Measure A cash to fund psychological well being program for Metropolis workers

Over $400,000 of Measure A will be used to help City of Turlock employees take care of their mental well-being after council members approved a contract on Tuesday.

In a 4-1 vote against Deputy Mayor Pam Franco, the city council approved a service agreement between the city and Florida-based company Performance on Purpose during its first meeting of the new year. Responding to a call for proposals prepared at the request of the council, Performance on Purpose is asking for $417,994 to implement a voluntary mental wellbeing program for city employees.

According to the company’s website, Performance on Purpose’s mission is to “equip leaders and their teams with the tools to reach their highest potential by providing science-based behavior change solutions to improve well-being and performance.”

“People understand that mental health is a business-critical conversation that needs to be had, and that people cannot do their jobs unless they are supported by the resources they need,” said Lauren Hodges, co-founder of Performance on Purpose , to the Council. “And that often has to come from the workplace.”

Two other companies also responded to the bid with cost estimates of $293,235 and $197,700 for the mental wellbeing program, but Performance on Purpose was rejected by City employees for its “strong strategy” and use of “the latest science and research to… human performance” recommended. according to the staff report.

Through the program, city tours and staff have the opportunity to participate in a variety of offerings, including live, in-person retreats (guided only), biometric screenings, performance coaching, and a variety of virtual programs on topics such as nutrition, stress management, and meditation, to name a few to name.

The nearly $420,000 bill will be funded with money from Measure A, a citywide sales tax approved by Turlock voters in the November 2020 election that is expected to generate $11 million in annual revenue.

Eight areas were listed in the Measure A Order – “Protecting Turlock’s long-term financial stability, maintaining and restoring public safety services, prompt emergency and medical assistance to 911, fire safety, repairing roads and potholes, supporting local businesses, Addressing challenges of homelessness and vagrancy and protecting Turlock’s ability to respond to emergencies and natural disasters.”

The program was originally intended to be funded by COVID relief funds from the American Rescue Plan Act, but Council Member Andrew Nosrati requested use of Measure A funds instead as the council continues to explore the best ways to use relief funds. In addition, business owners and community members called to express their dissatisfaction with the use of ARPA funds for the program.

“I’m not judging this presentation; It sounds like it could be a good thing,” said Lori Smith, owner of Main Street Antiques. “…But from what I’ve read, it looks to me like this could probably be about 300 people, and so much of it is voluntary…You have no way of knowing how many people it actually is will use… Can we use it? $400,000 so the public can benefit a little more?”

Councilor Nicole Larson expressed hesitation in approving such an agreement without a city manager selected, after which Mayor Amy Bublak assured her that one would be selected in two to four weeks. The original point has also been changed to say that the program will not begin until the new city manager is in place and the new leader will be the one who will work with Performance on Purpose to implement it.

“My values ​​are that as leaders we have a responsibility to ensure our employees are physically and mentally healthy and capable of providing the best service to our constituents,” Bublak said. “…We sit in a time where we are losing a lot of people who no longer want to work because of the things that have happened in COVID… This is our way of showing them our appreciation. ”

Ecosia launches World Fund to again local weather tech founders

KONYA, TURKEY – SEPTEMBER 13: Rows of solar panels are seen on a Tekno Ray solar farm on September 13, 2018 in Konya, Turkey. By 2023, Turkey wants to generate 30 percent of its electricity from renewable sources in order to reduce its dependence on energy imports from Iran, Russia and Iraq. Due to its geographical location, Turkey has the second largest solar energy potential in Europe with an average of 7.2 hours of sunshine per day. (Photo by Chris McGrath / Getty Images)

Chris McGrath | Getty Images

Ecosia, the search engine that uses its advertising revenue to plant trees, has launched a € 350 million ($ 405 million) venture capital fund to focus on the climate crisis.

The so-called World Fund will invest in the “next generation” of founders who want to tackle the problem, Ecosia said, and measure its success in terms of “climate returns” as well as financial returns.

“Our goal is to solve climate change,” Christian Kroll, CEO of Ecosia, told CNBC before the start on Tuesday, just days before the COP26 climate summit.

“We have been doing that at Ecosia for a long time by planting trees,” said Kroll, adding that the company has planted 136 million trees to date. “But that alone will not be enough to solve climate change.”

research published Tuesday shows that climate technology startups have raised more money so far this year than any other year, and as of early 2021, $ 32 billion has been pumped into startups fighting climate change around the world.

The search engine Ecosia has 15 million monthly active users and expects annual sales of 25 million euros (29 million US dollars) this year. However, the size of its user base pales in comparison to Google, which has billions of users.

Kroll said Ecosia is “extremely well connected to many start-ups in the air conditioning sector,” but could not support them with the money it makes through its search engine.

“Our promise to our users is that if they look to us, we will use the money to plant trees,” he said. “If we were to put that in risky start-ups and then it didn’t work out, it wouldn’t go down so well.”

He hopes that setting up a separate VC fund that will raise capital from alternative sources will help eliminate this problem.

Bill Gates, the billionaire co-founder of Microsoft, said in an interview that aired on Wednesday: Climate Tech will produce eight to ten Teslas, one Google, one Amazon and one Microsoft. The people at Ecosia takes a similar view and believes that the most valuable companies of the next decade will be those that enable a decarbonized world.

Reduce CO2 emissions

More than half of the funding for the World Fund has already been provided by entrepreneurs and large institutions, Ecosia said, adding that the fund has made three investments that are yet to be announced.

“We have invested in a vegetable meat company that is revolutionizing the high end of the market and a cocoa substitute that is reducing deforestation,” said Danijel Visevic, head of investments at Ecosia and head of the World Fund.

The World Fund supports around 40 companies in their early and growth phases.

An important caveat is that every company in which the World Fund invests must contribute to a significant reduction in carbon emissions. In particular, the fund only invests in companies that have the potential to remove 100 megatons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere each year.

“Everything comes back to that number, regardless of technology,” World Fund partner Craig Douglas told CNBC.

The World Fund said it would support carbon-reducing companies in areas such as food and agriculture, transportation and the “built environment”.

Ecosia claims the World Fund is the largest of its kind in Europe, while the largest in the world is operated by Gates’ Breakthrough Ventures and is worth $ 2 billion.

Global VC investment in climate technology has grown from $ 6.6 billion in 2016 to $ 32.3 billion in 2021, according to a report by advertising agency London & Partners and VC analytics firm Dealroom.co means an almost five fold increase in funding.

The VC industry has traditionally been reluctant to invest in air conditioning startups, but Dara Saharova, a General Partner with the World Fund, said companies in the sector established between 2008 and 2013 now have a market capitalization of around $ 800 billion .

“There are a lot of people in Europe who are investing $ 1 million to $ 5 million and there are now some large institutions willing to invest more than $ 30 million per company,” said Douglas. “But there is practically no one in between.” He added that the World Fund was created to fill the void.

Hedge fund sells stake in Trump SPAC agency DWAC after merger information

At least one hedge fund has its stake in the SPAC. sold Digital World Acquisition Corp. after The company announced plans to merge with the social media company planned by the former president Donald Trump.

Lighthouse Investment Partners, one of at least nine hedge funds that hold shares in Digital World Acquisition, abandoned its stakes in this particular acquisition company after learning of its merger with Trump’s Venture, the fund told CNBC on Friday.

Lighthouse owned 3.2 million shares, or 11.2% of the SPAC, according to a government filing dated Sept. 30.

“Lighthouse was unaware of the upcoming merger and no longer holds unrestricted shares in SPAC,” the fund said. When asked if Lighthouse had benefited from its DWAC investment, the company said it would not comment.

The sell-off came when DWAC saw that a huge surge in stock price on Thursday following the merger news.

DWAC shares up more than 100% on Friday after the share price more than quadrupled in the previous session.

It’s not clear whether the hedge fund was sold to capture profits from its stake in DWAC or whether it was concerned about the risk of being associated with Trump, who was twice indicted and accused as president of the fatal one For instigating the January 6th Capitol Rebellion among his followers.

The social media app is developed by the Trump Media and Technology Group (TMTG).

Rafael Henrique | LightRakete | Getty Images

SPACs, also known as blank check companies, are formed to raise capital from the public stock markets and then use that cash to merge with a private company that has or will have an actual operating business.

The shares of this merged company will then be traded under the stock market ticker created by SPAC.

Investors in SPACs are generally unaware of the identity of the other company being considered for a merger.

Among the other hedge funds listed as major DWAC shareholders in September, DE Shaw owned 8% of SPAC, or 2.4 million shares, while ARC Capital held nearly 18%, or 6.6 million shares.

Other funds that held stakes in the last month prior to the announcement of the merger were Saba Capital Management, Highbridge Capital Management, Lighthouse Investment Partners, K2 Principal Fund, ATW Spac Management, Boothbay Fund Management, and RG Capital Management.

Highbridge Capital Management and ATW Spac Management declined to comment when asked if they would keep shares in DWAC, and the rest of the hedge funds did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.

Another fund listed as a major DWAC investor is ARC Global Investments II, LLC.

The executive member of ARC Global is listed in a government filing as Patrick Orlando, who is also the CEO of DWAC.

CNBC policy

Read more about CNBC’s political coverage:

In an 8-K filing with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Thursday, DWAC announced that it had entered into an agreement and merger plan with DWAC Merger Sub Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of DWAC, and Trump Media & Technology Group ARC Global Investments II.

Trump’s company, the previously unstarted Trump Media & Technology Group, said in an announcement on Wednesday that his “mission is to create a rival for the liberal media consortium and to fight back against the ‘big tech’ companies of Silicon Valley that have used their one-sided power to silence opposing voices in America.”

Trump was banned from Twitter, his favorite social media platform, and Facebook earlier this year after he was accused of sparking the Capitol invasion.

A top post on the WallStreetBets forum on Friday revealed what the user’s stock portfolio looked like and touted daily winnings of over $ 10,000 from wagering on DWAC. The post calling the former president “Daddy Trump” quickly drew more than 800 comments.

This is the latest news. Check back for updates.

Fall River resident elevating cash for Jimmy Fund to learn Dana-Farber

FALL RIVER – Not many people can say they had a dream that saved their life. But to Fall River residents Sandra BroomeHaving undergone dozens of operations for various types of cancer, anything seems possible.

Broome was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009 and was planning to have one double mastectomy Next year. But that summer she had a dream in which her late father, who himself died of cancer, urged her to get an operation as soon as possible. She woke up, pinched herself, and convinced her doctors to let her do the mastectomy three weeks later.

“They called me 14 days later and told me to sit down,” she said. The surgery revealed that she had three different types of cancer in her breasts, including one that could possibly have spread to other parts of her body.

In the years that followed, Broome, 45, had 53 surgeries, and the number is rising, and more are planned for this fall. Since her mastectomy, she has faced one hurdle after another. Tumors have appeared in other parts of her body, she had to undergo treatment to correct complications from radiation therapy to her hip, and her breast implants had to be replaced several times due to government recalls.

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“I look like a map,” she said about all of her scars, radiation burns and radiation tattoos.

But Broome has maintained an indomitable optimism throughout her countless surgeries and painful recovery. She said she developed a routine to make sure she walks into her treatments with a smile on her face and jokes with the anesthetist.

“I’m doing a dance, I’m joking around,” she said.

Now she’s helping to raise money for cancer treatment and research through various cancer walks and other fundraising drives. She currently heads a fundraising team, Sandra Stark, for next month Jimmy Fund Walk in aid of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The walk is virtual this year, so on October 3rd she will be walking around Boston’s Castle Island.

Heal and Help:Former Taunton State Hospital Patient Wants To Help Others Transcend And “Fly”

And Broome said she wanted to let other people facing similar challenges know what they think is the best way to endure the grueling treatment process.

“Laughter heals,” she said of what she attributes to her treatment providers at Dana-Farber who they taught her. “So many people are stressed and I get it. But stress doesn’t help the body. “

It’s not about never feeling sad or discouraged, but it’s important to have a positive attitude, she said.

“Strong people cry too,” she says. But: “If I have to have 100 operations, I’m here. Cancer and tumors will not defeat this lady. “

Audrey Cooney can be contacted at acooney@heraldnews.com. Support local journalism by purchasing a digital or print subscription to The Herald News today.

How A lot Cash Do You Actually Want in Your Emergency Fund?

Image for the article titled How Much Money Do You Really Need in Your Emergency Fund?

Photo: Vitalii Vodolazskyi (Shutterstock)

While most financial professionals agree that a total of three to six months of spending should be set aside for emergencies, this advice can be pretty far-reaching – especially with such a large sum of money. Here’s a look at what barebones expenses should be included in your emergency fund and how to know if you should be aiming for just three months, six months, or even more.

What is an emergency fund?

A Emergency fund is a cash reserve that covers financial emergencies such as job loss, unexpected medical bills or vehicle repairs. Unlike higher risk investments like IRAs or 401 (k) s, an emergency fund can be withdrawn on short notice with no penalties or fees. It is generally recommended that you set up your emergency fund before you start investing. However, if you’re struggling to keep up with high-yield debt (over 10% APY), pay it off first.

How to calculate your emergency fund

Experts recommend setting aside expenses for three to six months. Living from paycheck to paycheck may sound a little like a joke, but it can help focus on more short-term goals and then build your emergency fund. For example, you can start with a three month goal by writing down the totals for the monthly expenses you will have to pay:

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  • Housing / rent
  • eat
  • Health insurance
  • Utilities
  • transport
  • debts

Expenses that you wouldn’t include (at least not yet) would include the monthly “Nice to Have” expenses like this:

  • Restaurants
  • Entertainment (including streaming subscriptions)
  • vacations
  • Other savings

To help you add up the expenses, consider using this Emergency Fund Calculator powered by Fool.com. In the process, you might be surprised by some hidden expenses that can be diverted into an emergency fund, like a stray subscription service that you hardly use or money that is spent on restaurant meals. In either case, the goal is to set up a portion of the savings that will be used to replenish your emergency reserves.

There’s no consensus on how fast to build your emergency reserve, but since it’s for emergencies, the faster you can do this, the better (a reasonable goal would be to spend at least a month in a year). Starting from scratch should save $ 1,000 as an achievable starting goal (only 40% of Americans saved enough money to cover an unexpected $ 1,000 expense).

Follow the 3/6/9 rule

Since spending for three to six months is a wide range, so should that 3/6/9 rule to find out how much to save in your emergency fund:

  • Save three months on expenses if: You will have a secure job, a steady paycheck, minimal debt, and live alone with no mortgage or dependents. You can get away with a much smaller emergency fund if you always have the option of living with your parents as a last resort.
  • Save six months on expenses if: They have children and large debts such as mortgages and student loans. With dependents, you will need more pillows.
  • Save nine months on expenses if: You have an insecure job or an irregular income, e.g. B. Contract or freelancer. If you have children and are the sole breadwinner in your family, ideally you will have a cash fund to cover expenses for nine months.

Where should you keep your emergency fund?

The most important thing you need in an emergency financial fund is liquidity – the ability to access that cash quickly with no penalties or fees. Because of this, you would keep this money in a savings, checking, or money market account instead of locking it in an investment like an IRA. This Lifehacker post will walk you through your options.

Report: Utah Board Misused Public Cash on Fossil Gas Tasks, Didn’t Fund Rural Neighborhood Wants

SALT LAKE CITY – The Utah Clean Infrastructure Coalition publishes a report Today it is revealed that the Utah Permanent Community Impact Fund board has allocated more than $ 109 million in public funds to projects to promote or expand fossil fuel extraction in violation of federal mineral leasing law.

The report also documents that needed infrastructure projects in rural communities are not being funded while Utah leaders are using federal leases and royalties to help the fossil fuel industry, including a planned oil railroad and oil refinery.

“Utahns are deeply damaged by drought, forest fires, smoke and extreme weather exacerbated by fossil fuels,” said Deeda Seed of the Center for Biodiversity. “It is outrageous that Utah leaders are using public money to subsidize the fossil fuel industry that is causing this climate crisis. That has to end now. We need to invest in sustainable, resilient infrastructure for all communities in Utah. “

Oil, gas, and coal companies pay the federal government the right to develop federally owned minerals on public land and pay royalties for any minerals they mine. Congress intended to use this money to help rural communities facing rapid growth and infrastructure problems due to fossil fuel extraction.

Utah is responsible for distributing the money to the affected communities. However, today’s report noted that much of that administered by the governor-appointed Permanent Community Impact Fund Board has been used to enable fossil fuel extraction. Meanwhile, millions of dollars in community projects identified by rural communities have not been funded, including water and sanitation services, recreation centers, road improvements, and public safety equipment.

“I have stayed out of politics since I left office, but I cannot remain silent when I witness the misconduct of the elected and appointed people who represent the people of Utah,” said the former Salt Lake City mayor and State MP Jackie Biskupski at a press conference on the steps of the State Capitol. “I respectfully urge the Department of the Interior and the Bureau of Land Management to conduct a thorough investigation of state mineral lease spending in the state of Utah since 2009 and to take the necessary steps to ensure that local Utah communities receive these funds for their community- and infrastructure projects. “

Today’s report reinforces the findings of a 2020 report from Utah’s Office of the Legislative Auditor General, who raised serious concerns about the Community Impact Board, including the board’s failure to properly fund economic development projects. Despite the findings and recommendations of the audit, the board of directors continued to abuse public funds.

“We call on the legislature and the Utah Community Impact Board to adopt the recommendations set out in the report, including a motion to ban the use of CIB public funds on projects designed to promote or facilitate the extraction of fossil fuels, in accordance with federal law. “Said Carly Ferro, executive director of the Sierra Club’s Utah Chapter. “The Sierra Club will continue to hold regulators and industry accountable for ensuring that polluters are given priority over people. We must continue to invest in communities, people and the environment, and only together can we achieve what is possible. “

“The misuse of money by the Community Impact Fund Board, which is legally intended to help communities affected by the dirty fossil fuel industry, is reprehensible and illegal,” said Jonny Vasic, executive director of Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment. “These funds should be used to help local communities deal with the impact of the mining industry, not to duplicate a polluting industry that affects people’s health and contributes to climate change.”

Utah Clean Infrastructure partners include the Center for Biological Diversity, Southern Utah Wilderness Alliance, Sierra Club, Rural Utah Project, Utah Physicians for a Health Environment, Utah Tar Sands Resistance, Living Rivers, Utah Environmental Caucus, No Coal In Oakland, No Coal In Richmond and the Healthy Environment Alliance of Utah (HEAL Utah).

ALDOT Strikes Highway Cash to Admin Fund | Information

The Alabama Department of Transportation recently withdrew $ 7 million from a street fund to cover administrative expenses for the last three months of the fiscal year.

The department said the move was legal and typically late in a fiscal year. The money comes from ALDOT’s public road and bridge fund, which is largely made up of gas tax revenue and federal fund revenue, but not the 2019 gas tax increase. This account, known as the Rebuild Alabama Fund, is allowed to do so expressly not diverted from road and bridge projects for other purposes.

Government agencies often transfer funds allocated by law between funds during a fiscal year as permitted by law. The measures must run through the Ministry of Finance.

Still, the decline in street funding and the surge in administrative funding, first reported on Monday by the Alabama Daily News, has paused some lawmakers.

Rep. Andrew Sorrell, R-Muscle Shoals, was one of the few lawmakers to vote against the 2019 gas tax increase, despite requirements in the bill that new revenue should not be “non-integrally” used for salaries and benefits, new equipment or construction A Rebuild Alabama Fund was also created to collect the new tax revenue.

“That sort of thing happens in government all the time,” said Sorrell on Monday. “They say, ‘Okay, we’re collecting this new school property tax and it’s only going to be used to build new schools.’ Okay, great. But then other money is released in another bank account that you don’t have to spend on a new school and you can do whatever you want with it. “

In June, ALDOT Commissioner John Cooper said in a letter to Governor Kay Ivey that the transfer was necessary because of an underestimation of the cost of the department’s general administrative program. This financing is based on estimates from previous years.

“Currently, the results of the underestimation require additional spending powers to perform administrative functions for the duration of the fiscal year,” he wrote.

The fiscal year ends on September 30th.

“It’s not uncommon for government agencies to get this type of approval late in a fiscal year,” ALDOT spokesman Tony Harris said Monday when asked by the Alabama Daily News. “This is about getting spending powers in a certain budget category, not a money transfer. ALDOT is one of at least seven government agencies that have found it necessary to shift spending powers from one budget category to another. The budgets for this fiscal year are based on two-year-old projections, so it is not uncommon for these changes to be made in the last quarter of a fiscal year. “

Senator Chris Elliott, R-Daphne, said Monday he wanted to know why ALDOT’s management fund needed extra cash to close the year.

“I am always concerned when money that could be used for infrastructure is used for overheads,” Elliott said.

“That’s why we expressly forbid this when we passed Rebuild Alabama (transfers away from road projects).”

The 2021 General Fund budget allocated $ 142.1 million to ALDOT’s General Administration Program and $ 1.3 billion to the Surface Transportation Improvement and Maintenance Program. There was a separate allocation of $ 160.9 million under the Rebuild Alabama program.

For fiscal 2021, ALDOT had total funds of $ 1.6 billion, according to the Legislative Services Agency. Almost 57% of that money came from government funds. The rest was federal and local.

GM cash helps fund workforce improvement | Information, Sports activities, Jobs

YOUNGSTOWN – A portion of the $ 1.5 million General Motors donated to the Mahoning Valley Manufacturers Coalition when the state reclaimed tax incentives from the automaker is being used for real grassroots effort to train people in manufacturing professions.

The workforce development organization has teamed up with the Youngstown subsidiary of the National Center for Urban Solutions and United Returning Citizens, based in Youngstown, to get the message across on the streets and in grocery stores – everywhere in Mahoning Valley really – there are plenty of jobs and on-call training available available.

“It’s just about having these conversations and asking people where you are and where you want to be.” said Jessica Borza, executive director of the manufacturing coalition.

Ongoing efforts in Trumbull, Mahoning and Columbiana counties result in the Manufacturing Coalition working with select employers through their WorkAdvance program, which helps identify and train applicants.

WorkAdvance, which is funded by a federal grant, teaches people without manufacturing knowledge the ABCs of manufacturing in order to prepare for entry and further development in this area.

It is the responsibility of the National Center for Urban Solutions and United Returning Citizens to recruit people to participate in the program that promises them a job upon successful completion.

“What we found prior to this project was the recruitment for a career in generic manufacturing that was ineffective.” said Borza. “Job seekers want to know what that means, where do I go, what do I get paid? So MVMC works with employers in advance to tell them what vacancies you have. Would you make a commitment to include a course in the WorkAdvance program? So that’s their commitment … and that’s NCUS and URC’s mission to recruit, and that’s how they recruit at WorkAdvance. “

Training takes place at career and tech centers in Trumbull and Mahoning counties, as well as at Youngstown State University’s new $ 12 million excellence training center, the latter through a partnership with Eastern Gateway Community College, which is part of the training center .

The YSU training center received Borza, education and training partner and state leader, Lt. Gov. Jon Husted and Lydia Mihalik, director of the Ohio Department of Development, for a discussion on human resource development.

While touring the new high-tech facility, Husted, Mihalik, and others were able to see a group of students from the WorkAdvance program in class.

Kudos for the facility, which is seen as the cornerstone of the region’s efforts to create an ecosystem for human resource development to meet the growing demands of the region’s emerging high-tech markets.

He also called for preparation for the next generation of jobs and industries on the way, pointing out that the equipment is the same type of equipment that high-tech manufacturers in Ohio, the US and around the world use .

“I go all over Ohio. I’ve never seen a more impressive system than this. “ said Husted, who leads the state’s workforce development efforts.

“I ask, I ask for everyone who listens to come and get your skills; come here and do your training … but training cannot be given to you, it has to be taken. “ said Husted.

The center is a two-story research and innovation space with space for research and design in additive manufacturing, automation and robotics training, CNC machining courses (Computerized Numerical Control), metrology and CT scanning, and training in industrial maintenance.

There is also the so-called “Foundry of the future” This includes advanced mold making technology and office space that can be rented from industrial partners.

Dionne Dowdy is the executive director and co-founder of URC, which works to help people return home from prison. Hiring employers represent an untapped demographic and they can help fill the void by connecting them to training opportunities.

“We say if we get a percentage of that, that’s a whole new workforce that isn’t even tapped.” said Dowdy.

The $ 1.5 million in MVMC is part of $ 12 million GM pledged to invest in the Mahoning Valley for breaking tax credit agreements with the state when it closed its Lordstown plant in 2019. YSU, Lordstown and the Eastgate Regional Council of Governments also received money from the settlement.

rselak@tribtoday.com

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SOCA raises cash for the Matt Henderson fund

CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (WVIR) – Children in the area play soccer to raise money for other children who are financially unable to do so. The Soccer Organization of Charlottesville Area (SOCA) held a fundraiser for children who can’t afford to join a soccer league.

20 teams came together to raise money for SOCA’s Matt Henderson Fund, which supports their outreach program.

They provide soccer for children who want to play regardless of their solvency. They believe that football is more than just athletic skills, but also the experience behind it.

“We all love football here, we love to play, but we believe that it teaches a lot of things that go beyond sport,” said SOCA President Don Long. “It teaches elders and teachers who are attentive and team-minded, so we’re really looking for ways for children to play.”

All arbitrators have volunteered their time to ensure that the fund receives all of the profits from the event.

The event itself raised a few thousand dollars, but it takes the fund nearly a hundred thousand to fully meet its needs and help every child.

If you’d like to help donate, you can too. walk Outreach Program – Charlottesville Area Football Organization (socaspot.org)

Copyright 2021 WVIR. All rights reserved.

Circle Metropolis Wiffle Ball All-Star Evening raises cash for childhood most cancers fund – WISH-TV | Indianapolis Information | Indiana Climate

INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – When Brendan Dudas first decided to do the Circle City Wiffle Ball League, it was just a way to keep in touch with some of his childhood friends.

In middle school, he invited friends to play in his parents’ garden.

Now, a few years later, his league has eight teams, sponsors, and the same field he grew up in is now called “The Dirtyard,” which has come to be known as one of the best in the country for the sport. During the season they compete against each other until they crown a league champion, but what Dudas can look forward to the most is what happens shortly afterwards.

They’ve been watching the league since 2014 All-star night grow with the thing behind it: “Wifflin ‘For Whitley”.

The fundraiser is named after Dudas’ niece, who died in 2015 fighting a rare form of brain tumor called DIPG. All of the money they raise at the event goes towards research and projects allocated to the Whitley’s Wishes Fund. Dudas says it is a way to make people aware of cancer while keeping their memories alive.

He says there were 18 people in attendance on their first All-Star Night in 2014, but in seven years he has seen support for the event and cause grow significantly.

“Now people are lining the fence with fireworks,” said Dudas. “It’s wonderful. I can’t put into words what it means, and it’s on the back of everyone in the community and all of the players who come here and really care about what we do.”

Check out the videos to learn more from Dudas and League Deputy Commissioner Rudy Lyon, who also got to test some of his best pitches at News 8’s Randall Newsome.

click here to get tickets to the Circle City Wiffle All-Star Night.