans have now also clung to a partisan and privately financed choice exam takes place in Maricopa County, Arizona, which has the Biden administration said could potentially violate federal law by removing ballots from the control of poll workers. The audit will not change the state’s certified election results, but critics warn that partisan recount could further undermine public confidence in the election results.

What to look out for

Audits like the one in Arizona that is going on now just before the end– could soon spread nationwide as lawmakers from states such as Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Michigan, Oklahoma, Tennessee, and Utah have traveled to watch the exam and have expressed an interest in potentially conducting their own investigations. “You’re definitely writing the playbook here in Arizona to get this type of audit, I don’t want to call it an audit, I want to call it other states,” said Arizona’s Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat NBC news. “And it’s dangerous.” Wisconsin Congregation Speaker Robin Vos announced a new survey of the state’s election results in May and the Republicans are pushing with one effort Investigate ballots in Fulton County, Georgia, and other efforts could potentially be made in other battlefield states such as Pennsylvania and Michigan.

further reading

GOP Investigation Finds No Election Fraud In Michigan, Finds Many Claims “Ridiculous” (Bridge MI)

Voting machines in Phoenix were not manipulated, audit results (Forbes)

The Nevada Secretary of State finds no “conclusive support” for allegations of electoral fraud by the GOP (CNN)

Wisconsin Republicans hires ex-cops to investigate elections as Arizona exam sparks new investigations nationwide (Forbes)

“No Evidence” of Election Fraud in Battlefield States: Statistical Analysis Finds Trump Continues to Make False Claims (Forbes)

80% of Americans are in favor of the Voter ID rules – but less afraid of scams, poll results (Forbes)

G.O.P. Pumps One other $175,000 Of Donor Cash Into Trump’s Enterprise

Former President Donald Trump keeps receiving handouts from the Republican National Committee.

Getty Images

The The Republican National Committee spent more than $ 175,000 in Mar-a-Lago on May 12 for the rental and catering of a venue, according to a financial disclosure filed on Sunday.

Donald Trump retained a 100 percent stake in his private Palm Beach resort when he became president.

The RNC now has Spent at least $ 2.6 million in Trump’s companies, 98.5% of which occurred after Trump became the suspected GOP candidate for president in May 2016.

The $ 175,000 was for the portion of the RNC’s spring donor retreat that was relocated to Mar-a-Lago in April, an RNC spokesman told Forbes.

Many GOP donors enjoyed visiting Mar-a-Lago“A Republican who helped plan the event told the Washington Post when it first reported on the change in plans in March.

Trump lived in Mar-a-Lago from January to May when he emigrated north to one of his golf clubs in New Jersey.

The Trump organization did not respond to inquiries.

Senator Rick Scott (R-Fla.) Presents former President Donald Trump with an award over the weekend the RNC held part of its Spring Donor Retreat in Mar-a-Lago.

Twitter / Scott for Florida

Follow me Twitter or LinkedIn. Check out my website. Send me a safe Tip.

I took an unusual route to get here. In a previous life I worked as a travel and food writer, so in 2016 I was commissioned to open the

… Continue reading

I took an unusual route to get here. In a previous life I was a travel and food writer, so in 2016 I was hired to cover the opening of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC, just a few miles from my home. When Trump won the election and refused to sell his business, I stuck to the story, started a newsletter called 1100 Pennsylvania (named for the hotel’s address), and contributed to Vanity Fair, Politico, and NBC News. I’m still interested in Trump, but I’ve broadened my focus to also track the money associated with other politicians – both Republicans and Democrats.

Read less

Guidelines on state use of stimulus cash prompts GOP complaints, lawsuit – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

(CNN) – Republican officials are in the arms over one of the conditions tied to the $ 350 billion state and local aid included in the Democrats’ massive aid package passed last week.

The restriction, added by the Senate Democrats, prompted the Ohio Attorney General to file a lawsuit Wednesday and his GOP colleagues to write an angry letter to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.

There is a $ 1.9 trillion provision in the stimulus bill that could limit states’ ability to cut taxes. It is said that governments cannot use the funds “either directly or indirectly” to offset a decrease in net tax revenue resulting from changes such as tax cuts, discounts, deductions, credits or delays in tax increases or the introduction of a tax.

The rule can apply until 2024. This is the deadline by which states can obtain their aid.

The Treasury Department said Thursday that the aid is not intended for tax cuts, but that states are free to use other means to lower taxes.

Funding from state and local governments was one of the most controversial measures in the congressional aid agreements. Many states and communities suffered a decline in tax revenues due to the pandemic – although for some the declines were not as large as originally feared.

Democrats attempted to top up the $ 150 billion pot envisaged in the stimulus agreement passed a year ago, but Republicans successfully blocked it while controlling the Senate in 2020.

President Joe Biden’s package, which didn’t get GOP votes, sends more support, but it also includes the tax cut provision and one that bans states from pouring the money into their pension funds, which Republican lawmakers backed.

Entitlement to an unconstitutional tax mandate

Ohio Attorney General Dave Yost filed an injunction with the US District Court in South Ohio to prevent the enforcement of what he called the “tax mandate”. He said it was unconstitutional and exceeded the powers of Congress.

The state that expects to receive Aid of around $ 5.5 billionsuffered a loss of $ 1.1 billion in tax revenue for fiscal 2020 the movement.

“The tax mandate thus gives states a choice: they can either dispose of the urgently needed federal funds or their sovereign authority to determine state tax policy. But they can’t have both, ”the application says. “In our current economic crisis, that’s not an option at all. It’s a metaphorical “gun to the head”. “

Meanwhile, a coalition of 21 Republican attorneys general – led by Georgia, Arizona and West Virginia – wrote to Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday expressing concerns about the provision, particularly the ban on “indirectly offsetting” tax cuts and the list of prohibited measures.

The letter contained a number of tax measures that states are currently considering that officials fear may violate the relief law. These include increasing the standard deduction in Georgia, introducing tax credits in Indiana, and lowering income taxes in Montana.

The attorney general asked Yellen to confirm that the aid package will at most prevent states from expressly using the funds for direct tax cuts rather than for the purposes listed.

What states can do, according to the Treasury

The Treasury Department said the law does not prevent states from lowering taxes or from having to repay their aid if they do.

“In other words, states are free to make policy decisions to cut taxes – they simply cannot use the pandemic aid money to pay for those tax cuts,” an agency spokesman said.

Still, the Biden administration made it clear earlier this week that the aid is intended to deter states from laying off more workers – especially key workers. State and local governments have shed nearly 1.4 million jobs in the past 12 months.

“The original purpose of the state and local funding was to keep and employ police officers, firefighters and other key employees in the workplace, and it was not intended to cut taxes,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a Press conference on Monday.

Yost was not satisfied with the Treasury Department’s answer.

“It’s like saying,” But you can keep your wallet, the choice is yours, “right after the robber said” your wallet or your life, “” the attorney general said Thursday.

GOP Sen. says Trump impeachment trial may set a harmful precedent

Ohio Republican Senator Rob Portman told CNBC why he had joined 44 other Republicans to deny the constitutionality of the charges against former President Donald Trump.

“I think the constitutional question needs to be addressed and not tabled and not put aside, and as a juror I will listen to both sides, but we have to deal with the constitutional question and the precedent that would create. So if you look at the constitution … it’s about the distance, and this is a private person now, Donald Trump, not a president, “Portman said during a pre-recorded interview Thursday night “The news with Shepard Smith.”

Kentucky Senator Rand Paul initiated charges of dismissing the constitutionality of the trial. Firstly, on the grounds that Trump is no longer in office, and secondly, given that the Senate President Patrick Leahy (D-VT) is presiding over the process in place of the Supreme Court Justice John Roberts becomes.

Roberts led Trump’s first impeachment trial, but he won’t repeat the role a second time. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer from New York told Rachel Maddow of MSNBC Show on Monday that the decision to chair it was Roberts’.

“The constitution says that the chief judge presides over a seated president,” said Schumer. “So it won’t be so – so it was up to John Roberts to see if he wanted to preside over a president who is no longer in office, Trump. And he doesn’t want to do it.”

Portman told host Shepard Smith he was concerned about the precedent this impeachment trial could set.

“Think about the precedent of saying that Republicans could go after President Obama or President Clinton or Democrats George W. Bush as a private citizen,” Portman said.

Portman had previously specified that Trump has “some responsibility” for the January 6th uprising in the Capitol. He did not support Trump’s efforts to scrap the 2020 election results and voted to maintain the certified January 6 election results and delayed the count.

Smith pressed Portman on what he thought was an appropriate punishment for Trump.

“A proper consequence, as I have said very clearly, is that people speak before, openly and during and after, and I think that it is also important that the House acted, so there have been consequences that way . ” said Portman.

Portman announced that he will not seek re-election next year, but will serve his term until January 3, 2023. He said he “will not miss out on politics and partisanship, and that will get more difficult over time.” “”