Sew Repair Predicts “On a regular basis” Model and Purchasing Tendencies for 2022 in Inaugural Model Forecast Report

Reveals the pandemic’s impact on developing wardrobes when people conduct a closet clearance

– Two-thirds of Americans – and nearly 80% of millennials – say they intend to replace about a third of their wardrobe¹

– Almost a third of people would rather accept a 10% pay cut than dress for work every day, ¹ contributes to the rise of the new categories of business comfort and versatile athleisure

– Bold colors and patterns on the rise: Stitch Fix predicts Vibrant Magenta as the color of the year, with mint, mustard and purple also popular with women, while men turn to dusty lavender, dark green and coral. Color blocks, squares, and graphics are some of the most popular patterns

– Jeans are back – which is reflected in an increase in customer inquiries and sales from Stitch Fix. People are turning to more casual fits, with wide-legged sales up 70% year-over-year, while trends to “slim” are declining

– People are excited to get dressed up. 44% plan to replace their go-out clothing – 61% of Generation Z1 – as demand for special occasion clothing and high heels increases at Stitch Fix

– The vast majority (81%) of people would like a better way to find clothes that fit them and their lifestyle¹, suggesting that they need a more personalized shopping experience when they remodel their closets

SAN FRANCISCO, Dec 15, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Stitch Fix (NASDAQ: SFIX), the world’s leading personalized online shopping experience, today released its first Style Forecast highlighting key trends for 2022, including Business Comfort as the new workwear category, Growth in versatile athleisure styles, bold colors and patterns and the resurgence of categories such as jeans, heels and dresses. The report also highlights the frustrations people experience with traditional online shopping, such as:

The comprehensive Style Forecast integrates Stitch Fix sales and purchasing insights from 4.2 million customers and thousands of Stitch Fix stylists, combined with consumer surveys and industry data to give solid insight into real life trends – not just on the fashion catwalks . Stitch Fix has billions of style data points, gathered by advanced algorithms and data science teams, from detailed style feedback that customers choose to leave, providing a continuous impetus on what people buy how often and why would.

The story goes on

“From the very beginning, Stitch Fix has brought together advanced data science and a human touch to transform the way people find the clothes that help them look and feel good. From this data, we also gain insight into broader style trends in the marketplace and what motivates those trends – which has been particularly important in the past two years in order to steer changing consumer preferences at an uncertain time, “said Elizabeth Spaulding, CEO, Stichfix. “We hope the Style Forecast offers a fashion perspective beyond the runway trends to help people and our brand partners better understand what’s trending in everyday life as we head into the New Year and adopt a ‘new normal’ together. “

Below are notable results from the Stitch Fix Style Forecast 2022. To read the full report, visit StitchFix.com/StyleForecast.

The COVID closet clearance:

  • Two-thirds of consumers (67%) plan to replace a third of their wardrobe, 33% plan to replace at least half – and nearly 4 in 5 millennials (79%) are likely to refresh their wardrobe

  • Style preferences have changed: 58% of Stitch Fix Women’s customers and 53% of men said their looks changed during the pandemic and they expect those changes to continue in the near future.

Unexpected style influencers:

  • Amanda Gorman is the most unexpected style icon of 2021, as Stitch Fix customer requests for headbands have increased 600% year on year after putting on a statement headband at the inauguration – during Harry Styles is the most stylish celebrity of the year as inquiries mentioning the fashion icon rose 160% from 2020 after its “Love on Tour” shows launched.

  • Meanwhile, Stitch Fix customers are also turning to TikTok influencers for style advice: customer inquiry notes with “TikTok” are up 75% year over year, with some of the hottest looks including Y2K, Cottagecore and Dark Academia.

The color of the year is Vibrant Magenta:

  • Runner-up is purple, mint, and mustard for women – and dusty lavender, dark green, and coral for men.

  • More than a third (36%) of consumers say they will look forward to bright, saturated colors in 2022. Patterns – like color blocks, squares, and graphics – are also on the rise, with 25% of consumers planning to wear them more often. 1

Business comfort (not casual) is the future of workwear:

  • Almost a third (31%) of consumers say they would rather accept a 10% cut in their wages than dressing up for work every day.1 Almost 4 in 5 Americans (77%) have at least some business attire sworn off forever, 1 Almost half (45%) of the people wanted to do without business suits and a third (31%) wanted to do without suit pants. Over half (51%) of boomers say they will never wear a business suit again.

  • A new category that Stitch Fix called “Business Comfort” has emerged, proving that you can have style and comfort that are more sophisticated than the earlier “Casual” classification. This can be seen in oversized stretch blazers, elastic trousers, sweater dresses and new “Knoven” tops (knitwear + woven material).

Denim & dresses return to the daily wardrobe:

  • Jeans sales at Stitch Fix were up 30% year over year, and women’s wide leg sales were up 70%, while the skinny jeans growth rate declined over the same period after “toasting” on TikTok and a fashion trend over the winter “were heading towards style and comfort.

  • Everyday dresses are thriving too, and Stitch Fix has increased inventory by 40% year-over-year to meet demand. Top styles include maxi dresses, which have seen sales grow 60% year over year; Dresses made from natural fabrics such as linen, poplin, and gauze; and bright, upbeat colors and prints.

All-purpose athleisure & performance-oriented active:

  • Athleisure remains the fastest growing category of Stitch Fix, while performance-based active sales also rise (women 300% +, men 100% + YoY) as people discover new sports like tennis, golf, and hiking. Trendy styles in this category are skorts and skirts, bike shorts, hiking shorts and performance polos.

Increasingly on the move:

  • While workwear is all about comfort, more than half (55%) of consumers said they like getting dressed for going out, with 44% actively planning to replace their dressing gowns – 61% of Generation Z. 1

  • To support this, Stitch Fix’s sales in the special occasion category rose 50% year over year, suggesting that people are actually going out again. And fancy shoes grow faster – both boot and high heel sales rose about 70% year over year, while high boot sales rose 150% over the same period.

Offer a more personalized shopping experience

The vast majority (81%) of consumers say they want a better way to find clothes that fit them and their lifestyle. While eager to refresh their wardrobes, they still have huge frustrations with the typical online shopping experience – such as not knowing the fit before buying and scrolling for hours to find what they are looking for want. In the meantime, customer inquiries for sustainable and organic materials have increased by 22% since 2020, which indicates that consumers are placing increasing emphasis on social and ecological values ​​when shopping. The Style Forecast looks at the ability for retailers to offer the things that are most important to people in a shopping experience right now, such as:

Reporting methodology
The Stitch Fix Style Forecast leverages data collected from Stitch Fix’s 4.2 million customers and thousands of seasoned stylists and its merchandising team who review performance and feedback dashboards on a daily basis. Some of these metrics include: sales data; “Like / Love” value, a measure of customer feedback on certain points; “Success Rate” of the number of times an item is held in a fix (the curated selection of items that are delivered to customers); Customer profile data points; and Fix Request Notes, the note clients leave their stylist to indicate what they would like to receive in their next fix. Unless otherwise stated, all statistics on Stitch Fix sales and “Fix” inquiries refer to the calendar year 2021 to date, as of today November 30, 2021. Comparisons to the previous year relate to the 2020 calendar year from January 1, 2020 to November 30, 2020. Also cited is a survey of 1,000 nationally representative consumers aged 18 and over that was carried out by Wakefield Research for Stitch Fix, a survey of 2,000 nationally representative buyers aged 18 and over by OnePoll, market data from Coresight Research, industry trend sources such as WGSN and Trendalytics. All data is sourced from internal Stitch Fix resources unless otherwise noted. All sales data included refer to Stitch Fix sales unless otherwise stated.

About Stitch Fix
Stitch Fix is ​​the world’s leading personalized online shopping experience. Our unique business model combines the human touch of seasoned stylists with the precision of advanced data science. Since our inception in 2011, we’ve served millions of people as a trusted style partner, helping adults and children dress like their best selves every day. The Stitch Fix team is building a transformative and inclusive e-commerce model, an ecosystem of shopping experiences based on convenience and guided discovery that makes it radically easy and enjoyable for customers to discover and buy what they love. For more, visit https://www.stitchfix.com.

CONTACT: media@stitchfix.com

1 survey of 1,000 nationally representative US adults by Wakefield Research for Stitch Fix

Cision

Cision

View the original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/stitch-fix-predicts-everyday-style-and-shopping-trends-for-2022-in-inaugural-style-forecast-report-301445393.html

SOURCE Stitch Correction

Jacksonville would possibly use federal restoration cash on waste assortment repair

The City of Jacksonville will seek to get its delayed yard waste collection back on track by using $ 4 million in federal funds to recover from the COVID-19 pandemic, but the details of how the money will be used to strengthen the Waste collection would be used were not known to be completed.

Jacksonville Mayor Lenny Curry is asking the city council to use a portion of the $ 171 million the city received this year from the American recovery plan that Congress approved earlier this year at the behest of President Joe Biden .

The council’s finance committee took the first step to allocate $ 4 million for waste collection services on Tuesday when it unanimously voted on a list of expenses to be met by American Recovery Plan funds sent to Jacksonville.

City council member Michael Boylan, who is among the council members who has been filing angry complaints from voters for months, said he hoped the Curry government would use the money quickly to improve waste collection.

“I hope Mr. Pappas is already planning how to spend this money,” Boylan said, referring to John Pappas, the public works director, whose division includes the solid waste division.

“We are working on several solutions,” Deputy Chief Administrative Officer Stephanie Burch told Boylan, “and once we have everything sorted out, these funds will be used.”

Corporations across the country have struggled to recruit waste collection staff, and this staff shortage has resulted in waste collection delays in Jacksonville and other cities and counties.

Garden trash has been piling up in Jacksonville for weeks, waiting for a truck and crew to pick it up from the curb. The city has logged thousands of complaints from local residents.

This is a developing story. Visit Jacksonville.com for updates.

Charleston’s invoice to repair flooding is rising. Discovering the cash to pay for it’s a puzzle. | Rising Waters

The cost to fix flooding in Charleston has bloomed to some $3 billion in total, city officials say — a price tag for solutions from cleaning out plugged drainage systems to new, deep tunnels and a wall that could deflect hurricane waves from the downtown peninsula.

In 2017, The Post and Courier asked city officials how much it might cost to fix flooding in the face of a climate that is supercharging flooding rains and pushing sea levels higher. At the time, the estimate was $2 billion, including several hefty projects that were already under way. 

But now that number is rising, in large part because of an Army Corps of Engineers proposal to wall off the downtown area from the water. If the project, still in early planning stages, reaches the finish line, the city would have to pay a portion that’s estimated at around $500 million.

In the meantime, a slew of other work in other neighborhoods in the city is ongoing, chewing up the city’s fund for drainage work and sending staff on time-consuming efforts to secure federal grant funds. In all, the city plans to spend almost $58 million, including grant money, on stormwater and drainage efforts in 2021, CFO Amy Wharton said. 

These projects, Director of Stormwater Management Matt Fountain said, mostly aren’t aimed at preparing for the 2- to 3-feet of sea level rise the city expects in the next 50 years. They’re an effort to fix the severe flooding problems already existing, which have resulted, in part, from years of poor development decisions about where and how to build in the region’s low topography. 



WestAshley.jpg (copy) (copy)

A car drives through water past the West Ashley Library on Windermere Boulevard on Thursday, March 5, 2020, in Charleston. File/Gavin McIntyre/Staff



In an interview with the paper, Fountain ticked off a list of 20 major water management projects somewhere in the pipeline from design to construction, including:

  • Engineered wetlands on the former sites of flooded homes in far-flung West Ashley.
  • Outfall cleaning around the city, in neighborhoods like the historic Byrnes Downs.
  • Plans to divert water around the Barberry Woods neighborhood on Johns Island.
  • New pipes and eventually pumps to evacuate water from the flood-prone King and Huger streets intersection. 

As far as work that will fend off the water of the future, “I think we just haven’t quite gotten there yet. We’re still so buried into the things that we need to fix that are currently causing problems,” Fountain said.

The one exception, he said, is the proposed seawall, which has proved controversial since its inception. The city hasn’t officially voted to move forward with it and hasn’t put together a funding plan for its share of the project. But they will have to certify to the Corps by the end of the year that the city will pay the 35 percent match of the total project cost. There will be time after that point to come up with those funding sources, said Mark Wilbert, the city’s outgoing chief of resilience, because the Corps itself will spend several months internally reviewing the wall plan.

A $1.4 billion Army Corps plan to protect Charleston from hurricane surge changes

“We’re looking under every rock,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said. “You just kind of ask for everything, and at the end of the day, see where you land.”

Ultimately, the many needs of Charleston put it in competition for state funds with communities around South Carolina, and for federal funds with many cities nationally. There are several communities in the Southeast that are also working with the Army Corps on climate adaptation plans, and who may be in contention when Congress decides who deserves funding. 

“This is something the city of Charleston and all coastal communities will be dealing with for eternity,” Wilbert said. “We will be adapting forever.”

Finding funds

Right now, Charleston cobbles together its money for flooding improvements from a variety of sources — a fee on water and sewer bills that covers smaller projects and the budget for the stormwater department, a small portion of property taxes for a dedicated drainage fund, special tax districts and a bevy of various grants. 

The tax districts in particular, usually abbreviated as TIFs, have come to a particular importance in recent years. These TIFs rely on rising property values. When they are put in place, they freeze the amount of money sent to school district, county and city coffers. If the lots inside become more valuable over time, that additional tax money is set aside in a special fund that the city can borrow against or use to pay directly for certain projects.

Take the example of a particularly successful tax district along King Street, which Wharton said has raised $123.6 million since it was established in 1998. It has helped to pay for significant portions of the deep-tunnel drainage system the city is building under the Septima P. Clark Parkway, also known as the Crosstown. When that complex project, known as Spring-Fishburne, encountered a $43 million cost overrun a few years ago, the city was able to rely on this well-performing district to cover some of the difference. 

These arrangements don’t last forever. The King Street district is set to expire in 2023, removing that as a source of future funds. They also require buy-in from schools who are essentially foregoing revenue. Charleston County School District declined entirely to participate in a much newer tax district around flood-prone Church Creek, Wharton said. That fund is devoted entirely to water management projects.

In other cases, there’s disagreement on whether to use these proceeds for drainage at all, as has happened in a special district that covers Charleston’s Eastside neighborhood. Some wanted to use the money for the upcoming Lowline park; Councilman Keith Waring prefers the money help pay for drainage fixes in the historically Black and rapidly gentrifying Eastside neighborhood.



East side project flooding.jpg (copy)

America Street is covered by water after several inches of rain fell on Wednesday, May 20, 2020, in Charleston. The street is one of several on Charleston’s East Side that persistently floods during intense storms. File/Grace Beahm Alford/Staff



In a meeting at the beginning of June, Waring bemoaned the fact that for years the city didn’t dedicate much money for drainage at all, and now the Eastside has needs that will probably range between $15 million and $20 million. A city consultant is studying the area now to decide exactly what projects should be done there, Fountain said.

“We’ve got a lot of good ideas sitting on the shelf,” Waring said, “but the elephant in the room is funding.”

City Council hasn’t made a final decision on how to use the money from the district that covers the Eastside. But Wharton said there may be other options if they do opt to pay for the park, like finding grants to pay for it. 

Grant funding has gone a long way in helping the city design new approaches for the Church Creek basin and Johns Island. Those federal dollars come with a cost, though. It could take months of staff time to fully prepare an application, with no guarantee they’ll be awarded.

A smaller approach

Fountain said his strategy of late has been to aim for smaller-in-scope projects that offer relief now, so residents don’t feel ignored while larger, multi-year efforts are under way.

In one case, that means working on several smaller efforts first in the drainage basin that was next projected for deep drainage tunnels: Calhoun West, which covers the southwest corner of the Charleston peninsula, one of the lowest and most flood-prone areas of the city.

The area is a wealthy one, with historic homes worth millions, and picturesque Colonial Lake, an engineered waterbody the city drains before storms to ensure it does not spill over. Charleston has already done conceptual engineering on a tunnel system there, but isn’t moving forward on the design or permits yet because of many other, smaller efforts.

Donate to our Investigative Fund to support journalism like this

Our public service and investigative reporting is among the most important work we do. It’s also the most expensive reporting we do. We can’t do it without your support.


Donate Now

One, a single shaft tunneling down from Ehrhardt Street, will replicate a portion of the system and connect it to existing tunnels to the north. The city is also working on cleaning out historic brick-arch drains and potentially raising the sidewalk along low-lying Lockwood Drive to block high tides, Fountain said.

“We need to get those things to their next step … to kick out more project work behind them,” Fountain said. “Each thing we can do that moves water out of the basin more efficiently reduces the size and scope of the tunnel work.”



medical district.jpg (copy)

Floodwater covers a sidewalk along Ashley Avenue in the Medical District on July 8, 2021, following the passage of Tropical Storm Elsa. This section of downtown Charleston, home to three major medical institutions, had flooded for decades. File/Lauren Petracca/Staff



The Corps’ wall proposal would also affect where and how the city would build Calhoun West’s deep tunnels and a pump to drain them. 

Just the Ehrhardt Street shaft alone costs north of $10 million, and the money wasn’t easy to find. Officials for the three large medical providers in the hospital district and Tecklenburg lobbied state government officials for years before funding was included in a round of Housing and Urban Development money the state started to parcel out earlier in 2021

In the past, the city relied on large-scale projects like Spring-Fishburne, the more expansive tunnel system north of the area where Calhoun West would be installed. But Spring-Fishburne encountered significant delays in its construction timeline, in part because it was difficult to secure funding in the first place. Fountain said he doesn’t want to leave people waiting for years without smaller relief.

He also urged that the deep-tunnel design will have to fit with other projects in the basin that are being designed or built now. 

Councilman Mike Seekings, who represents that part of the city, said the Calhoun West tunnel project is still an essential one. With spring thunderstorms this year dumping water that piled 2- or 3-feet deep in that zone, “It’s an unsustainable quality of life and public safety model we have to remedy,” he said. 

The problem, Seekings said, is that the city needs to more clearly define what projects to do, and in what order. Fountain said the city does have a rubric developed by consultant AECOM to prioritize projects based on economic benefits, environmental impacts, social needs and future maintenance costs, but the stormwater department hasn’t finished scoring all the proposed projects yet.



Drainage Tunnel (copy)

The city is gradually replacing its 19th century brick arches with a modern network of deep drainage tunnels, such as this one. Ralfael Reveles drives a train through the Spring-Fishburne drainage tunnels on Friday, Feb. 8, 2019, in Charleston. File/ Andrew J. Whitaker/Staff



Local share

The seawall project, if the city decides to pursue it, would be covered 35 percent by Charleston and 65 percent by a federal appropriation for the Corps. The most recent estimate pegs the total cost at some $1.4 billion.

That projection is likely to change, and might have to if the project is ever to get federal funding. Right now, its ratio of benefits to costs, as counted by the Corps, is 2.2. In other words, every dollar invested has a $2.20 value in avoided damage. Federal reviewers usually favor projects with a ratio of 2.5 or higher for funding, a Corps spokeswoman said.

If it does move forward, the project is a pay-as-you-go affair: money would only be due as the design or construction happens. Project leaders have already said the wall construction would happen in four phases.

“That (local) price tag is not something that’s due next year or in five years. It could, in fact, be due over 20 years,” said Dale Morris, a longtime flooding consultant to the city who is becoming its next chief resilience officer in the fall. 

City officials have said the state has a role to play in funding this because of Charleston’s economic impact on the rest of the state. But if the much smaller $10 million bill for the Medical District’s Ehrhardt shaft is any indication, it could be hard to make that argument. An earlier attempt to include that line item in the state’s 2020 budget failed.

Dana Beach, a founder of the Coastal Conservation League who has since retired from that environmental advocacy group, worried whether the city’s political leadership would really be able to convince lawmakers to put up the money. 

It’s not as if legislators are unwilling to pay for large construction projects in the region; the State Ports Authority, Beach argued, secured a vote in favor of borrowing $550 million for an expanded rail yard and barges in the Charleston Harbor

But in Charleston, “We just have this hope that the Corps of Engineers will do something, will put the money in, and we’ll somehow come up with the 35 percent match,” Beach said. “Hope is not a strategy.”

SC's new resilience office tackles question of how to avoid damages from strengthening storms

Tecklenburg said he’s already talking to state and federal officials about how to fund the city’s share.

“You’re not going to find one funding source that’s going to pay for a big project,” he said. At the state level, “I think we can be successful getting a piece at a time, but maybe not get the whole enchilada like the Ports Authority has.”

The first pieces of a potential strategy could come in the next few months. An advisory group reviewing the wall plan is also focusing on possible funding ideas, Wilbert said, as is the city itself. More special tax districts or fees could be part of the picture, he said. The state has also set aside almost $50 million for flood projects, distributed by a new Office of Resilience, but communities around the state will compete for that low-cost loan fund.

Morris was optimistic. He pointed to the federal American Rescue Plan funds that are coming to South Carolina, $2.5 billion in all, which can be used for infrastructure projects. Additional funding through HUD, he said, will also help cities and towns pay for projects to fix flooding before disasters instead of after — a longtime blind spot in federal funding. 

“It’s more positive right now for federal resources to support communities than I’ve seen for a long time,” Morris said.

That may be limited help in the case of the wall project; if Congress funds the Corps’ share, the city generally can’t use federal funds to pay for its own portion without special permission, a Corps spokeswoman said. 

But first, the city will have to decide this fall if it actually wants to move forward with a wall at all. 

Editorial: Broaden approach to Charleston's peninsula wall project to get it right

Used automotive costs to remain excessive till automakers repair manufacturing points

If you’re waiting for used car prices to fall, check out the latest advisories on how a sign that prices have already started fallingsays one of the largest used car salesmen in the United States not to be too excited.

The rise in used car prices is unlikely to slow until manufacturers can start producing cars at pre-pandemic prices, according to the CEO of Carvana.

“[Used car sales] The volume is pretty much in line with 2019, it hasn’t changed that much – the main difference is that so much fewer new cars are being made and that is driving prices up. “Ernie Garcia, CEO of Carvana, said on CNBCs”Squawk box“on Friday.” I think up the supply chains on [original equipment manufacturers] Find out that it is likely to have a lasting effect. “

Automakers have struggled to maintain production in the face of the shortage of semiconductor chips.

fordthat had to cut his North American vehicle production in July and August due to shortages, the earnings report for the second quarter said that the supply was improved but that it lost production of about 700,000 vehicles during the quarter.

General Motors said the chip shortage will reduce its revenue by $ 1.5 billion to $ 2 billion and has been idle some of its North American assembly plants due to scarcity.

Nissan said in May it probably half a million fewer vehicles this year while BMW recently warned that the shortage will creep in by 2021.

The chip shortage will cost automakers an estimated $ 110 billion in lost sales this year, according to a May report by consultancy AlixPartners.

Used car companies see sales increase

Customers inspect a Fiat Chrysler Automobiles NC Dodge Grand Caravan minivan at a Carvana Co. location in Westminster, California, United States on Thursday, May 28, 2020.

Patrick T. Fallon | Bloomberg | Getty Images

The drop in production was a boon for used car dealers like Carvana. The company reported its first profitable quarter on Friday, posting net income of 45 million a year ago in the second quarter of 2021, and for the first time in its eight-year history, it sold over 100,000 cars in a quarter. Carvana stock is up 44% this year through Friday.

These gains have been accompanied by a large increase in used car prices. The average transaction price for a used car was $ 25,410 in the second quarter of 2021, down from $ 22,977 in the first quarter and 21% year over year. according to dates from the online automotive resource Edmunds. That number marks the highest average price over a quarter for a used car that Edmunds has ever tracked.

Debate over when used car prices level off

These high prices have helped boost the used car industry.

EchoPark Automotive, a division of Sonic Automotive that sells used vehicles set a record quarterly earnings of $ 595.6 million, up 88.9% year over year. Retail sales grew 68.9% year over year.

CarMax, the largest used car dealer in the U.S., recorded in the first fiscal quarter of 2022, which ended on 31. The company said it sold 452,188 units through its retail and wholesale channels during the quarter, up 128% year over year.

Regarding when prices might level off, Garcia said, “In the next six months, or even 12 months, I think it’s hard to say.”

“What we are finding is that OEMs supply chains are perhaps a little more fragile than we all would like, and that thousands of parts are being made around the world and waves of covid popping up in different parts of the world I think that makes it really difficult predict when that will return to normal, “he said.

By comparison, Jeff Dyke, President of Sonic Automotive, recently said on CNBC’s “Worldwide exchange“that he expects the chip shortage to ease in the coming months, what start lowering the price of used cars.

“The new car stocks will get better and better in the next few months towards the end of the year,” said Dyke. “This will reduce the number of inventory problems on the used side.”

Group raises cash to repair Springdale volunteer medical clinic destroyed by flash floods

SPRINGDALE, Utah – A lot can happen in a week, as Michael and Helen McMahan can attest.

The couple have volunteered at the Zion Canyon Medical Clinic for years. Instead of treating injured hikers for the past week and getting changed, they had to examine the clinic’s building, which was badly damaged by the historic flash floods that swept through the city on June 29.

The clinic closed this week and the McMahans say they should have turned people away.

On Thursday from Zoom, Helen walked through the clinic and showed what they have fixed so far.

She aimed the cell phone camera at gaping holes in the floor from which boards were being torn.

“Here’s our new floor,” she said of the exposed wood that covered other areas of the floor. She moved the phone closer to the holes, exposing the dirt underneath. “You can see the mud drying down there.

The look in the middle of renovation is a far cry from where the building stood more than a week ago, when stone, rubble, mud, and rain tore through Springdale and Zion National Park, and streets, shops, and buildings like Zion Canyon Medical Clinic damaged.

Video shows the water Sweep away vehicles in the parking lot and a shed behind the clinic that housed medical supplies.

The couple learned that the insurance did not cover a single penny of the damage to the clinic.

“We estimate probably $ 50,000. We do a lot ourselves. And where are we?” McMahan asked, looking around and examining the work. “We estimate maybe a quarter of the way to get the repairs done.”

Springdale Mayor Stan Smith also showed Zoom where things were in town more than a week later. It began in front of the medical clinic, in the now tidy parking lot of the town hall and the community center.

Then he moved on to companies like Cable Mountain Lodge, which he thought didn’t take as much damage as was initially thought.

Related: The cleanup could take weeks after the flash floods hit southern Utah

After the short drive down the street to Zion Canyon Campground and RV Park, Smith explained that the campground is fully open again and that even the pool – which was filled with mud a week ago – is working again.

But the lodge, which is on the same property as the campsite, is still a total write-off and needs to be demolished.

Smith pointed out temporary container-style buildings that now serve as campground offices.

“He brought these containers with him so he could have a job,” he said as he walked around the parking lot of business owner Stewart Ferber’s Zion Canyon Campfire Lodge. “And that’s probably where he’ll be working now and for the next … until he decides what to do with this building.”

Related: Springdale hopes for disaster relief with estimated damage in the millions

Smith stated that they are still hoping for state or federal help, but that relief is months away at best.

“That’s kind of what we’re trying to go through is what is insurance covered? What are the actual dollar amounts?” he explained.

The community has now gathered around the Zion Canyon Medical Clinic. raise most of the $ 50,000 in just over a week– prove to the McMahans what can happen in a week if people pull together.

“We even had a visitor who was seen that morning of the disaster and she saw the GoFundme and contributed to it,” said Helen. “And also left us a very nice compliment.”

“The community has developed a lot, otherwise we would have gone out of business,” repeated Michael. “And we can’t thank them enough. It was just a fantastic response.”

Anchorage officers engaged on a repair after they forgot to price range cash for the mayoral transition

An Anchorage government oversight that failed to provide funding, office space and supplies to Mayor-Elect Dave Bronson’s transition team is likely to be resolved soon.

Congregation vice chairman Chris Constant said previous city budgets have set aside funds for expenses during the change of mayor, such as in 2009 when $ 60,000 was budgeted for former Mayor Dan Sullivan’s transition into office.

Constant said the assembly would vote at its next meeting on Tuesday to allocate a likely similar amount to Bronson’s team.

Since winning the runoff election on May 11, Bronson has assembled a transition team of more than two dozen people, most of whom are unpaid volunteers, said Matt Shuckerow, a transition team spokesman. Many donated office supplies and equipment.

The money will help pay rent, office supplies and normal transition costs, he said.

“The Bronson transition team has been aware of this issue for some time and is pleased that it is resolved,” said Shuckerow.

Constant said he did not discover the omission in the budget himself, nor did he learn about it from Bronson and his team. Instead, he recently found out about The Alaska Landmine, a website owned and operated by political writer Jeff Landfield.

“I got a call from someone who asked, ‘Hey, is there any money in there?’ And I assumed there was one, ”said Constant.

A new mayor is elected every three to six years. Transitional allowances would not normally be considered by congregation members when approving a budget, assembly member Felix Rivera said.

“As far as I know, it is never something that the congregations think about or worry about. It’s something that the mayor and administration put into the budget when it’s created, ”Rivera said. “When we only recently started looking into it, we found that it wasn’t finished yet.”

Constant said that shortly after the discovery, he then contacted the transition team and asked them if they needed money.

At the time, Bronson’s team told him they hadn’t come forward because they “didn’t want to make a fight out of it,” Constant said.

“Here’s a thought for the future – don’t assume something is a struggle. Ask a question, ”he said. “For me that is the quintessence of everything.”

Bronson during his campaign for mayor positioned himself as a conservative leader who would challenge the city’s progressive assembly and be very critical of its members.

The administration of former mayor Ethan Berkowitz proposed the budget for 2021 in early October 2020 Resignation after scandal about what he called an “inappropriate messaging relationship” with a local newscaster.

The congregation elected incumbent Mayor Austin Quinn-Davidson to fill the office and retained much of Berkowitz’s administration.

A spokesman for the incumbent mayor has not yet responded to email questions about the recent budgeting process and why it did not include money for the transition team.

Greater than cash wanted to repair issues at Division of Veterans Affairs

Seven years of exposed problems in Bay Area VAs

Craig Patrick reports

The Biden government wants to increase the funds for Veterans‘Health care. President Biden is proposing an additional $ 8.5 billion for veterans next year, on top of $ 18 billion to improve VA medical centers in his infrastructure plan.

However, the Department of Veterans Affairs has faced a number of challenges that money alone cannot solve.

One of the most common complaints from veterans is that their services are wrongly denied and they have to wait months of years for their appeal.

For example, a month after being diagnosed with terminal cancer, the VA denied Keith Brown’s claim and after months of back and forth approved his services six days before his death.

MORE: Agent Orange and Cancer: Veteran dies 1 month after VA reversed refusal to perform

Veteran denied cancer benefits until it was too late

Keith was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer in November 2018. A month later, the VA denied compensation for end-stage cancer assistance. Then, in March 2019, the VA denied that his lung cancer was even linked to his ministry after years of exposure to Agent Orange.

“He was annoyed to the extreme,” said Keith’s wife Cindy. “There has to be better, because if you wait long enough and this vet dies, you are under no obligation to make a decision or to repay the payment.”

Last year too Candi Weikert came within six days of losing her home because the VA was delaying the benefits of their survivors until FOX 13 intervened and they immediately approved it with back payment.

MORE: A year and a half later, the widow’s VA benefits finally come through

Widow finally gets VA benefits

When we met Candi Weikert in November, she was a grieving widow who had not been able to receive her VA benefits for more than a year. The bank had already planned to auction their house and they had given up hope of keeping it.

Jon Darling is a former VA insider who said he had insight into why many veteran benefits are delayed or falsely denied.

While Congress passed reforms to alleviate claims backlog, Darling said, based on his experience, policies to improve performance have failed in some cases. He said employees have an allocation of points that they need to achieve and that the points are determined by the number of claims processed statistically. While this seems like a great way to keep the process moving, Darling said in practice, it encouraged some to work too fast and make mistakes and / or increase the number of rejections. He said that a denied claim is considered a completed claim.

“If you reject a claim, you received that one number, nothing was achieved, but you received the number,” he said. “The Regional Office can summarize this as one additional point for a processed application.”

And if the veteran prevails on appeal, Darlins has increased the stats.

“We can get two points from this person,” he said.

He said the staff didn’t automatically deny claims, but he said they weren’t selected for things that disabled veterans – many of them seniors – can easily overlook. And while he said they could call the veterans and fix many of the issues, they were under pressure to limit any call, which prevents workers from calling to fix minor issues on the forms.

“I really had a stomach ache,” he said. “It wasn’t uncommon for people to send in forms for a year and a half. When I called these people, I found my car had already been taken, my house was in foreclosure, and I lost my spouse six months ago, and I am how, and we play around with your papers? “

He encouraged veterans to contact a Veterans Service Representative who can help fill out the forms for free.

“The form is extremely difficult for first-time viewers to complete. Unless they have the assistance of a knowledgeable veteran service representative or someone with experience who sees this form, there is little chance they will fill it out properly . “

The US Department of Veterans has one List of Veterans Service Officers. The National Veterans Foundation also provides a list of resources to assist you https://nvf.org/veteran-service-officers/.

Veteran examiners can also be reached through the Florida Department of Veterans Affairs at 727-319-7440 or by email to VSO@fdva.state.fl.us

For more information, visit https://floridavets.org/benefits-services/.

Airways, Leisure Corporations Simulate Airplane Journeys for Journey Repair

By Jonny Lupsha, Current Events Writer

The pandemic has people around the world feeling nostalgic about air travel. Airlines and entertainment companies are already offering alternatives to real travel for those who miss flying. Airplane seating is a game of incentives and asymmetry.

Airline seats in coaches are usually placed close together and share an armrest between two seats. Photo by Atstock Productions / Shutterstock

Although few people enjoy going through airport security, many people have longed for packed bags, airplanes soaring high in the sky, and other air travel experiences during the pandemic. In recent years, and especially since the COVID-19 outbreak, airlines and entertainment companies have started offering alternatives.

Many airlines from Australia to Singapore offer “nowhere flights”. Travelers board flights that take off, fly for several hours and land at the same airport. Other companies offer on-site dining experiences that simulate airplane cabins with rows of seats in rows and in-flight meals. A Boeing 777 docked at Tokyo Haneda Airport sells tickets to get into a prime seat, relax, and get full meal service for up to 59,800 yen (or $ 550).

Typically, the balance between prime seating and coach seating on commercial flights is an economic game about how much money people spend on accommodation. In his video series Understanding Economics: Game Theory, Dr. Jay R. Corrigan, Professor of Economics at Kenyon College, said the nature of this game is asymmetric information.

Dear Sir or Madam, who are in the coach

Dr. Corrigan said that understand the balance between first class and coachImagine there are only two cabins, and just like in real life, they both reach their destination at the same time, while First Class enjoys free drinks, more legroom, and more attention from flight attendants.

Also, imagine there are only two strict types of travelers: business and leisure. The biggest difference in this example is that business travelers don’t pay for their own tickets. They are paid by the companies that employ them.

“Let’s say a business traveler is willing to pay $ 2,000 for a first class seat and $ 1,000 for a coach seat, where alpha is a coefficient between zero and one that indicates how comfortable things are are in the coach cabin. ” Said Dr. Corrigan. “When alpha is one, the flight trainer is very comfortable, almost as beautiful as flying in first class, but when alpha is zero, the flight trainer is an excruciating ordeal.”

Now imagine if a vacation traveler paying for their own ticket was willing to pay $ 600 for a first class ticket and $ 500 alpha for a seat on the bus. When a flight from New York to Los Angeles costs $ 1,600 in first class and $ 300 in a coach, an airline wants to fill its plane with first class passengers and seats, but not enough travelers are paying. Instead, most travelers fly by bus. What does an airline do? It is an incentive for top class and makes the trainer less attractive.

A packet of peanuts to relieve the pain

“While you don’t control the ticket prices [as an airline employee]One thing you control is alpha, ”said Dr. Corrigan. “You can lower the alpha by installing less comfortable seats on the coach, moving those seats closer together, serving less appetizing snacks, reducing the in-flight entertainment options, and so on.”

This is where asymmetrical information comes into play. Travelers know how much they are paying for a ticket, but an airline doesn’t. According to Dr. Corrigan’s task for the airline is to select an alpha value that creates a “balance of separation” that forces business travelers to reveal their high willingness to pay by buying first-class tickets and, for holidaymakers, their low willingness to pay by buying bus tickets.

In other words, an airline can change their services and accommodations in each cabin to get the hypothetical business traveler to travel first class and the leisure traveler who wants to fly the bus. However, if the bus is too nice, business travelers won’t pay for top-notch services. How beautiful can a bus be before a business traveler simply flies a bus instead of paying for top notch?

“Replace what we assumed about willingness to pay and prices [for first-class]That means that 2,000 minus 1,600 must be more than 1,000 times alpha minus 300, ”said Dr. Corrigan. “When we rearrange ourselves to look for alpha, we must find that alpha must be less than 0.7.”

Similar equations follow for balancing the accommodations and restrictions for both cabins. Dr. Corrigan concluded that the goal is to find out which values ​​for Alpha offer a “nice, decent separation balance” to keep both cabins relatively full. Just as bus cabins that are too beautiful induce business travelers to simply fly buses, bus cabins that are too miserable result in passengers not at all willing to fly buses but not being able to afford top quality, which is empty planes and means enormous losses.

Edited by Angela Shoemaker, The Great Courses Daily

Spring Hope officers say they don’t have the cash to repair street riddled with potholes

SPRING HOPE, NC (WNCN) – A driver reached out to CBS 17 in hopes of getting answers on a road driving him crazy.

Steven McArthur sent photos of N. Walnut Street near the pothole streets Nash and Franklin.

He says it’s been like this for years and he wants the city to appear on the streets again.

“There’s a big problem with sinking pavement and new potholes that are so big that you have to drive all over the street to avoid them. Mix that with cars parked on the side of the road and it could lead to disaster for motorists, ”said Steven McArthur, a Spring Hope resident.

He said the issue had been brought to the council meeting several times but nothing would be done.

“The last excuse we heard was that this was a private road, but I’m not sure how they justify it,” McArthur said.

  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • Pothole (Photo: Steven McArthur)
  • A view of the street from above

After accomplishing nothing, he reached out to Laura Smith at CBS 17 for answers.

Spring Hope city manager Jae Kim admitted that the road needs to be paved again, but the city does not have the means to do so.

“A full repair is required, but we don’t currently have the funds on our Powell bill to fix it. However, in our future road improvement plan, it is high on the list, ”said Kim.

In the short term, the city said the crews will be working on several potholes in the city, including the one on N. Walnut Street.

“We are waiting to be added to your schedule shortly,” said Kim.

CBS 17 will stay abreast of this story and provide updates as new information enters the newsroom.

If you have something that is driving you crazy on the streets, email Laura Smith at LSmith@CBS17.com.

A number of Alexandria Metropolis Council members mentioned cash ought to be in upcoming finances to repair drainage

ALEXANDRIA, La. (KALB) – On Tuesday, Alexandria City Council concluded its second of two special committee meetings to discuss the proposed operating and capital budget for fiscal year 2021-2022.

During the first meeting on March 30thThe council focused on allocating more money to the Alexandria Police Department. They discussed taking funds from other areas and using them to hire more civil servants and allow them to raise their salaries

At the second meeting of the special committee, councilors said again that the money in the budget should be used in other areas. Funds were allocated in the submitted budget for repairs to the town hall, but councilors Cynthia Perry and Catherine Davidson said the funds must be used to support flood problems in the city.

“We know where these areas are, if a little rain falls, houses will flood. We need to fix these problems. We have to act and do something instead of just talking about it. “

Both said flooding was a major problem in District 2 and District 3, particularly in the Martin Park and Deerfield parishes. Homes in these areas have been supplied with water and there have been problems with backwater flooding during last year’s hurricanes. Councilor Perry said she saw nothing in the budget to fix the drainage problems and that is what she is working towards.

“I told my constituents that this would be my main problem and I will fight for it,” said Perry. “Nobody has walked through the water like me. To see these people’s homes for what they were, I just want some money on this budget. “

The city council talked about doing a city-wide study of ways to repair drainage as long as it didn’t take months for those results to become available again.

A public hearing will take place at the next Council meeting on April 20th before the vote on the adoption of the budget for the coming financial year.

Click here report a typo.

Copyright 2021 CALF. All rights reserved.