Foo Fighters Headliner at Full Capability Madison Sq. Backyard Gig | Leisure Information

Foo Fighters will be performing at Madison Square Garden later this month.

Hitmaker Times Like Seeds will be on the iconic stage on June 20th, celebrating the first full capacity concert in New York since the new coronavirus pandemic began.

Participants must be fully vaccinated against COVID-19 and receive a final dose at least 14 days before the show. Instead, children under the age of 16 are allowed to give a negative result in the coronavirus test.

The group was able to return to the stage and was no longer happy.

Frontman Dave Grohl said, “I’ve been waiting for this day for over a year and Madison Square Garden is going to have a tough time.

“New York, get ready for a long night screaming together after 26 years of Hus.”

The group “Best Of You” headlined the “Concrete and Gold” tour for two nights in 2018 and performed in 2008 and 2011.

Basketball fans were able to attend the New York Knicks game at MSG throughout the season, with separate sections for vaccinated and unvaccinated fans, but there have been no jam-packed gigs as of March 2020.

Tickets for the show will go on sale on Friday (6/11/21).

Since the pandemic began, the Foo Fighters have released a new album, Medicine at Midnight, and Dave has also announced a collaboration between Sir Mick Jagger and his daughter Violet.

And the 52-year-old singer recently admitted that no matter what he promised himself, he thought it was impossible to take a break.

He recently said, “In this cycle we go into the studio, make records, play in clubs, promote for months, then release records and tour for a year.”

“At the end of this cycle, we are all exhausted and we promise each other that we will never see a hell like this again.

“I say it every time. You should ask your wife. She said, “I always listen -” I’m exhausted. I will never do that again. This is the last. It’s a record, somehow, somehow, somehow … “…

“Within two and a half weeks we’ll be demonstrating s *** and sending it to the band.”

Foo Fighters Headlining at Madison Square Garden Full Capacity Gig | Entertainment news

Source link Foo Fighters Headlining at Madison Square Garden Full Capacity Gig | Entertainment news

Coldplay’s Dwell At Worthy Farm gig is ‘very particular’ | Leisure

Coldplay are playing a “very special” gig on the Glastonbury Festival’s global live stream “Live At Worthy Farm”.

The top group takes to the stage as part of this weekend’s livestream, and the band has urged fans to cast their support behind “the world’s greatest festival and the charities it supports.”

In a statement posted on Twitter, Chris Martin, Jonny Buckland, Guy Berryman, Will Champion and Phil Harvey said: “A very special night on a worthy farm tonight and a home gig for us. Please buy a ticket to the biggest festival in the world To help the world and the festival. ” Charities It Supports: https://worthyfarm.live. Dear c, g, w, j & p #LiveAtWorthyFarm (sic) “

The group, founded in 1996, urged fans to buy tickets for the live stream.

However, they also noted that they can see their performance on Sunday (05/23/21).

In another Twitter message, they stated, “I’m sure you’ll have a few questions on Twitter so I’ll watch with you. Don’t worry if you can’t watch or make a commitment tonight.” Eurovision, reruns tomorrow at 2pm and 7pm UK time. Tickets: https://worthy.live PH (sic) “

Meanwhile, Chris Martin recently admitted that the lockdown experience made him less selfish.

The 44-year-old star is one of the most famous musicians in the world, but he admits that the global health crisis has changed the way he sees it.

He shared, “Last year was quite an eye opener. I said, ‘Who am I without Wembley saying,’ You’re awesome ‘?”

Chris stated that he is no longer trying to achieve self-worth through “external validation”.

He considered: “Right now in my life I am trying not to attach too much importance to being a pop star. I am trying not to achieve my self-esteem through external validation.”

Opinion: AB 5-Type Protections Wanted for True Unbiased Contractors as Gig Work Grows

The artist Roman de Salvo is building an “electric picnic” in the Timken Museum in 2019. Courtesy of the museum

Independent contractors are excluded from traditional employment benefits such as unemployment insurance, minimum wage standards, employee compensation, and protection from discrimination and harassment.

The lack of protection is particularly acute among art workers in California, where 35% are self-employed. This lack of protection includes business owners, sole traders, independent contractors, and gig workers. If independent workers had access to additional social security programs, worker protection and other employer-provided safeguards during the COVID-19 pandemic, more people with unemployment would have had a safety net and our economy could recover faster.

As the economy’s reliance on gig workers grows, California has sought to protect them by making sure they are not mistakenly excluded from the benefits and protections they should receive.

In 2019, California legislation was passed Bill 5 Eliminate the misclassification of independent contractors who should be employees. Misclassification denies the individual the protection and benefits in the workplace. A subsequent invoice, FROM 2257, clarified who should be treated as salaried employees and exempted some jobs and business relationships from AB 5, including creative professions such as visual artists.

While unemployment insurance benefits were temporarily extended to independent contractors under the CARES Act, the legislation has not since extended worker protection or solutions for real independent contractors who do not meet the definition of a “worker”. With so many workers grappling with the COVID-19 pandemic, it has become clear that we need robust safety nets that include independent contractors, gig workers and freelancers.

In a recently published report entitled “Art worker in California, “Researchers from the Urban Institute examine how independent workers can be included in benefits and safeguards provided by more traditional employer relationships. The study examines the need to protect workers by describing the experiences of art workers, a group that is three times more likely to be freelance.

Art work is usually project-based, short-term, intermittent and involves overlapping and simultaneous “gigs” at the same time. As a result, artists also face challenges shared by other independent workers who cannot plan ahead due to unpredictable incomes, limited savings, difficulty paying off student loan debts and providing health care, families and retirement.

When laws were put in place to protect workers, lawmakers had no idea how resilient the freelance workforce would be. Gig work is clearly here to stay, but the social security support and legal protections available to independent workers have not caught up with the changing workforce.

Current law assumes that freelancers are empowered to negotiate their contracts and the resources to provide their own safety net. The report focuses on a specific segment of this workforce – the arts – to analyze these assumptions and identify why accessible benefits and protections matter for artists and those investing in a more inclusive arts field. If we can do this right for artists, we can do it right for the many other gig workers who share their terms.

The Urban Institute report suggests solutions, including tightening classification laws to prevent employees from being misclassified as independent contractors – as intended by AB 5 – to extend worker protection and social security programs to freelance workers and other contractors and the collective action and efforts to scale nontraditional workers to rebalance power.

New forms of collectivization for workers are needed to gain access to affordable benefits and safeguards, gain bargaining power, provide health care and protect workers from discrimination and harassment. Either of these avenues would improve the conditions not only for art workers but also for the millions of Americans who earn a living from independent work.

Also, by providing access to labor protection and benefits for all types of workers, companies can comply with labor laws and share costs more evenly among recruiters, taxpayers, art consumers and workers themselves.

California has pioneered worker protection policies in the past, and this is the time to think beyond traditional boundaries to make our economy more resilient. This is the time for California to consider innovative new ways to extend protection and benefits to workers whose jobs never fit the traditional employer model.

Angie Kim is President and CEO of Center for Cultural Innovation. Amanda Briggs is a research fellow at the Urban Institute. You wrote this column for CalMatters, a public-interest journalism company dedicated to explaining how the California State Capitol works and why it matters.

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Millennial Cash: three issues to know when you’re new to gig work

Shutdowns, layoffs, and pay cuts caused by the coronavirus pandemic have left millions of Americans looking for new sources of income. Those who have recently turned to gig work may be weeks away from financial surprise in the form of unexpected tax bills and insurance coverage fine print.

“These are the top two things most new business owners overlook,” says Chris Russell, a San Diego-based certified financial planner who specializes in business owners and the self-employed.

Don’t you consider yourself a small business owner? Well, let’s start there.

For the IRS, you’re a small business

Sure, you only do grocery deliveries. But that simple act makes you a small business in the eyes of the IRS. And that opinion is the only one that matters when it comes to taxes.

“Basically, you are considered an independent contractor,” said Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit. “You don’t have to do anything super complicated. You don’t have to integrate or do something like that.”

But you have to pay taxes on any money you make gig work. This fact is often an undesirable and expensive surprise to new gig workers. As an employee, income and wage taxes are automatically withheld from your paycheck. That’s not the case with gig workers, says Russell.

“There is no tax deducted on the money you make as a business owner,” Russell says. “That means you will likely owe the IRS a lot of money for filing your returns.”

A good rule of thumb: for every dollar you make gig work, save 30% for income and income Taxes on self-employment. In the future, plan to estimate and pay these taxes quarterly to avoid penalties from the IRS.

And if you think, “I haven’t made a lot. I won’t report it. How does the IRS know?” Do not do it. It will know.

EXPENSE TRACKING IS YOUR BEST FRIEND

Gig work isn’t all money in the bank. They also generate costs. Keep these in mind as you can probably subtract some of them and cut the tax burden we talked about a second ago.

“Keep good and honest records to get any allowances due to you,” said Ryan Greiser, a certified financial planner based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Apps like Stride, Hurdlr and MileIQ automatically track your mileage and expenses for free or for a small fee to help you calculate taxes. Depending on your situation, Greiser says it might be worth exploring QuickBooks.

“It’s a small investment tracking expenses, estimating your quarterly taxes, keeping track of your mileage, and paying your quarterly taxes online,” says Greiser.

You’ll also want to explore the nuances that may and may not be deducted depending on your gig work, says Watson, pointing to Ride Hail Services as an example.

For example, let’s say you drop a passenger off and drive around town to find your next ride, he says. Can you deduct the cost of gasoline used between trips? (You can the IRS Gig Economy Control Center is a good place to find answers to your questions.

INSURANCE CAN BECOME COMPLICATED

The IRS isn’t the only agency that needs to know about your new sources of income. Your insurance agent must also be informed. Failure to disclose your work can in some cases exclude you from your policy. Additionally, your insurance agent can help you understand what aspects of your gig work are covered.

Transporting food or people? You need to know if your personal car insurance covers incidents while you’re on the job (probably not.) Carpooling or commercial auto insurance could fill the gaps.

While the platform you are working on may have a business policy covering you, it will only be activated in certain circumstances. It is important to know the details of this coverage.

Uber and Lyft offer commercial coverage for drivers, but this only applies if you have passengers in the car or are on your way to pick up a passenger after taking a ride. DoorDash only offers liability insurance and only if there is groceries in your car. Grubhub and Instacart do not provide commercial coverage for delivery drivers on their platforms.

___

This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Kelsey Sheehy is a writer at NerdWallet.

RELATED LINKS:

NerdWallet: Self Employment Tax – Understand & Calculate It in 2020, https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-self-employment

IRS Gig Economy Tax Center: https://www.irs.gov/businesses/gig-economy-tax-center

Millennial Cash: three issues to know in case you’re new to gig work

Don’t you consider yourself a small business owner? Well, let’s start there.

For the IRS, you’re a small business

Sure, you only do grocery deliveries. But that simple act makes you a small business in the eyes of the IRS. And that opinion is the only one that matters when it comes to taxes.

“Basically, you are considered an independent contractor,” said Garrett Watson, a senior policy analyst at the Tax Foundation, a nonprofit. “You don’t have to do anything very complicated. You don’t have to incorporate or do anything like that. “

But you have to pay taxes on any money you make gig work. This fact is often an undesirable and expensive surprise to new gig workers. As an employee, income and wage taxes are automatically withheld from your paycheck. That’s not the case with gig workers, says Russell.

“There is no tax deducted on the money you make as a business owner,” Russell says. “That means you will likely owe a lot of money to the IRS if you file your returns.”

A good rule of thumb: for every dollar you make gig work, save 30% on income and self-employment taxes. In the future, plan to estimate and pay these taxes quarterly to avoid penalties from the IRS.

And if you think, “I haven’t earned much. I will not report it. How will the IRS know? “Don’t do it. It will know.

EXPENSE TRACKING IS YOUR BEST FRIEND

Gig work isn’t all money in the bank. They also generate costs. Keep these in mind as you can probably subtract some of them and cut the tax burden we talked about a second ago.

“Keep good and honest records to get any deductions due to you,” said Ryan Greiser, a certified financial planner based in Doylestown, Pennsylvania.

Apps like Stride, Hurdlr and MileIQ automatically track your mileage and expenses for free or for a small fee to help you calculate taxes. Depending on your situation, Greiser says it might be worth exploring QuickBooks.

“It’s a small investment to keep track of expenses, estimate your quarterly taxes, track your mileage, and pay your quarterly taxes online,” says Greiser.

You’ll also want to explore the nuances that may and may not be deducted depending on your gig work, says Watson, citing Ride-Hail Services as an example.

For example, let’s say you drop a passenger off and drive around town to find your next ride, he says. Can you deduct the cost of gasoline used between trips? (You can.) The IRS Gig Economy Tax Center is a good place to find answers to your questions.

INSURANCE CAN BECOME COMPLICATED

The IRS isn’t the only agency that needs to know about your new sources of income. Your insurance agent must also be informed. Failure to disclose your work can in some cases exclude you from your policy. Additionally, your insurance agent can help you understand what aspects of your gig work are covered.

Transporting food or people? You need to know if your personal car insurance covers incidents while you’re on the job (probably not.) Carpooling or commercial auto insurance could fill the gaps.

While the platform you are working on may have a business policy covering you, it will only be activated in certain circumstances. It is important to know the details of this coverage.

Uber and Lyft offer commercial coverage for drivers, but this only applies if you have passengers in the car or are on your way to pick up a passenger after taking a ride. DoorDash only offers liability insurance and only if there is groceries in your car. Grubhub and Instacart do not provide commercial coverage for delivery drivers on their platforms.

___________________________________

This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Kelsey Sheehy is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: ksheehy@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @kelseylsheehy.

NerdWallet: Self Employment Tax: Understand and Calculate It in 2020 https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-self-employment

IRS Gig Economy Tax Center https://www.irs.gov/businesses/gig-economy-tax-center

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed without permission.