Couple jazzes up speakeasy-style Westside nightclub | Options

Stepping past the velvet curtain and into Westside Blues and Jazz is like stepping back in time to visit an authentic toe-tapping, head-nodding, speakeasy-style nightclub from the Roaring ’20s. 

With its live music, plush couches, moody lighting, antique fixtures, swivel stools, fully stocked bar and even an LED sign buzzing above the stage, Westside Blues and Jazz is an escape from the normal day to day and an experience unlike anywhere else in the Valley.

 

A tough start

“It’s been on my bucket list for 25 years,” said Paul Vincent Perez, owner of the nightclub. “So, when I retired in 2019, I was just driving around with nothing to do and I thought, ‘You know what, I’m going to open up a little blues and jazz club.’”

And he did. Having dreamt about the club for 25 years, Perez already had a clear vision of what he wanted. With his partner and co-founder Cindi Jackson at his side, Perez said he thought, “Well, we’ll figure it out,” even though this was the first time either of them had opened a nightclub. Once he decided to go for it, Perez rented and renovated a building and was ready to open less than a year later, in April 2020.

Of course, when the club was ready to open, the world was shutting down due to the pandemic. At first, they, like many, just pushed the dates back, but it soon became apparent that this would last longer. 

Westside Blues and Jazz was temporarily shuttered. Worse, because the club had not officially opened, did not have employees yet and Perez had no previous proof of income since his retirement, “we got zilch,” according to Perez. They paid rent for an empty building for a year with zero income or relief money.

Their break came April 9, when they opened with limited seating, plastic shields, temperature checks and masks. It wasn’t what they expected, but it was a start. Music fans were eager to see bands perform again. The club opened at full capacity July 1, after state restrictions were lifted, and finally had its official grand opening July 8.

“It’s been great. Just about every night we’re sold out,” Perez said. “We’re just getting to the point on a nightly basis of breaking even. We’re just starting to make a few bucks. But to make up for the year? No, that will take a while. That’s kind of where we’re at right now. But I’d be happy if I break even for the rest of my life in this business. I’m a happy guy. I’m not really in it for the money. I’m in it for the music, and this is my retirement.”

 

Prioritizing the music

While it was Perez’s idea to open the club, Jackson is just as much of a jazz lover, even a bit of an expert. She grew up immersed in jazz and wanted others to fall in love with it, too.

“Jazz is in my blood,” Jackson said. “As the niece of Arizona saxophonist Lou Garno, I was empowered to open a jazz club that celebrates and honors the history of blues and jazz. We also opened Westside Blues and Jazz out of necessity; we knew there weren’t any full-service blues and jazz clubs in the Valley that offered live music in a traditional lounge setting. We wanted to change that.”

Westside Blues and Jazz is the first live music lounge to open in the West Valley. True to the duo’s goal, the space looks like an authentic, basement speakeasy lounge. The servers even wear flapper dresses to tie together the vintage theme.

While the style may have a throwback look, the club has a professional, updated sound and lighting system to give the audience the best experience possible. Quality is important to the couple. It’s what sets them apart.

“I could get local bands (for cheap) where I could be making money right now, but I didn’t open it up just to sit in the corner and have a beer and listen to music. I can go to any local bar and do that,” Perez said. “The success to this type of business is the quality of music. You keep the quality, they will come. I will not sacrifice that for money or anything. I’ll close before I turn it into (an average bar) or I’ll get up there and sing karaoke.”

The couple said it’s important to stick with jazz and blues. Perez said part of their mission is to revive jazz and bring it back into the community, as clubs similar to Westside have fizzled out over the years. More than just a creative sound, jazz often has a deeper meaning, Jackson added, and many songs deal with issues still prevalent.

For now, all the club’s bands are local artists, many of whom have not had a space to perform live in over a year. The gigs at Westside Blues and Jazz are critical to some of these artists, while just plain fun for others. As the club draws in more revenue, Perez said they will be hiring quality musicians from all over.

 

Something for everyone

The club’s crowd is a mix of ages, races and personalities, with something for everyone.

“We’re finding jazz is more of the older crowd, it seems like, but our jazz that we have here, it’s not like people conceive,” Perez said.

“If they haven’t heard jazz, they think of that elevator music and stuff like that, but our bands are top-of-the-line rhythm and blues mix.

“Blues is a little younger crowd, under 40s, I would say. Then you’ve got the over-65 crowd who were around from my generation, who remember all those great blues bars (that used to be) here. There’s a mix. That’s why we try and diversify a little on the music, like throwing in a little R&B, but we don’t want to get away from the foundation of the blues and jazz.”

For those really feeling the music, Perez emphasizes that it’s a nightclub, so guests are free to celebrate the music.

“Certain nights, they’ll be screaming and shouting. It’s a rowdy nightclub,” Perez said. “People chitchat and socialize. It’s not a concert hall. People can get up and dance in any open spots they want. We encourage that.”

And not everyone has to come for the music. Westside Blues and Jazz has an outdoor seating area for those who want to hear the music in the background while they enjoy a beverage, from a myriad of signature cocktails, wines and beer, along with classic bar food like a soft pretzel, fries and even a grilled cheese. There is also bar seating, where patrons get more of the music than outside but can still sit back and chat. Perez said he wanted the space to be comfortable for everyone.

“We have people dress up, like couples who come in on a date,” Perez said. “But no one feels uncomfortable sitting next to a guy in shorts and sneakers. If they wanted to dress up, they could go to Scottsdale, but we want you to be comfortable. We want you to enjoy your time here, sit back, relax, have some drinks, dance, whatever.”   

By Allison Brown

Glendale Star Staff Writer

Stepping past the velvet curtain and into Westside Blues and Jazz is like stepping back in time to visit an authentic toe-tapping, head-nodding, speakeasy-style nightclub from the Roaring ’20s. 

With its live music, plush couches, moody lighting, antique fixtures, swivel stools, fully stocked bar and even an LED sign buzzing above the stage, Westside Blues and Jazz is an escape from the normal day to day and an experience unlike anywhere else in the Valley.

 

A tough start

“It’s been on my bucket list for 25 years,” said Paul Vincent Perez, owner of the nightclub. “So, when I retired in 2019, I was just driving around with nothing to do and I thought, ‘You know what, I’m going to open up a little blues and jazz club.’”

And he did. Having dreamt about the club for 25 years, Perez already had a clear vision of what he wanted. With his partner and co-founder Cindi Jackson at his side, Perez said he thought, “Well, we’ll figure it out,” even though this was the first time either of them had opened a nightclub. Once he decided to go for it, Perez rented and renovated a building and was ready to open less than a year later, in April 2020.

Of course, when the club was ready to open, the world was shutting down due to the pandemic. At first, they, like many, just pushed the dates back, but it soon became apparent that this would last longer. 

Westside Blues and Jazz was temporarily shuttered. Worse, because the club had not officially opened, did not have employees yet and Perez had no previous proof of income since his retirement, “we got zilch,” according to Perez. They paid rent for an empty building for a year with zero income or relief money.

Their break came April 9, when they opened with limited seating, plastic shields, temperature checks and masks. It wasn’t what they expected, but it was a start. Music fans were eager to see bands perform again. The club opened at full capacity July 1, after state restrictions were lifted, and finally had its official grand opening July 8.

“It’s been great. Just about every night we’re sold out,” Perez said. “We’re just getting to the point on a nightly basis of breaking even. We’re just starting to make a few bucks. But to make up for the year? No, that will take a while. That’s kind of where we’re at right now. But I’d be happy if I break even for the rest of my life in this business. I’m a happy guy. I’m not really in it for the money. I’m in it for the music, and this is my retirement.”

 

Prioritizing the music

While it was Perez’s idea to open the club, Jackson is just as much of a jazz lover, even a bit of an expert. She grew up immersed in jazz and wanted others to fall in love with it, too.

“Jazz is in my blood,” Jackson said. “As the niece of Arizona saxophonist Lou Garno, I was empowered to open a jazz club that celebrates and honors the history of blues and jazz. We also opened Westside Blues and Jazz out of necessity; we knew there weren’t any full-service blues and jazz clubs in the Valley that offered live music in a traditional lounge setting. We wanted to change that.”

Westside Blues and Jazz is the first live music lounge to open in the West Valley. True to the duo’s goal, the space looks like an authentic, basement speakeasy lounge. The servers even wear flapper dresses to tie together the vintage theme.

While the style may have a throwback look, the club has a professional, updated sound and lighting system to give the audience the best experience possible. Quality is important to the couple. It’s what sets them apart.

“I could get local bands (for cheap) where I could be making money right now, but I didn’t open it up just to sit in the corner and have a beer and listen to music. I can go to any local bar and do that,” Perez said. “The success to this type of business is the quality of music. You keep the quality, they will come. I will not sacrifice that for money or anything. I’ll close before I turn it into (an average bar) or I’ll get up there and sing karaoke.”

The couple said it’s important to stick with jazz and blues. Perez said part of their mission is to revive jazz and bring it back into the community, as clubs similar to Westside have fizzled out over the years. More than just a creative sound, jazz often has a deeper meaning, Jackson added, and many songs deal with issues still prevalent.

For now, all the club’s bands are local artists, many of whom have not had a space to perform live in over a year. The gigs at Westside Blues and Jazz are critical to some of these artists, while just plain fun for others. As the club draws in more revenue, Perez said they will be hiring quality musicians from all over.

 

Something for everyone

The club’s crowd is a mix of ages, races and personalities, with something for everyone.

“We’re finding jazz is more of the older crowd, it seems like, but our jazz that we have here, it’s not like people conceive,” Perez said.

“If they haven’t heard jazz, they think of that elevator music and stuff like that, but our bands are top-of-the-line rhythm and blues mix.

“Blues is a little younger crowd, under 40s, I would say. Then you’ve got the over-65 crowd who were around from my generation, who remember all those great blues bars (that used to be) here. There’s a mix. That’s why we try and diversify a little on the music, like throwing in a little R&B, but we don’t want to get away from the foundation of the blues and jazz.”

For those really feeling the music, Perez emphasizes that it’s a nightclub, so guests are free to celebrate the music.

“Certain nights, they’ll be screaming and shouting. It’s a rowdy nightclub,” Perez said. “People chitchat and socialize. It’s not a concert hall. People can get up and dance in any open spots they want. We encourage that.”

And not everyone has to come for the music. Westside Blues and Jazz has an outdoor seating area for those who want to hear the music in the background while they enjoy a beverage, from a myriad of signature cocktails, wines and beer, along with classic bar food like a soft pretzel, fries and even a grilled cheese. There is also bar seating, where patrons get more of the music than outside but can still sit back and chat. Perez said he wanted the space to be comfortable for everyone.

“We have people dress up, like couples who come in on a date,” Perez said. “But no one feels uncomfortable sitting next to a guy in shorts and sneakers. If they wanted to dress up, they could go to Scottsdale, but we want you to be comfortable. We want you to enjoy your time here, sit back, relax, have some drinks, dance, whatever.”   

Navigating a pandemic, museum-style | Neighborhood Options

Elasticity. This is the first word that comes to mind in the last 16 months when I think of the University of Alaska Museum of the North (UAMN). During its nearly centenary, UAMN has faced many challenges, but the Covid-19 pandemic was a storm for the record books. Like our parent organization, the University of Alaska, our staff and supporters everywhere have recognized the importance of serving our expanded community of stakeholders, especially during this global crisis.

Like most US museums, the pandemic has had a profound impact on our operations on many levels. To begin with, we reluctantly closed our doors to the public on March 13, 2020 and closed our physical exhibits for several months. Instructor-led K-12 tours of our galleries, which usually thrived in the spring season, came to an abrupt halt when distance learning became the norm. And students, lecturers and visiting scholars who had planned study and scientific work in our collections did not have access to the largest individual holdings of cultural and natural history collections in the country.

Although it was necessary, we were sad to close our public galleries. When we finally reopened in July 2020, the number of visitors was only 5% of the 2019 figures. This had significant consequences for our financial results. As government funding for the university continues to decline, the UAMN has increasingly relied on admissions and store sales for our bread and butter. In a normal year, visitor income is nearly 50 percent of our total annual income (followed by grants and then government dollars). Hence, the almost lack of tourism in 2020 led to an extreme belt buckle.

In the face of financial uncertainty, largely teleworking staff, and ever evolving plans to contain Covid that restricted access to buildings, the museum faced a critical threat to fulfill its core mission of collecting, preserving Alaska’s cultural and natural history to study, teach and exhibit. As a state and federal archive, many agencies also rely on UAMN to house public collections as we have the facilities and expertise to care for Alaska’s treasures. The fact that we did not wait idly for better times shows the commitment and dedication of our employees. Rather, we have recognized the urgency to continue serving our large community of stakeholders, especially during these troubled times. We also took this unforeseen opportunity to adapt and diversify.

On the surface, shutting down a museum’s operations may seem trivial, especially our research collections, which take up much of the museum’s lower level. In reality, the collections are a dynamic, lively, constantly changing unit. Similar to a centuries-old wooden sailing ship, you have to constantly repair the sails, tar the rigging and pump the holds. Failure to do the thousands of tasks puts the entire ship at risk. Likewise, UAMN’s diverse holdings, which include over 2.5 million art and artifacts, plant and animal specimens, and my personal favorites – fossils, need to be cleaned, preserved, repositioned, monitored, loan processing and databases created. It’s a never-ending task. Our collections also include one of the largest frozen tissue samples in the country, stored in liquid nitrogen cryovates and used by researchers around the world to track genetic changes, diseases and environmental pollutants in plants and animals. Simply put, simply turning off the lights and coming back a year later is never an option.

We also strived to better serve our visitors, who number up to 90,000 in a year without a pandemic. Most importantly, UAMN can now proudly boast the only articulated and suspended bowhead whale skeleton in North America. The bowhead whale is an iconic species of the Arctic, and our specimen, harvested by Iñupiaq whalers in Utqiagvik in 1963, shows the tightly woven fabric that is both cultural and natural. The project was financed at the end of 2019 through a generous gift from the Bill Ströcker Foundation. When the Covid-19 clouds began to gather in early 2020, we decided not to throw this project off track with the pandemic. Indeed, the bowhead whale has become a symbol of our collective desire and perseverance to make the most of a bad situation. Assembling the skeleton and producing a new special exhibition, Perspective: Ways to See a Whale, provided much-needed inspiration during the 16 month process and brought together the talents of many different museum and university employees who are committed to completing this world used. Show class.

Knowing that many families could not come to our exhibits for over a year, we invested a lot of energy in putting our exhibits online to share at home. We have expanded our virtual museum (www.uaf.edu/museum/virtualmuseum) to include additional exhibits and collections, video podcasts, as well as activities and lesson plans. Via our immersive app (free to download) you can now also enjoy an interactive 3D replica of our exhibition “ShAKe: Earthquakes in Interior Alaska”. In autumn 2020 we acquired the internationally known bus 142 (“Into the Wild Bus”) and are in the process of preparing it for a later exhibition for a free outdoor exhibition. We even moved our museum shop to a wonderful new space and we now have many products online.

Our education and public programs team continued to deliver creative new ways, such as virtual versions of our popular family programs. They also created and distributed almost 1,000 educational packages for families so that they can get to know our museum collections in a hands-on way at home. Museum curators and collection managers also developed a new college-level museum studies curriculum and taught the first courses online at the UAF in the final academic year.

I am very proud of our curators, staff and students who made this work possible. What really sustained us is the deep commitment of our employees to preserve and share our Alaskan heritage. The support of our university and the trust of our sponsors are just as important. The pandemic is not over yet, but UAMN will continue to hold our shared history, conduct research and share knowledge through world-class exhibits and public relations.

Patrick Druckermiller is the director of the Museum of the North at the University of Alaska. For more information on the museum’s programs and events, see www.uaf.edu/museum or call 474-7505.

Patrick Druckermiller is the director of the Museum of the North at the University of Alaska. For more information on the museum’s programs and events, see www.uaf.edu/museum or call 474-7505.

Zurdo Ramirez Now Options Aggressive Type, Sullivan Barrera Can Attest

LOS ANGELES, CA (July 9, 2021) – Mexican warrior Gilberto “Zurdo” Ramirez (42-0, 28 KOs) scored a fourth-round knockout win in his Golden Boy against Cuban challenger Sullivan Barrera (22-4 , 14 KOs). Debut at Banc of California Stadium in a spectacular fight broadcast live on DAZN. Zurdo ended the matter at 1:38 am of the above round.

“I think my performance is great,” said Zurdo Ramirez. “I trained for the body shot. And I think it was beautiful. At 175 pounds everyone saw a better Zurdo Ramirez. This is my department. I will take the souls of all champions in the 175 pound division. “

Joseph Diaz Jr. (32-1-1, 15 KOs) from South El Monte, California won the WBC Interim Lightweight World Championship by defeating Dominican ex-two-division world champion Javier Fortuna (36-3-1, 25 KOs) unanimously defeated decision in the co-main event.

“Javier Fortuna was a warrior,” said Joseph Diaz Jr. “I thought I’d easily get body shots, but he’s a skilled defensive fighter. He is very talented. I wish him all the best and hope he continues. When I saw the cut, I was hoping it wasn’t as bad as fighting Tevin Farmer. It wasn’t, so from then on I just dictated the pace. I can fight all the big names, Ryan Garcia or Tevin Farmer. “

Seniesa Estrada (21-0, 8 KOs) of East Los Angeles, California won the WBO world light flyweight title by a 10-round unanimous win over Japanese warrior Tenkai Tsunami (28-13-1, 16 KOs).

William Zepeda (23-0, 21 KOs) of San Mateo Atenco scored an extra win over Hector Tanajara (19-1, 5 KOs) of San Antonio, Texas in a scheduled 10-round lightweight fight. Zepeda punished Tanajara for several rounds, forcing Tanajara’s corner to end the fight after the sixth round.

Naoko Fujioka (19-2-1, 7 KOs) of Tokyo, Japan defended her WBA flyweight championship by taking a 10-round majority win over Mexican challenger Sulem Urbina (12-2, 2 KOs). One judge scored a tie of 95-95, which was surpassed by 99-91 and 96-94.

Lamont Roach Jr. (21-1-1, 8 KOs) of Washington, DC scored a second-round knockout win in the second round against Daniel Rosas (21-4-1, 13 KOs) of Mexico City, Mexico in a planned 10-round super featherweight battle.

Armenian challenger Azat Hovhannisyan (20-3, 16 KOs) scored a unanimous 10-round win over Jose Gonzalez (23-9-1, 13 KOs) from Guadalajara, Mexico. Hovhannisyan won 100-90, 99-91 and 99-91.

Mihai Nistor (3-0, 3 KOs) from Bucharest, Romania, scored a round of 16 victory against Colby Madison (9-3-2.6 KOs) from Baltimore, Maryland in an eight-round heavyweight fight.

Starling Castillo (15-0, 12 KOs) from San Cristobal, Dominican Republic, scored a knockout win in the second round against

Miguel Contreras (11-0, 6 KOs) from Bakersfield, California in a scheduled eight-round super lightweight fight. Gregory Morales (13-0, 8 KOs) of San Antonio, Texas scored a unanimous win over Rodrigo Guerrero (26-12-2, 16 KOs) of Mexico City, Mexico in an eight-round featherweight bout. Morales won with 59-55 points.

Miguel Gaona (1-0) made his professional debut by defeating Gilberto Aguilar (0-2) of Mexico City, Mexico, by unanimous decision in four rounds of lightweight action. Gaona won by three scores of 39-37. Zurdo vs. Barrera was a 12-round special light heavyweight attraction presented by Golden Boy in collaboration with Zurdo Promotions.

Diaz Jr. vs. Fortuna was a 12-round bout for the vacant WBC Interim Lightweight Championship presented by Golden Boy in association with Sampson Boxing. The event was sponsored by Hennessy “Never Stop. Never Settle ”and“ BetOnline – your experts for online sports betting ”. The fight took place on Friday, July 9th, at the Banc of California Stadium in downtown Los Angeles and was broadcast live on DAZN.

Historic Council Grove Washunga Days options elite nation music leisure

Frank J. Buchmann
From June 18 to 19, Washunga Days will be entertaining young and old in historic Council Grove on the old Santa Fe Trail.
“The annual festival celebrates both past and present cultures in Council Grove and Morris Counties,” says Daedranite.
“This is a festival for the Kaw Indians, community and family,” said Knight on behalf of the Washunga Days Story Media Company.
Top musicals entertain you all day Friday evening and Saturday. “There’s KawNationPowwow, flea markets, parades, car shows, kids games, food stalls, and more,” says Knight.
Activities are planned for Neoshaw Riverwalk Park along Main Street, the high school parking lot, and throughout the area.
“You can visit more than 12 Council Grove historic sites like the Washunga Days schedule wasn’t enough,” Knight said. “In addition, all joint ventures will be opened with many special and unique services.
“We’re delighted that Farmers & Drawbar Bank sponsored Washunga Days and added three dozen donors,” Knight admitted.
Read the headlines for the South Hole Band and Shane Smith & Saints on Friday and Saturday at 10:00 PM, respectively.
Ian Munsick is an additional musical feature with performances starting at 7.30pm on Fridays and Saturdays.
The Read Southall Band was formed when four like-minded Oklahomans from different backgrounds just wanted to make music. In 2018 we released “Borrowed Time” with “Don’t Tell Me” and “Why”. It has made it to the top 10 on multiple streaming charts.
Shane Smith & The Saints is a five-person Texas tour group that operates in 40 states and three continents. Shane Smith & The Saints have released three albums in their 10 year career and are looking forward to their next album “Hail Mary”.
Ian Mansick brings the air of Rocky Mountain to the music of Nashville and pioneered a new nation. A Wyoming born singer-songwriter training was a combination of working on a ranch and working in a crowd. With a successful personal release, Munsick signed a major label deal with Warner Music Nashville.
Additional Friday entertainment includes the Lazy Wayne Band (5:30 am) and Savannah Chestnut (7:30 am). Saturday’s bonus roster includes Box Turtles at 11:30 a.m. Graceful Grain, 1:30; Derek Calvin & The All Nighters, 3:30 am; and block car, 5:30.
The Kaw Nation Washunga Days Powwow will be held on both Friday and Saturday in Alegawaho Park south of Council Grove. Arbor, used for dances and ceremonies, is a sacred place that is blessed by spiritual guides. All powwow dancers, with the exception of young children, will wear full regalia. There is no entry fee to participate in any of the Kaw activities.
This year’s Washunga Days Flea Market, hosted by the Council Grove Disc Golf Club, is taking place at Council Grove High School. On Fridays and Saturdays there will only be an outdoor stand from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
The auto show is scheduled for Saturday from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. All entries were greeted with the first 75 entries of the Dash badge and goody bag. Door prizes are awarded every hour with special prizes for the best vehicles on display.
This year’s Washunga Days Parade will take place on the main street on Saturday morning at 10 a.m. All participants are welcomed with the pre-approval required to be eligible to win. The Grand Marshal are Bob and Christia Alexander, and Jolly Ziegler is the Junior Grand Marshal.
Special children’s activities such as rubber dinghy and drum safaris, face painting and climbing are planned for Saturday.
CG Stars & Stripes Fireworks will once again light up the skies over the Neo Show Riverwalk on Saturday evening. The choreographed music that accompanies the 20-minute show promises to make it unforgettable.
Grocery vendors will return to Neoshaw Riverwalk Park from 4:00 p.m. on Friday night and 11:00 a.m. on Saturday.
Bracelets can be purchased from the County Globe / Mori County Chamber of Commerce office and can attend Washunga Days on both days.
More information is available at www.washungadays.com.

Held in Council Grove June 18-19, many of Washungaday’s activities take place in the elaborately developed Neoshaw Riverwalk Park.

Read Southall Band will star all of Washunga Days entertainment at Council Grove June 18-19.


Kaw Nation Washunga Days Powwow takes place Friday and Saturday 18-19. June, in Alegawaho Park south of Council Grove. Arbor, where dances and rituals take place, is a sacred place that is blessed by spiritual guides. Farmers & Drawers Bank, which has operated in Council Grove and Morris Counties for over a century, sponsors Washunga Days. The bank building, built in 1892, is an example of eclectic architecture with brick and stone masonry, arches and domes. In 1981 the bank was expanded to include an adjoining display building from 1902.

Gala fundraiser options leisure, native cooks’ cooking | Native Information Tales

New Iberia won’t see its annual Spanish festival this year, but followers of the region’s rich Spanish heritage got the chance to celebrate Saturday at the Spanish gala hosted by La Asociación Española de Nueva Iberia.

The gala, which is the club and festival’s main fundraiser for the events they host throughout the year, was held at the Sliman Theater and was full of local supporters, cooks and visiting kings.

“It was good, very busy,” said Association Vice President Brinkley Lopez at the event. “We had less than a couple of months to organize this so it was very interesting.”

The gala included a live and silent auction, seafood from local chefs, and musical entertainment. Usually the gala includes flamenco dancers entertaining the audience for the fundraiser, but due to COVID-19 and travel restrictions, Lopez said it was not feasible this year.

“We had a little challenge to find entertainment this year,” she said. “We usually have flamenco dancers, but because of COVID and travel, that couldn’t happen.

Instead, Lopez said the club invited New Iberia singer Keely Brennan to perform.

“We have Keely who we’re really looking forward to. She just recorded her first single and we are happy to have it, ”she said.

The Asociación Española de Nueva Iberia is a New Iberia organization established to preserve New Iberia’s Spanish heritage. She is also responsible for running the Spanish Festival of New Iberia or the El Festival Español de Nueva Iberia.

Instead of the usual focus on the region’s French heritage, the festival celebrates the creation of New Iberia families who were actually of Spanish ancestry. Genealogy workshops and other research aids are held for each festival.

The festival has also helped build a relationship between New Iberia and its twin town, Alhaurin de la Torre. Dignitaries and even the mayor come to New Iberia regularly each year to attend the festival.

However, the association made the decision to postpone the event this year, mainly due to a desire to host the New Iberia Spanish Festival in April 2022.

“We wanted it in the fall, but we decided not to have it in the fall,” said Lopez. “We want to continue with Aprilfest in 2022 and we didn’t want to do it one after the other.”

There were also some changes in the structure of the club. Ebrar Reaux, the association’s longtime president, said he would resign so James Migues could take responsibility for the role and Lopez would serve as president.

Owensboro’s downtown will probably be alive with leisure this weekend | Options

With an increased vaccination rollout and pleasant weather on the horizon, Owensboro’s entertainment scene is awakening after a year of doors closed due to the pandemic, and several events are happening this weekend for families to enjoy.

Most venues are returning for the first time since 2019, like Kentucky Fried Pickin ‘, which started Thursday and will last through Saturday. According to promoter and Kings Highway mandolin player Mark Hargis, some musicians play almost non-stop.

Weekend parties are free, although many musicians check in at the hotel. They open their doors and invite others to join jam sessions, which sometimes last until 4:30 a.m., he said.

Outside in the courtyard behind the hotel, a stage will be set up to allow safe play and physical distancing. Bands will be performing throughout the weekend and everyone is welcome to stroll from the riverside to watch the festivities.

“Hopefully this will ease things up and get the COVID over with,” said Hargis.

Kristy Whiteside, another organizer of the event, said there will also be a hat contest on Saturday and everyone who enters should bring their best hat.

You can find more information about this event on the Facebook page @ Kentucky-Fried-Pickin ‘.

Mamma Mia!

The RiverPark Center is a venue that has been successfully hosting events throughout the pandemic, with some mandatory closings and cancellations due to high COVID-19 numbers. One thing the venue, along with many others around the world, had to deal with has been the cancellation and postponement of major shows touring the country, such as those on its Broadway series, and musical performances. Since such productions are not coming, the centre’s officials put their heads together and find safe alternatives, such as the interactive show series.

Interactive shows allow the audience to participate while watching. Those that have been and will be performed at RiverPark are based on films. While the film is shown on a big screen on the Cannon Hall stage, a “shadow cast” plays out iconic moments from the film.

Grae Greer, RPC director of marketing and education, said the shows that have taken place so far have been a success, and she expects the same for the show, which airs “Mamma Mia!” On Friday April 30th.

Guests will be given a bag of items to be used during the show, as well as a drinking game sheet if they wish to participate.

“This will be the 11th interactive film of 2021,” said Greer. “We had a lot of fun creating it, and I hope the audience loved it as much as we did. I think we have created a new target group base for the RiverPark Center. These experiences bring something new to the RPC; something completely different from what has been presented in the past. “

“Mamma Mia!” The starting gun will be given at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $ 12 each and can be purchased at the RiverPark box office or at riverparkcenter.org.

Lip sync battle

Puzzle Pieces will have its annual Lip Sync Battle on Saturday, but it will be presented differently this year for safe viewing.

Ashley Wedding, PR director of Puzzle Pieces, said the event will not be open to the public this year and virtual tickets will be available for visitors to watch from home.

Virtual tickets can be purchased on Owensboro’s Lip Sync Battle Facebook page, where an Eventbrite link is available.

Cruise-in downtown

Owensboro’s vintage downtown cruise-in takes place on Saturday, with all makes and models from MOPAR showcasing.

Steve McNatton, spokesman for Cruise-In, said the past year has been very tough, but Sunset Cruisers are hoping to get all seven of their events from April through October this year.

The vintage and some newer vehicles line Second Street and the back streets between Daviess and Frederica Streets during the event, which starts at 4pm. It is open to the public and the restaurants in the city center are open to visitors.

Cork & kitchen

The Owensboro Convention Center is hosting a Cinco de Mayo-themed Cork & Cuisine on Sunday from 6pm to 8pm

Chad Benefield will be the guest host while guests enjoy a five-course meal of Mexican-inspired dishes paired with wines and spirits.

Tickets for this event are $ 62.25 per person or two for $ 115. All tickets include wine and spirits and are available at owensborocenter.com.

What leisure does Gen Z favor? The reply is not good for Hollywood | Options

As a parent, when you gather your teenagers in the living room to watch “The Falcon and the Winter Soldier” on Disney +, you just know there’s a good chance they’d rather play Fortnite.

This is the result of a new study by the consulting firm Deloitte, in which the generational differences in entertainment at home were analyzed.

The study, based on an online survey of more than 2,000 consumers in February, showed that preferences between millennials and the younger generation are changing rapidly when it comes to how they want to spend their free time.

For Gen Z, defined as those born between 1997 and 2007, video – whether it be movies or TV shows – is not a priority, the study found.

26 percent of Gen Zers in the survey said playing video games was their favorite entertainment activity, compared with 14 percent for listening to music, 12 percent for browsing the web, and 11 percent for engaging in social media. Only 10% said they would rather see a movie or TV show at home.

Compared to Millennials (born 1983-1996), 18% of whom chose movies and TV shows as their preferred type of entertainment. Video games were the entertainment option of choice for 16% of millennials.

If these trends continue, it could mean that videos are becoming less important to consumers, said Jana Arbanas, vice chairman and US director of telecommunications, media and entertainment at Deloitte. Interactive online games are playing an increasingly important role in how people interact, especially for younger consumers.

“Gen Z would much rather spend time playing games, music, or social media,” she said. “That was a really stark contrast that we saw in terms of the change and long-term impact of Gen Z on this industrial sector.”

This could be an issue for Hollywood, which is already seeing stiff competition from video games (including cell phone and console games) and social media apps like TikTok and Snapchat. Teenagers and young adults are important so that studios and networks can observe them, especially as they carry their behavior into adulthood.

If executives and producers hope that teenagers and young adults will grow beyond these behaviors and become more like their parents over time, the Deloitte researchers said it isn’t likely.

“Millennials have adopted the behaviors they developed as teenagers and they continued into the early 30s. So if Gen Z is something like that, their behaviors can change slightly, but I don’t see full aging in their behaviors behaviors, ”said Kevin Westcott, US technology, media and telecommunications leader.

Deloitte’s survey also looked at issues such as churn in the growing streaming services market. As streamers like Disney +, HBO Max, and Netflix compete for viewer attention, companies also have to struggle to keep consumers who sign up.

According to the Deloitte study, subscriptions switched more than a year ago as more streaming services started and many people had financial problems due to the pandemic.

But most of the time, people don’t drop streaming services entirely. You exchange them for others. 22% of respondents said they had added subscription services since the pandemic started, while 33% said they had added and canceled video subscriptions. Only 3% said they only canceled services.

What causes consumers to delete one streaming service, perhaps for another? Deloitte’s research suggests that cost is the main factor.

Almost half (49%) of respondents said the main reason for canceling a video subscription was a price increase.

Even so, the content remains a big deal. 31% say they would be most likely to quit if the shows and movies they liked were removed.

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.

Advertising society panel options Uber’s Head of Leisure and Cultural Advertising | LIFE+ARTS

LMU’s Marketing Society hosted a panel on Wednesday April 14th with Benjamin Trinh – Uber’s global director of entertainment and cultural marketing. This panel is part of the Marketing Society’s guest speaker series and was moderated by the Society’s Co-President Natalie Robles.

The event began with Robles asking Trinh to speak about his career and provide background information about himself. Speaking of his career, he said, “The goal of my team at Uber is to drive the brand towards culture.” Trinh then spoke about his personal life, mentioning that he was from Oakland, California and graduated from UC Davis. He then lived in several cities before finally settling in LA

Trinh decided to call LA his home because “Los Angeles makes a lot of sense to me because my career has been at the intersection of entertainment and technology and LA is the entertainment capital of the world.” Afterward, Robles stated that attendees could ask questions by unmuting or dropping their questions into the zoom chat box.

Most of the attendees asked questions about Trinh’s profession, college activities, advice for college students, and digital marketing. Among the details he revealed included that Uber has a big campaign ahead of them to put themselves at the forefront of the next Olympics, and that Postmates is currently working with a well-known celebrity to create a limited edition Shake Shack burger to create.

When asked why such panels would benefit business students, Francesca Diolanto, major in entrepreneurship, replied, “It would benefit students because they could link the knowledge they receive in school to a real-life example. This event is also beneficial because it helps students better understand the type of business field they are trying to enter. In this case, it is the grocery delivery business. “

Marina Deguchi, a freshman in business administration, replied, “I’ve been to many Marketing Society events and can keep in touch with the panelist afterwards. They will say, ‘Here is my username; You can contact me on LinkedIn. “” She continues, “I think this is very beneficial for networking, which helps business students in many ways.”

Overall, Diolanto and Deguchi emphasized the importance of networking and learning about certain business areas in their answers. They say the panel was very engaging and personal because of its informal and open nature. The ethos of the event was similar to that of a division at a daytime show. The students found it very informative for students looking to pursue careers in digital marketing.

Orlando automobile museum and leisure middle nonetheless want some work | Options

ORLANDO – Miami-based developer Michael Dezer and his partner, second-generation Argentine arcade mogul Sebastian Mochkovsky, are confident that Dezerland, a 450,000-square-foot entertainment hub in a twice-quirky mall on the north end of Orlando, is promised International Drive.

Although they kicked off a gentle opening in December, the interior of Dezerland is still swirling with more construction and staff than visitors. Its extensive car museum lacks important elements such as information about the cars and the right works of art in the exhibits.

The attraction includes bowling alleys, an arcade, a pinball arcade, a trampoline park, go-karts, and the Dezer Prize, a car collection that has consisted of the Orlando Auto Museum for the past half century.

Dezerland is located on the former site of the Festival Bay-Artegon Shopping Center at 5250 International Drive, Orlando. Artegon closed in 2017, and Dezer bought the 104-acre property the following year for $ 23.7 million. This comes from a report by Growthspotter.

The deal didn’t include two anchors: Bass Pro Shops and a Cinemark cinema. Both are still in operation, even though Bass has closed its entrance from the mall.

As a billionaire, real estate developer, and longtime employee of Donald Trump, Dezer sees value in the two anchors and outlet stores across the street, all of which have drawn customers through the mall’s various incarnations.

Dezer is building three apartment buildings with a total of more than 1,000 units on site. The first is scheduled to open in January.

In the first two years after the purchase, the project was fraught with production delays. In February 2019, the city issued a work stop order due to a lack of permits. “That wasn’t a big deal,” said Mochkovsky. “We cleared everything up with the city.”

In the next year, several opening dates were announced, but these were repeatedly pushed back due to construction delays. Then hit COVID-19.

“We couldn’t go on working,” said Dezer. “We were all very concerned because no one was going anywhere.”

In the summer, construction work began again in earnest. In December, when the US COVID deaths soared to their highest peaks, Dezerland was opened to the public.

“We wanted to open at Christmas time,” said Mochkovsky. “We didn’t want to miss the holidays.”

Mochkovsky, whose family has been building entertainment centers in his home country since 1957, runs the Dezerland Front with activities such as bowling and video games.

Mochkovsky opened the pinball arcade in March and is soon planning to set up a 6,000-square-meter augmented reality center where visitors can play virtual games without goggles or headsets.

Plans like this can feel far away depending on where you’re looking in Dezerland. Most of the old shop windows are shuttered, although Mochkovsky claims to have found tenants for all but three.

Cars are at the heart of Dezerland even before they even enter the museum. A model of Tow Mater from the film “Cars” greets the guests in front of the main entrance. Through the doors, one of the first sights you see is a replica of the city car from “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen,” the film that made Sean Connery stop acting.

Dezer’s car collection is extensive, including the world’s largest private collection of Vespas and the world’s first selection of James Bond vehicles on display in an upcoming Bond museum within the attraction.

Dezerland has more than 2,000 Dezer cars that he has been buying for over 50 years.

This collection was gathered in two locations in South Florida before Dezer bought the mall. He also maintains the Hollywood Cars Museum in Las Vegas. Another Dezerland in Miami has games and entertainment, but no cars.

Some of the cars in the open part of Dezerland are interesting, such as the tribute to Marilyn Monroe and the Rolls Royce built for the classic British puppet action show Thunderbirds.

Goldeneye’s Russian tank is in a Bond-themed restaurant.

Finally, Dezerland plans to open a car dealership. “I don’t really want to sell that much because I love her,” said Dezer.

The app, which is supposed to give guests information about the cars, contains entries that are missing information or that are complete for the wrong vehicles. “The guy who did it got corona (virus),” said Dezer. “So I’m waiting for him to come and finish.”

In the Hollywood section, only some of the cars have been used in movies while the others are replicas, but poor signage makes it impossible to tell which is which.

Prize money is given to a sedan that Trump made in the 1980s, one of two ever made. There’s a flag next to the car, but the eagle on the flagpole has a broken wing.

Dezer, who turned 80 on April 1, admits that the museum needs work.

“It’s my hobby, but I’m very, very busy in Miami right now,” he said.

However, these problems do not appear to be limited to work under construction. Negative reviews on TripAdvisor for the Hollywood Cars Museum and its previous locations in South Florida complain about “poorly executed” displays, dirty cars and an “unappealing” layout.

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.

MAD’s summer season “kickoff live performance” options Tab Benoit | Native Leisure

Grammy nominated singer, songwriter and guitarist Tab Benoit will present the Summer Kickoff Concert for the Murphy Arts District in El Dorado.

The event will take place on June 26th at the First Financial Music Hall. Doors open at 6 p.m. and the show starts at 7 p.m.

There are no entry costs for all first aiders and health care workers who present ID at the entrance.

Tickets for the general public are $ 5.

“The past year has been exhausting and challenging for first responders and health workers in our community. We wanted to give them a night to relax and listen to amazing music to say thank you, ”said Don Miller, Murphy USA Community Relations Ambassador.

Tab Benoit has built a career of more than 30 years based on his gritty and soulful Delta Swamp Blues. Benoit has won an ardent legion of fans and received 5 Blues Music Awards, including BB King Entertainer of the Year (twice) and inductance into the Louisiana Music Hall of Fame.

He has worked with Junior Wells, George Porter Jr., Dr. John, Willie Nelson and Billy Joe Shaver recorded and / or played, to name a few.

His achievements as a musician are complemented by his dedication to the environmental health of his Louisiana wetlands. Benoit is the founder and driving force behind Voices of the Wetlands, an organization that works to preserve the coastal waters of his home state. In 2010 he received the Governor’s Award for Conservationist of the Year from the Louisiana Wildlife Federation. Benoit also starred in the iMax film “Hurricane on the Bayou,” a documentary about the effects of Hurricane Katrina and a call to protect and restore the wetlands.

“We’re really looking forward to a night of first-class blues music at MAD. We’d like to thank Murphy USA for their partnership and for the idea of ​​celebrating our first responders and healthcare workers. They are always thinking about ways to give back to the community and we are honored to be a part of it, ”said Pam Griffin, CEO and President of the Murphy Arts District.

Tickets for the event will be sold to MAD members on Wednesday at 10 a.m. and to the general public on Friday at 10 a.m.

CLICK HERE to buy tickets online.

Tickets can be ordered at the box office at 870-444-3007. Tickets can also be purchased Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the box office at 101 East Locust Street.

The seat for the event is general admission in socially distant pods. All CDC public health recommendations are followed.