NJ soccer rejoice in type with enjoyable postgame chants, dances

Smart fans don’t leave after a good high school soccer game ends.

For many of them, the show is just around the corner.

The after-game celebrations, or “cellos”, have taken on a life of their own in North Jersey. Wayne Valley football players swing axes in a wooden stump symbolizing hard work. Cresskill players kiss the grass. After the games at Park Ridge, ‘Carry on Wayward Son’ is booming.

It is pandemonium of the best kind. These moments are not rehearsed, but they are scripted. There is a form that you need to follow but you need to be on it to know your role.

While the post-game will always be special after a win where a coach congratulates his team and everyone indulges in the success, there are some who have taken it to the next level.

With the 2021 soccer playoffs starting, it’s a reminder that big football in North Jersey includes big celebrations.

Smoke them boots

Rashid Darrisaw swears he’s not that coach type.

But the DePaul defense coordinator since 2018 is the loud man in the middle of the Spartans post-game festival.

“A team I used to play for, there was a chant that we used when we beat a team by a large margin,” said Darrisaw. “They know the kids are checking out your YouTube highlights to see if you were good and they stumbled upon that chant.”

The singing? “Smoke they boots” or “smoke dem boots” or “smoke dey boots”, depending on your preference.

“I let him handle it,” laughed DePaul head coach Nick Campanile. “The kids love it. You can’t wait. I’m getting out of the way. “

The first time DePaul smoked a boot was in 2017, when the Spartans defeated Don Bosco. The children asked Darrisaw if they could sing the chant they had seen. Now it happens after every big win.

It goes like this: Darrisaw is persuaded to get into the middle of a ring of players. Everything is said twice. Darrisaw begins with the words “We smoked the boots!” and the players repeat it. Then he says “I love it!” and the players repeat that, then it says “we are unstoppable”.

The very last line is not scripted. Darrisaw is coming up with that right now. But the scene always ends the same: a deafening cheer.

“As long as the children love it. It’s more of an energy thing, ”said Darrisaw. “As long as the energy is high and the children are there, it’s fun.”

Sing through the years

Adam Baeira had just won his first game as the Ramsey football coach at Point Pleasant Boro in 2020 and gathered his team to “sing a little”.

Then he realized they had no idea what he was talking about.

“I just said repeat after myself and they did pretty well,” said Baeira, whose team are 9-0 in 2021.

Of all the post-game celebrations in North Jersey, the “singing” ones have been around for decades. Baeira readily admits he stole it from his mentor Greg Toal at Don Bosco. Greg Tanzer also did a version of this when he was at Fair Lawn.

How did it start Who knows? It could go back to Toal’s game days at Hasbrouck Heights.

It’s basically a moment when the coach gathers his team around him and yells, “Can someone beat this team from Ramsey (or Fair Lawn or Bosco)?” three times with the team’s answer: “Hell no!” unanimously.

In the end everyone throws a fist in the air and screams.

Ramsey doesn’t “sing” after every game. Baeira said it was an organic decision that is happening right now.

“It’s for the best,” he said. “For those 10 seconds or so, it’s pretty rewarding for a coach to see the kids excited and happy after a big win.”

The last Dance

St. Joseph football in Bergen Catholic on Saturday October 16, 2021. Bergen Catholic celebrates victory over St. Joseph.

Bergen Catholic’s post-game victory celebration is the most elaborate in North Jersey.

The Crusader players traditionally run to their student department, stand nearby and sing the school’s alma mater. The team, cheerleaders, fans and parents then all run into the field to coach Vito Campanile’s final words to his team.

Toal, now assistant coach at Bergen Catholic, “sang” in the middle of the circle for the Crusaders: “Can someone beat this Bergen team?” but what almost everyone wants to see now is Vito dance.

“Now they’re kind of demanding it,” laughed Vito, whose team is # 1 in New Jersey and 9-0. “I don’t know how it started, a couple of wins and I think we were so excited it turned into dance moves. I think I can do a pretty good balancing act at 47, but I’m not going to lie, it hurts my knee. “

“He’s awful,” quipped Nick (remember, they’re brothers). “You have to see him at a wedding. He’s the worst. “

Aside from Vito’s dancing skills – I think he moves pretty well – the moment embodies what high school football is supposed to be about: fun, enthusiasm, excitement.

“Having fun is such a big part of our job,” said Vito. “If it’s not just fun, it becomes mundane. I don’t know why you don’t want to have fun with the boys. I think our changing room is fun. We laugh all the time. “

Vito and Nick are the sons of trainer Mike Campanile, and they both remember the post-game celebrations for Mike’s teams as a little quieter. But maybe if the Crusaders finish unbeaten 12-0 … could they get Mike to show a move or two?

“That would be epic,” said Vito.

Darren Cooper is a high school sports columnist for NorthJersey.com. Sign up today for full access to live scores, breaking news and analysis from our Varsity Aces team. To get the latest news straight to your inbox, Sign up for our newsletter and Download our app.

E-mail: cooperd@northjersey.com

Twitter: @varsityaces

Jersey Shore BlueClaws Again within the Stadium, Offering Aggressive Leisure and Household Enjoyable

June 10, 2021

Jersey Shore BlueClaws are back in the stadium, offering competitive entertainment and family fun

By Tim Morris

Professional minor league baseball is back with the Jersey Shore BlueClaws. BlueClaws fans could see their team in action on May 4th as they opened their 2021 season at home in FirstEnergy Park.

One of the most popular summer pastimes on the Jersey Shore is back. Professional minor league baseball and its fan-friendly environment have returned to FirstEnergy Park in Lakewood after a year of absence due to the pandemic with the Jersey Shore BlueClaws.

The BlueClaws, a minor league subsidiary of the Philadelphia Phillies, officially opened the 2021 season on May 4th at FirstEnergy Park.

“There is a lot of excitement,” said BlueClaws director of communications and radio station Greg Giombarrese. “It’s been a unique year for us with the name change, the promotion and the 614 days between the season opener and our last game.”

As expected, the response from the population and regional companies was positive. When tickets went on sale, the public devoured them. Since the BlueClaws played their first home game in 2001, nearly 8 million people have walked through the turnstiles to watch a game. Catching a BlueClaws game became a must.

Due to the current restrictions on the stadium with 6,588 seats, the team cannot currently occupy all seats. Tickets are sold in pods for two to six people with social distancing.

However, more fans can watch the team play in person via the stadium’s 360-degree hall, where they can watch the games from picnic tables and grass berms outdoors.

Aside from simply getting back to the game, there is excitement about the caliber of baseball that is played in Lakewood. Jersey Shore is playing in the High A East division this year, not the new Low A division.

“The players have come one step closer to the Major Leagues,” said Giombarrese.

The BlueClaws 2021 are managed by Chris Adamson and have a roster of 30 people. Major league health protocols are followed in minor leagues. It is more likely than ever that fans will have the opportunity to see players advancing to the big league.

Due to the pandemic and the resulting loss of revenue, Major League Baseball restructured the minor leagues, with many cities losing their teams due to cost reductions. Giombrasse said the BlueClaws were confident the team would be back in business after baseball returned.

“We’ve had a great relationship with the Phillies all along, and we’ve been great partners,” he said.

Even in the single aloop, the BlueClaws sent more than their fair share of players to the next level.

“108 players went to the show from the bank,” noted Giombarrese.

The team has withdrawn two numbers, number 19 from Cole Hamels and number 29 from Ryan Howard. Hamels was an all-star pitcher for the Phillies and the MVP of the 2008 Philadelphia World Series champions. First baseman Howard was also a multiple All-Star for Philadelphia, as well as Rookie of the Year, the 2006 National League MVP, and was a key member of the 2008 Champion Team.

Another positive aspect of the restructuring is the division in which the BlueClaws are located. You are located with the Hudson Valley Renegades (Yankees), Brooklyn Cyclones (Mets), Wilmington Blue Rocks (Nationals) and Aberdeen Iron Birds (Orioles). Having the Yankee and Met teams in the division is a plus, explained Giombarrese, because it helps audience numbers as Yankee and Met teams will draw their fans into the stadium. In addition, the close proximity of the teams makes it easier for BlueClaws fans to see their team play on the street.

The BlueClaws play a 120 game board with 60 home appointments.

Jhailyn Ortiz (13) high fives Logan O’Hoppe (6) after his double home run in the fifth inning that helped the Jersey ShoreBlueClaws open the 2021 season with a 6-2 win over Hudson Valley at FirstEnergy Park in Lakewood. It was the Blue Claws’ first game in 614 days

In addition to baseball, the BlueClaws offer many other activities for fans. In 2018, the club renovated the ballpark and added the Toyota Home Run Pavilion, which includes a nine-hole mini golf course (each hole is named after a former BlueClaw) and boardwalk games and rides for the family. There are also 17 live fireworks nights, including July 4th, and themed nights. Themed evenings include Pride Night (June 4), Girl Scout Family Night (June 11), Father’s Day (June 13), Camp Day (July 6), Military Appreciation Night (July 8), Autism Awareness Night ( August 6)) and Fan Appreciation Night (September 12).

Baseball fans aren’t the only ones happy that baseball is back. This also applies to those who are dependent on work in the stadium. When the BlueClaws are at home, they employ up to 200 people. This is work that wasn’t available a year ago.

The BlueClaws were the Lakewood BlueClaws until the 2021 season. Giombarrese said the team planned to move from Lakewood to Jersey Shore in 2020 to pay tribute to its large fan base.

“[The name change] the next logical step was to take advantage of the support we have from all over the Jersey Shore, ”said Giombarrese.

Household Enjoyable occasions full of schooling, leisure

You can always rely on nature to bring families together.

See for yourself when you stop by the Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness Family Fun in the Forest events. Come to the games and hands-on activities. Stick around for all the practical information and outdoor know-how you will take with you on the go!

The first Family Fun in the Forest event will land on Sunday, June 13th, 2-4pm (Pacific time) in the Lakeview Park Pavilion. The event, sponsored by Sandpoint Parks and Recreation and FSPW, is focused on learning more about the plants and animals in the community’s wild backyard. After all the fun and games, FSPW officials said, you will discover and identify the plants and animals that make Scotchman Peaks so great. Skulls, antlers, fur skins, and other learning tools will enable people to grapple with nature’s coolest facts, a press release said.

After the event, residents are invited to contribute some of this new knowledge when FSPW employee Kelsey Maxwell leads an ecology expedition to Goat Mountain on Wednesday June 16. The expedition is the perfect time to put this identification knowledge to the test. While the trail is steep the pace becomes slow and there are plenty of breaks to talk about the trees, plants, and animals on the mountain.

“Are we going to make it to the top?” FSPW officials said in the press release. “Probably not, but that’s fine because the journey is what counts. It all starts at 9 am at the Goat Mountain Trailhead.

There are more family fun hikes in summer. FSPW hosts a wildflower walk along Blacktail Creek, adventures in Ross Creek Cedars, blueberry hikes on Pillick Ridge, and more. And if you can’t do the Family Fun in the Forest event at Sandpoint this weekend, there is another on Sunday June 27th.

Each Family Fun hike includes a different level of difficulty and new educational topics. Regardless of the overall challenge, the hikes will be slow as the group examines the surroundings and smells the flowers – literally! visit www.scotchmanpeaks.org/hikes-events-schedule to find out all the details about each hike and event.

Are you looking for more ways to explore your wild garden this summer? Keep an eye out www.scotchmanpeaks.org for more great events!

Summer time’s again! Here is all of the enjoyable coming to Nebraska in 2021 | Leisure

Summer fun is in the stars, the stadiums, the swimming pools, the parks and the pavilions this year.

After a tough stretch, we’re ready to do all the things we couldn’t do in 2020.

» If festivals are your thing, you’ll be busy every weekend, starting with Taste of Omaha.

» Musicals are returning to suburban stages: “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee” will be at the Papillion-La Vista Community Theatre and “The Addams Family” will be in Ralston.

» The College World Series is back at full capacity. There’s nothing like a night at the ballpark. And don’t forget the Olympic Swim Trials.

» The schedule is filled with moonlight concerts on lush lawns (or artificial turf, in the case of country superstar Garth Brooks, who plays Memorial Stadium at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln on Aug. 14). Other acts coming to the area include Blake Shelton, Dashboard Confessional and Melissa Etheridge.

» Gallery hopping is one of the best ways to discover local and regional artists. Our listing makes it easy.

» Looking for adventure? Immerse yourself in a deep sea adventure with James Cameron as your guide. Love baseball? Get to know the greatest Black players of all time.

Get ready for all that and so much more in Nebraska this summer. Here’s what you need to know to stay on the go. The pace is up to you.



Summer fun

All the summer fun coming to Nebraska may keep you up in the clouds. 



Summer fun: Check out these Nebraska fairs & festivals making a comeback after COVID

Summer fun: Here's what's playing on live stages across the Omaha area

Summer fun: Museum exhibitions

Summer fun: Spectator sports and other marquee events

Summer fun: Food and drink

Summer fun: Drive-in theaters and outdoor movies

Summer fun: Galleries and special showings

PhotoFiles: Independence Day parades near Lincoln

Girl in patriotic top hat, 2014

Girl in patriotic top hat, 2014

Grace Preciado, 6, rides blinded by her festive top hat in the East Campus Community Organization holiday parade on Friday, July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



5-year-old rides trike in parade, 2014

5-year-old rides trike in parade, 2014

Connor Hall, 5, rides with his balloons in the parade during the East Campus Community Organization holiday celebration on July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



Mother and daughter at Waverlyfest, 2014

Mother and daughter at Waverlyfest, 2014

Natalie Lenz and her 2-year-old daughter, Chloe, watch the festivities on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Seward’s color guard marches during Seward’s grand parade celebrating the Fourth of July in 2019.



Pre-parade pose from 4-year-old, 2004

Pre-parade pose from 4-year-old, 2004

Whitney Jolliffe, 4, is all decked out before getting on her bike for a neighborhood Fourth of July parade in 2004.



Vehicle at Seward Grand Parade, 2019

Vehicle at Seward Grand Parade, 2019

A small vehicle navigates the route at Seward’s Grand Parade on July 4, 2019, celebrating the Fourth of July. 



Tractors at Seward parade, 2018

Tractors at Seward parade, 2018

Byron Luebbe drives one of a long line of tractors during Seward’s Fourth of July parade in 2018.



East Campus July 4th parade, 2017

East Campus July 4th parade, 2017

Harrison Jones (right) and his little brother, Hank Jones, drive a toy car during the East Campus parade in 2017.



Bike riders at 2013 parade

Bike riders at 2013 parade

Youngsters dressed in red, white and blue to celebrate the Fourth of July ride down the street during a parade near Idylwild Park on July 4, 2013.



Abraham Lincoln portrayal at July Fourth parade, 2013

Abraham Lincoln portrayal at July Fourth parade, 2013

Rachel Witkovski looks at her husband, Marc Witkovski, who is playing the part of Abraham Lincoln while celebrating Independence Day in 2013 near Idylwild Park.



Fourth of July Parade at Idylwild Park, 2013

Fourth of July Parade at Idylwild Park, 2013

Youngsters dress in red, white and blue to celebrate Independence Day fill the street near in a parade near Idylwild Park in 2013.



Horses at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Horses at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Members of the Seward County Sheriff’s Posse ride down the street past large John Deere tractors as they prepare for the Seward Grand Parade on  July 4, 2012.



Pair at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Pair at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Dustin Schlake (left) and Patrick Gilson get into the spirit at the Seward Grand Parade on July 4, 2012.



High Street Independence Day parade, 1986

High Street Independence Day parade, 1986

Russell Meyer, 6, and Amy Knight, 10, lead a High Street parade in Lincoln on July 4, 1986.



Doll and candy at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

Doll and candy at Seward Grand Parade, 2012

A baby doll is abandoned in favor of candy thrown by the Seward Grand Parade participants on July 4, 2012 in Seward.



Bike Riders at Indian Village parade, 2015

Bike Riders at Indian Village parade, 2015

Uncle Sam leads the parade through the Indian Village neighborhood during the annual Fourth of July Parade in 2015.



Getting wet at Waverlyfest parade, 2014

Getting wet at Waverlyfest parade, 2014

Seven-year-old Jace Kroger of Waverly gets a little more than candy as a fire truck hoses him and others down on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Girl in patriotic glasses, 2014

Girl in patriotic glasses, 2014

Decked-out in her stylish Stars and Stripes sunglasses, 7-year-old Kaylee Elliott watches as Motega Clancy of Lincoln catches candy from a Raymond Rural Fire District fire truck on July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Girl and mother in parade, 2013

Girl and mother in parade, 2013

Gypsy Anton, 2, sits on her mother Jenny Anton’s lap while riding along in a parade to celebrate the 237th anniversary of Independence Day on July 4, 2013, near Idylwild Park.



Clown at 2003 parade in Ralston

Clown at 2003 parade in Ralston

Phill Harris walks the Ralston Independence Day parade in his clown costume on July 4, 2003.



Independence Day parade, 1995

Independence Day parade, 1995

Children attending a daycare in Lincoln get a jump on the Fourth of July with a parade in 1995.



Uncle Sam at Indian Village parade, 2015

Uncle Sam at Indian Village parade, 2015

David McCreary assumes his annual role as Uncle Sam, leading the Indian Village Fourth of July Parade with a pack of children on decorated bicycles on July 4, 2015.



Three-year-old at 2017 East Campus parade

Three-year-old at 2017 East Campus parade

Aliya Wieting, 3, rides in a decorated wagon during the East Campus July 4th Parade in 2017 at Idylwild Park.



1-year-old rides in East Campus parade, 2014

1-year-old rides in East Campus parade, 2014

Morgan Halsted, 1, rides in the East Campus Community Organization holiday parade on July 4, 2014, near Idylwild Park.



Captain America kid, East Campus July 4th Parade, 2017

Captain America kid, East Campus July 4th Parade, 2017

Silas Moore, age 4, dresses up as superhero Captain America for the East Campus Independence Day Parade on July 4, 2017, at Idylwild Park.



Waverly High School band members at parade, 2014

Waverly High School band members at parade, 2014

Waverly High School band members Maggie Geiler (from left), Skye Wellman, Hunter Buresh, Owen Martin and Josh Post play patriotic tunes as they sit on the end of a flatbed trailer July 4, 2014, during the Waverlyfest parade.



Grandparent, grandchildren ready for parade, 2001

Grandparent, grandchildren ready for parade, 2001

Eileen Lippold is ready for the annual Fourth of July parade in Waverly in 2001, with help from her grandchildren Kody Lundy, 11, holding Kole Fillmore, 2, in the driver’s seat, and (from left) Megan Lippold, 10; Korey Fillmore, 8; Taylor Lippold, 4; and Koby Fillmore, 2.



Colonial honor guard at Seward parade, 2017

Colonial honor guard at Seward parade, 2017

Dressed in Colonial era uniforms, this honor guard was one of the first groups to march in Seward’s Fourth of July parade in 2017.



We want candy, 2014

We want candy, 2014

Sisters Jaylee, 10, (center) and Ryane Cowen, 5, yell for candy during the grand parade at the 146th annual Seward Fourth of July celebration in 2014.



Kids on scooters at July 4 celebration, 2016

Kids on scooters at July 4 celebration, 2016

Ben Warner (left) and Hudson Wright, both 5, ride their decorated scooters in the parade during the July Fourth celebration in 2016, at Trendwood Park.



Girl at East Campus July Fourth parade, 2017

Girl at East Campus July Fourth parade, 2017

Morgan Halsted, 4, preparess to throw candy to the parade spectators during the East Campus July Fourth parade on July 4, 2017, at Idylwild Park.



7-year-old at East Campus parade, 2017

7-year-old at East Campus parade, 2017

Lucy Mayeux, 7, shows off her decorative eyelashes at the East Campus July Fourth parade at Idylwild Park in 2017.



Tricycle girl at 2013 Independence Day

Tricycle girl at 2013 Independence Day

Nadja Madden, 3, rides her tricycle on Apple Street during a celebration for the 237th anniversary of Independence Day in 2013, near Idylwild Park.



Bubbles and boy at Indian Village parade, 2015

Bubbles and boy at Indian Village parade, 2015

Jonah Rabe waves from a wagon that is outfitted with a bubble machine and pulled by his grandfather during the Indian Village Fourth of July Parade in 2015.



Operation Homecoming parade, 1991

Operation Homecoming parade, 1991

A 155mm self-propelled howitzer rumbles down O Street during the Operation Homecoming parade on July 4, 1991.



Parade watchers at Operation Homecoming, 1991

Parade watchers at Operation Homecoming, 1991

Harry and Ruth Robinson watch the Operation Homecoming parade on July 4, 1991.



Squirts on Fourth of July, 2000

Squirts on Fourth of July, 2000

Eight-year-olds Steven Perkins, Andrew Koranda and Jake Suhr relish their roles as crowd-coolers as they make their way along the parade route in Seward on July 4, 2000.



Cooling off during Friend parade, 2008

Cooling off during Friend parade, 2008

The Friend Fire Department cools off Jordyn Ratkovec (left), and brothers Colten and Skyler during the annual Fourth of July parade in Friend in 2008.



Waiting for candy in Seward, 2017

Waiting for candy in Seward, 2017

With plastics bags at the ready, a group of youngsters awaits candy treats as a group of tractors head westbound down Seward Street on July 4, 2017, during the annual Fourth of July parade.



Leisure heart to honor 12 who’ve ‘earned the appropriate to have some enjoyable’ » Albuquerque Journal

Main Event Entertainment is holding a competition to honor people who have done everything for their community. Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal)

Main Event Entertainment wants to recognize people who have helped the community during the pandemic.

The Albuquerque entertainment complex is temporarily closed, but the company recognizes Above and Beyonders. The public can identify families and individuals who have improved the life of the community over the past year. Nominations for the campaign “Every reason to celebrate: Above and Beyond” can be made under mainevent.com/everyreasontocelebrate. The competition runs until May 16, according to a press release from the main event.

“At the Main Event, we believe we are more than just the best place for families to celebrate,” said Chris Morris, CEO of Main Event Entertainment, in the press release. “We are the place where the family is celebrated.”

Twelve winners from the Main Event markets will be selected to win a year of free fun in the entertainment center. Winners will enjoy free activities, games, and food at the main event. The winners will be announced in mid-June.

The Main Event Entertainment also offers a full menu of food and drinks. (Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal)

“Doing good things for each other and sharing moments makes a family family,” said Sarah Beddoe, chief brand officer of Main Event Entertainment, in the press release. “As a brand rooted in creating moments to connect, we have an obligation to celebrate the families that have kept us all going over the last year, and we can’t wait to do it through this incredible program to do.”

Criteria for nominations include local service and friendliness that have had an impact – for example, a father who works as a first responder and has no days off, or a creative mother with a brilliant idea or a student who starts a neighborhood clothing campaign has to donate to a local charity, according to the press release.

………………………………………….. …………..

“We know that there are so many inspiring people in all of our communities who have either worked countless days on the front lines protecting their communities during the pandemic, started a small business that gave back to the most vulnerable, or even made it has to maintain the family unit together through home schooling and multiple jobs, “says Morris in the press release. “These Above and Beyonders definitely deserve their right to have fun, and we’re excited to offer them this opportunity.”

Main Event Entertainment offers state-of-the-art bowling. (Roberto E. Rosales / Albuquerque Journal)

The main event features state-of-the-art bowling, billiards, arcade games, shuffleboard, gravity ropes, virtual reality, a full-service menu and drinks menu, and much more.

The Dallas-based entertainment company was founded in 1998. It operates 44 centers in 16 states and serves more than 20 million guests annually, according to a press release.

Main Event is the main sponsor of Special Olympics International. It supports the cause through fundraising and serves as a venue for Special Olympics events across the country. It is also a proud partner of the Dallas Cowboys. For more information on entertainment, see mainevent.com

Enjoyable Fest returning for 40th anniversary | Arts & Leisure

KINGSPORT – The Kingsport Chamber of Commerce plans to hold a Fun Fest this year like any regular year, and announced on Wednesday that the week-long community celebration will take place July 16-24.

The Fun Fest, which is taking place for the 40th time, did not take place in the traditional sense last year due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Visit Kingsport hosted some virtual events, The Taste was carried out by take-out, and “Un Fest” shirts were sold in place of the traditional Fun Fest shirts.

This year the chamber is planning Fun Fest at normal capacity, said Emily Thompson, director of Fun Fest and special events for Visit Kingsport.

“Some events can take a year off, and we’re still in the process of collecting events. We don’t have a final plan, ”said Thompson. “Key pieces are still in motion, we will have our iconic events and we have new events in the works.”

Registration for the Crazy 8 street race is open, the Chamber is accepting registrations for the Hot Air Balloon Race and The Taste, and concert announcements will follow shortly. Thompson said the chamber is still accepting ideas for events and as we get closer to the Fun Fest and changes need to be made due to COVID-19, they will be made as needed.

Expect some solid Fun Fest announcements in mid-May.

“We believe the community is ready for Fun Fest and we plan to give the community the best possible 40th anniversary,” said Thompson.

Youth distributors have enjoyable and earn money | Enterprise

Ryder Sawyer liked the sound of his wrestling trainer telling him he had it. But Sawyer, 13, wasn’t sure what it meant, so he had to look it up.

From this compliment the name of the new company for young entrepreneurs was born, which prompted him to organize the first youth market fair. Sawyer and more than a dozen other young entrepreneurs attended the event behind the Treats Highway 42 Café in Tenmile on Friday.

Despite his age, Sawyer had several business ventures that resulted in him bringing together other young entrepreneurs and starting Fortitude Rural Youth Entrepreneurs.

Sawyer, a seventh grader at Camas Valley Charter School, explained how the group came about:

“I came up with the idea because I’ve had the opportunity to sell things all my life, because my grandparents own a coffee shop, so I’ve always interacted with the public.

“I realized that I was really lucky and that not all children were able to do it. That’s why I decided to start Fortitude Rural Youth Entrepreneurs. I am a wrestler. One of my coaches told me that I have steadfastness. I didn’t even know what that meant, so I looked it up. It meant mental and emotional strength and courage in everything you do, so I decided I liked this and it would be the name of my business. The rest is exactly what it is, Country Children. That’s what we are and then a chance for us to explore ways in which we can develop and expand our business ideas in rural areas in order to be entrepreneurs in the country. “

The siblings Logan and Maggie Dancer also sold their wares at the youth vendor fair. Logan was selling cups of candy and Maggie was selling earrings.

“We wanted to make some money and have fun,” said Maggie, 9 years old.

Logan, 12, agreed. “It’s going great,” he said.

Nearby, Sydney Saylor, 13, from Lookinglass was selling laundry soap, seeds for a vegetable garden, and starter plants for broccoli, cauliflower and spinach.

“It’s good business and I like plants,” she said. “I think it’s kind of cool to see them grow. It is much better than buying it in the store. “

Ryder said it was nice to see his idea come true. And judging by the steady stream of people, children and adults who came to take a look and buy goods, the event was a hit with customers too.

“I founded Fortitude Rural Youth Entrepreneurs to help, inspire, encourage and nurture young entrepreneurs living in the country,” he said.

Scott Carroll can be contacted at scarroll@nrtoday.com or 541-957-4204. Or follow him on Twitter @ scottcarroll15.