Fashion Idea needs to construct a greater trend future

Chris Halim and Raena Lim. (PHOTO: Style Theory)

Founded in 2016, Singaporean fashion rental platform Style Theory is one of Southeast Asia’s largest circular fashion platforms aiming to reshape women’s relationship with fashion. When Yahoo Life SEA met husband and wife team Chris Halim and Raena Lim, the driving force behind the brand, in their new showroom, Lim shared: “Personally, I feel very motivated to build a better fashion future. I think sustainability is a very big thing for our business and that’s also something that really appeals to me.”

The husband-and-wife team also admitted that starting the company was stressful at first, although they were used to each other’s working styles before Style Theory was born. “We have pretty clear boundaries at work and in personal life, so that helps,” Lim said.

However, the transition from employee to entrepreneur was a big leap. “It is a burden that we were previously employees of a company. Saturdays and Sundays are your own time, after work is like your own time. But when we became entrepreneurs, the two of us couldn’t walk together anymore, so it became a bit of an issue. We didn’t have any vacation for the first two years,” the co-founders shared.

Chris Halim and Raena Lim. (PHOTO: Style Theory)

As a rental platform for clothing and designer bags, the brand offers curated women’s pieces from its inventory on a monthly membership basis.

As stated on Style Theory’s website, hiring from the Circular Fashion platform for your next outfit means you no longer have to suffer from “worn-this-once” regrets or environmental guilt.

For most business owners, expanding during the COVID-19 pandemic is something that not many are interested in. For Style Theory, however, the brand had expanded the program to Hong Kong in the last year and has seen great success with its consumer base there. To quench our curiosity, we asked Halim why they chose Hong Kong for the latest expansion?

The story goes on

“For us, we saw that Singapore was a great success. It is the first market for our rental business and when we think about the next market we are trying to find similar and maybe even better markets than Singapore. In a way, if we look at Hong Kong, it’s a very similar market. People live in small houses, love fashion and live sustainability. These are great qualities to have in our business. Additionally, for our type of business, to a country or city where I would say the majority of women work, I think that usually suits us well too,” Halim said.

In 2022, Style Theory plans to expand its clothing rental business to Hong Kong and set up a warehouse there to facilitate and improve customer service for the brand.

Comparing Style Theory’s target markets, Lim shared that Hong Kong customers are trendier, while Singapore customers prefer casual looks and her Indonesian customers are more conservative in their style. “So if we source collections and stuff from the same designer, we might choose different things just for different markets.”

When it comes to designer bags, Lim found that high-end brands like Chanel and Louis Vuitton still have a strong following, while customers are more inclined to try indie brands when it comes to apparel. Lim, who hails from over 20 countries, shared that they’ve had inquiries from their members about certain indie brands like N12H, which are “really interesting moments where we see how different people’s perceptions of what they are.” choose between clothes and bags.”

Style Theory’s business model, supported by investors such as Softbank in both rental and resale businesses, has allowed the brand to excel not only in execution but also financially. “All of our inventory is provided by customers, so in that sense we are very well funded for our business. That will allow us to also be very, very lean and agile,” Lim added.

If you’re framing your New Year’s wardrobe by Marie Kondo and reducing your shopping intent, Style Theory 2022 could be the answer for you.

The Guardian view on trend in politics: tips on how to rewrite the fashion information | Editorial

VIrginia Woolf pinned it to “on or about” December 1910: the date when human nature changed. “All human relationships have changed” She wrote. “And when human relationships change, religion, behavior, politics, and literature change at the same time.” With a little exaggeration, we could assume that Black America changed in the late 1950s – and not just with the Civil rights movement, but across the spectrum of creativity and behavior. Aspects of this revolution are well documented: the Birth of coolness in jazz; the writers Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, Richard Wright. But some of the most mundane parts have been undervalued. Like clothes, for example.

Look at photos of black American men in the 1950s and 1960s, and what you notice is a coherence and a growing confidence in their looks. Here the saxophonist John Coltrane can be seen in a soft shoulder jacket and knitted tie, while here the writer Amiri Baraka can be seen in a button-down shirt and a cardigan with a shawl collar. The look is smart and yet casual – no thickly padded suits or repp striped ties here. As the college jackets and penny loafers suggest, it’s a style inspired by privileged white students at Ivy League colleges. You could even say it was appropriated – and then improved. The color palette is getting wider, the finishing touches are bolder: tie clips, collar pins, capped brogues. This look later becomes known as the Black ivy.

This uprising is featured in a new book entitled. documented and celebrated Black Ivy: A Revolt in Style. In his introduction, Jason Jules describes the look as “a kind of combat suit, a symbolic armor that is worn in the non-violent pursuit of fundamental change. Letting society treat them differently meant that the mainstream perceived them differently at first. ”Think of tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins in a button-down shirt playing Freedom suite, or Billy Taylor composing in a tweed jacket I wish I knew what it would feel like to be free. The goal was not just to join the elite, but to redefine it.

However subtly done, the style was a challenge to authority. Dressing like a college student was not an affectation but a crucial part of the desegregation struggles in America’s educational system. After the murders of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, the political mood changed – and so did street style. Stokely Carmichael went from working with John Lewis in sports jackets and ties to the leader of the Black Panthers in dark glasses and a black leather jacket, holding a rifle.

Miles Davis performs around 1959. Photo: Michael Ochs Archives / Getty Images

While the term “gesture politics” is always intended as an insult, we’re rewriting what counts as a political gesture: Just think of the squat controversy here and in the US. Historians have long argued that enslaved people and forced laborers resisted by dragging their feet or pretending that they did not understand the orders barked. Something similar has to happen with fashion, which is too often discussed as catwalk creations or January sales. But it can also be about expressing one’s self-image and beliefs. Black Ivy was about young black Americans who are changing the way they see themselves – starting with the mirror next to the cloakroom.

These Type Ideas Will Assist Curvy Lady to Not Let Weight Are available in Manner of Vogue

One should wear or dress however one likes. But if you’re caught in a style break, have just gained weight, or don’t know enough to dress for your body type, read on for some great style tips for plus size ladies. Guides on how to choose plus size outfits can help you look chic, stylish, and most importantly, feel happy.

Know that good interior or shapewear is your best friend

This suggestion isn’t just for plus size women; Every woman should wear well-fitting inner garments as this is the best way to ensure that your top clothes fit properly. Get measured to make sure you are wearing the correct size bra, and don’t limit yourself to large panties. Invest in attractive, supportive underwear and watch your self-esteem skyrocket! Shapewear will also help you smooth out those curves and make your dress look more flattering.

Dress according to your figure

Dressing in baggy t-shirts and bulky clothing can hide your bumps and bumps, but it also gives the impression that you have the anatomy of a sack. Dress your shape, not your size, and yes, round is a shape! Find clothes that fit you well and accentuate your figure instead of hiding under oversized clothes.

Understand your fabrics

A tank top made of polyester or lycra that hugs you and creates static bumps is less flattering than a stretchy, well-fitting cotton-spandex blend. Learning the composition and texture of materials can help you choose better fitting clothes when shopping online or in-store.

Love vintage

Vintage clothing is fantastic in many ways. Vintage clothing and accessories can quickly add a wow element to your ensemble as each piece is unique and the environmentally friendly recycled component is used. Vintage silhouettes such as dresses from the empire line are also incredibly flattering for women in plus sizes.

Say it with your shoes

Shoes are excellent because your feet can never get a “puffy day” so they always look and feel amazing when you wear them! They’re also a great way to add some individuality and flair to your ensemble without overdoing it. We love the texture of snake print boots to a plain black dress – instant glamor.

After all, when it comes to your personal style, the only norms you need to adhere to are those that you created for yourself and know they will work for you. Unless you really want to go with a trend, you don’t even have to follow it. Let your aesthetics reflect your personality and essentially feel safe and comfortable with what you are wearing.

Read all Latest news, Latest news and Coronavirus news Here.

The massive image: girls’s style finds an unlikely fashion hero | Pictures

In 1967, Caroline Baker who contributed as secretary Shirley Conran on the Observer, took a job with the fashion editor Molly Parkin at Nova, the iconoclastic women’s magazine. Parkin left soon after Baker’s arrival and Baker took over as she had never done a fashion shoot in her life. In the following years she developed a distinctive look that rebelled against the stereotypes of the industry. “I didn’t want to be this pretty girl, this toy for men,” she writes in the introduction to a new book that celebrates her career. Rebel Stylist: Caroline Baker – The woman who invented street fashion.

Instead of using clothing from design houses, Baker looked elsewhere for the material for their fashion sites, using oversized men’s clothing from thrift stores, fitted with belts and suspenders, army surplus, gauntlets and tights from ballet companies, chef’s clothes, school blazers, hospital gowns and pajamas. Her street style set the tone for punk fashion – Baker later worked with Vivienne Westwood – and the liberated androgyny of the 1980s and beyond.

An inspiration for this look was Charlie Chaplin, “his messy way of dressing”. This image, which is included in the book, was taken from a Nova shoot by photographer Sarah Moon, styled by Baker, not long before Nova’s death in 1975.

Moon was one of the few female fashion photographers at the time, and she and Baker made a series of films together that reinterpreted film nostalgia through a female lens. They went to Brighton to take the Chaplin pictures. “Sarah wanted two young children and an old car … you planned your fashion shoot like a mini movie, ”recalls Baker. Chaplin’s spacious silhouette had both a practical and an aesthetic appeal. “I was always so jealous that men were so lucky to have bags.” She decided women should have them too.

Rebel stylist is published by ACC Art Books (£ 35)

Sustainable Trend Present Provides Recent Look On Type & Atmosphere

PALOS VERDES, CA – South Bay locals are invited to a sustainable benefit and catwalk show hosted by New2U and South Bay Cares on Sunday. It is an event to raise awareness of the damage caused by fast fashion to our environment and how to defend against these harmful effects.

The event takes place from 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. at El Camp. Attendees can expect a catwalk, raffle prizes, speakers, DJs, and the sale of carefully used, curated clothing to promote new ways people look at their closets and the impact on our planet. Much of the proceeds will go to Sew Swag and the League of Women’s Voters.

The event is inspired by Daisy Hutton, co-founder of The Fixx Collective and Dillon Eisman, founder of Sew-Swag.

The clothing industry is the second largest industrial polluter after the oil industry. It is responsible for 10 percent of global CO2 emissions.

The fashion industry is currently responsible for more annual carbon emissions than all international flights and shipping combined, and around 85 percent of clothing and textile waste ends up in landfills or incinerators.

The price of the current fast fashion business model to our environment and developing countries is becoming more recognized, and a growing number of people want to make environmentally conscious and humane purchasing decisions.

“There are people who are trying to completely reform the system, from the materials we use to the way we make clothes and the way we shop,” the organizers told Patch. “We’ll be highlighting some of the change makers during our event and providing useful resources to help guide our fashion mindset in a more sustainable direction.”

Daisy Hutton, co-founder of The Fixx collective talks about practical steps to develop a stylish, sustainable wardrobe. She combines years of experience in the fashion industry and passion for our environment in her approach to fashion art.

Dillon Eisman, founder of Sew swag will talk about his journey to found Sew Swag. Sew Swag Inc. is a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit that transforms damaged and donated clothing into fashionable outfits for the greater Los Angeles homeless population. Her goal is to give those in need the clothing and dignity necessary to begin the transition from the street. Sew Swag has a wide range of impacts across Southern California through partnerships with other nonprofits and animal shelters.

The sustainable fashion show takes place at El Camp, 2150 Park Place, Ste 100, El Segundo. Tickets are $ 10 and are free for students. BrownBag link + QR code. Visit the website for more event information: https://m.bpt.me/event/5265606

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‘I am embracing the discomfort’: Trend model execs share how their workplace model has remodeled

This article was reported on – and first published by – Digiday siblings Glittering

There has been a lot of speculation over the past 19 months as to whether the so-called sweatpants revolution will continue after returning to the office.

The predictions were shared. Some have said that people are so used to it wear comfortable clothing – in addition, the dress codes in the office are loosening anyway – that they go to work in sweatshirts and styles that could also serve as pajamas. Others have said that after many months of wearing nothing but the same sweatpants, people feel like they have Opportunity to dress up.

In conversations with executives in the fashion industry, it becomes clear that a change in style is taking place. Office cabinets are more casual and comfortable than ever before. However, for some – especially those who find themselves personally fulfilling through their style – returning to the office is indeed a good reason to give your all.

Sarah LaFleur, founder and CEO of womenswear brand MMLaFleur, said she took the opportunity to purchase an entirely new wardrobe before the company returned to the office in June.

“It was a small investment, but I bought a new capsule wardrobe,” said LaFleur. “I have four new pants, three new dresses, four new T-shirts and six knitted tops. Knit tops are inherently stretchy, so they’re my first choice when it comes to looking polished yet comfortable. “

LaFleur, who gave birth to twins during the pandemic, said comfort has become a priority for her since she returned to the office. And she sees the same trend in the brand’s sales: knitwear made up 25% of MMLaFleur’s sales in 2020, up from 16% in 2019.

John Shumate, vice president of global brand marketing at Champion, said the pandemic had drastically changed the clothing of many of the company’s employees, including himself.

“At Champion, we wear our sweatshirts, sweatpants, and hoodies, but that wasn’t always the case,” Shumate said. “It was more common to wear suits and traditional office attire, but the reason I love working at this sportswear company is because we have the flexibility to express our style and feel confident in what we wear. When I put on a fleece, jogger or hoodie to work, it feels sublime and I feel good in it. It enables me to think creatively and do a great job. ”

In particular, Shumate said he wore Champion’s reverse weave and tech fleece hoodies.

Activewear brands have taken up the desire to dress more comfortably in the office. While the Rhone and Vuori were booming during the pandemic, recently thanks to the incarceration of people at home, they have made the decision to make office-friendly clothing like shirts and polos for men from stretchy materials.

But not every manager attaches importance to comfort. Molly Howard, co-founder of women’s fashion brand La Ligne, had the opposite path for her personal office style last year. Before the pandemic, she dressed much more comfortably in the office.

“When we started La Ligne, I rebelled against my previous career in finance, where we had a super strict dress code and wore these really uncomfortable clothes for 20 hours a day,” said Howard. “When I started La Ligne, my style was always about comfort. I wore sweatpants all the time and encouraged the team to dress how they wanted and be as comfortable as possible. “

But for Howard, more than a year and a half at home left her longing for the chance to dress up. She also had a baby during the pandemic. The combination of wearing the same sweatpants all the time and the stress of pregnancy has resulted in her expressing herself through clothing in ways she was unable to.

“I’m putting more energy than ever into what my outfit looks like,” said Howard. “I’ve lived in a pregnant body for so long, haven’t made nearly as much contact as I used to, and haven’t even touched a pair of jeans in more than 11 months. And I wanted to get something back from that expression. “

Howard said her team has been on a similar path since returning to the office in September. At an e-commerce photo shoot she attended on Wednesday, she found that no one was wearing sweatpants. Howard stressed that La Ligne has no dress code and that wearing sweatpants is in no way discouraged. “I wouldn’t even think of making a rule about what people can wear,” she said. But more and more members of their team are simply dressing up because they are happy to have the chance.

“It feels good to match my shoes with my sweater and button up a pair of jeans and wear them, even if they are less comfortable than sweatpants,” she said. “I embrace the discomfort.”

‘I’m embracing the discomfort’: Fashion brand execs share how their office style has transformed

Ree Drummond Shares Her Trend Fashion and the Clothes That Makes It the ‘Finest Day of My Life’

Ree Drummondis new Walmart clothing line perfectly represents the style of the Pioneer Woman star. In an interview with People, Drummond shared her penchant for fluid feminine fashion and revealed the types of clothing that bring her happiness and make her “the best day of my life”.

Ree Drummond | Monica Schipper / Getty Images for The Pioneer Woman Magazine

Ree Drummond’s Walmart clothing reflects her love for feminine styling

In an interview with persons, Drummond talked about her Fall collection from Walmart and what inspired the clothing line that includes jeans, leggings, sweaters, tops, dresses and athleisure pieces.

The Pioneer Woman star shared that, though she has lost weight, she still relies on her signature flowing tops. “I’ve found that I love the same clothes. My size may be a little smaller, but I still love them [loose] Silhouettes, ”said Drummond. “A little frill here and there. Empire waist. I still like the loose fit with enough small details that it doesn’t look like I’m wearing curtains.

She added, “It’s still very flattering. I still love the same style. “

She said well-fitting clothing is a game changer

Drummond’s fashion leanings are unmistakable, with lots of floral patterns in the mix. She explained, “Everyone who knows me knows that I have a certain look that is feminine and floral and not as fit because I have four children.”

Drummond also admitted that she doesn’t have a “favorite shop or designer,” and she thinks so Discover clothes that fit is the most important thing to her.

“If it suits me, I love it. It doesn’t matter where it comes from, what it’s made of, ”she explained. “If I find a top that I like or a sweater that fits, it’s simply the best day of my life.”

During their live event for Walmart, a fan asked Drummond what her favorite design was, and she shared how her collection portrayed her “favorite shapes”.

“They look at my favorite shapes and that was one of the reasons I wanted to start The Pioneer Woman clothing line,” she replied. “Because I’m always looking for the perfect top that fits me well. I don’t care where it is or what I have to do to get it – if it suits me, I’m happy. ”

Commented Drummond, “And so I wanted to be able to bring all the tops I had in my head to life so you could check out some of my favorite designs.”

‘The Pioneer Woman’ star shared her favorite pieces from the Walmart collection

Drummond is a fan of everything in their fall Walmart collection, but shared their enthusiasm for the sweaters in an October interview Life in the south Magazine.

“For the first time we now have sweaters. I will live in them, ”she explained. You are my favorites. I love sweaters when they’re flattering. Sometimes they can be big and bulky, but they are not. “

Drummond continued, “My favorite is the black and teal floral print with a waterfall neckline. It’s all I love about sweater-shaped clothes. Small bell sleeves, large bluebells, a waterfall neckline … well, I grew up in the 70s. ”

She also shared her love for the solid V-neck sweater in her collection, stating, “The shape is so cute.”

TIED TOGETHER: ‘The Pioneer Woman’: Ree Drummond shared her simple weight loss tips

Inventive couture and a rock come collectively for a Sound & Model Trend Present | Weekender | Group

Dressed in a leopard-flecked top, alligator green sleeves, and coral trousers, Tolliver Shearn knows a thing or two when it comes to “makeover” on a fashion runway.

“You always think about your next step,” he says with a smile. “You also spend a lot of time looking at yourself in the bedroom and perfecting the perfect pose.”

That’s because Shearn is not a professional Zoolander. Instead, he’s a student at Western Iowa Tech Community College who attended the Sound & Style Fashion Show on Saturday at the Warrior Hotel, 525 Sixth St.

It’s a fundraiser for the Sioux City Conservatory of Music and begins with a matinee before the symphony from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. a DJ dance party from 9 p.m.

What does fashion have to do with music? According to Conservatory of Music co-founder Gia Emory, there has always been a connection between musicians and designers.

“When you think of David Bowie and Prince, how they look is as important as their sound,” she explains.

Emory was a West Coast stylist for fashionable women like Britney Spears and Priscilla Presley for many years.

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Grace Emory is just as stylish as her mother. In fact, North High School 11th grade is considering a career as a fashion designer.

“You don’t have to spend a lot of money to look good,” she says. “You can take old clothes, make a few changes and turn them into something really eye-catching.”

Grace Emory was an example of her “upcycle” style, wearing an old cardigan, vintage concert t-shirt, wrap skirt, and leggings.

East High School 10th grade Chloie Roupe sported a similar look with a cardigan, animal print leggings, and a flowing dress.

“My style is a little retro and at the same time a little futuristic,” explains Roupe, who names both singer Lady Gaga and designer Betsey Johnson as style icons.

Like Grace Emory, Roupe is an aspiring fashion designer who will be showing fashion during the Sound & Style Show.

“My grandmother taught me to sew,” says Roupe. “I’ve been experimenting with fabrics ever since.

In addition to Roupe and Grace Emory, clothing by Rachel Anne Rainwater from Los Angeles and Sean Bolte from Minneapolis will also be shown on the catwalk. So is Paul Chelstad, a Sioux City-based artist who will be exhibiting some of his graffiti-inspired fashions.

Surely Miguel “Nasty” Almaraz-Castaneda, the 21-year-old owner of the graphic design collective Nasty Collective, will take a lot of high fashion photos.

“I take photos, make videos, do graphic design and even do a little podcasts whenever I get the chance,” he says. “Have to do whatever you can to get through.”

Almaraz-Casteneda has been homeless for much of the past five years.

“My mother turned me away when I was 16,” he says. “Since then I’ve been alone.”

That didn’t stifle Almaraz-Castaneda’s ambitions and creativity.

He names Biggie Smalls, Tupac Shakur and Quentin Tarantino as unlikely muses.

“There’s style in both hip-hop and filmmaking,” he says. “I like it.”

So who is Rebecca Ericksen’s fashion hero? Probably not her father.

“I’ve seen Becca buy old goodwill men’s jeans, change a few things, and wear them to school,” says Tim Ericksen as his Sergeant Bluff-Luton Community High School daughter walks the Sound & Style runway. “I’ll tell her I have a lot of old jeans that she can ‘upcycle’. So far, Becca has not accepted my offer. “

Fashion is a creative outlet, says Rebecca Ericksen.

“I just like to take something used and make it new again,” says the first-time model.

While Rebecca Ericksen is still working out the kinks in her model poses, Zoe Belk already feels at home in front of an audience.

“I’ve never modeled before, but I’m also a singer,” says the Western Iowa Tech Community College student who modeled for one night. “A catwalk is just another type of stage.”

Which is a good attitude. After all, fashion creates trust.

“I started looking into fashion to express myself creatively,” says Grace Emory. “I show the world who I am when I dress the way I do.”

Chloie Roupe nods her head in agreement.

“Fashion should show your personality,” she says. “It’s a reflection of who you are.”

In fashionable destroyed jeans, cool kicks and a white shirt, photographer “Nasty” Almaraz-Castanada is just as trendy as everyone on the catwalk.

“Confidence in yourself is the key,” he says. “That’s true no matter what you do.”

The Finest Road Fashion at Shanghai Trend Week Spring 2022

Years ago we started calling it fashion month, not fashion week, and now it’s more fashion month, plural. To be honest, there is always Fashion Week somewhere. Just days after the Paris Spring 2022 shows, hundreds of designers are preparing for Shanghai’s second IRL, Post-Pandemic Fashion Week. From the main venue in Xintiandi to Labelhood’s vibrant platform for emerging designers, the week is going to be busier than anything we’ve seen in New York or Europe. Dave Tacon is on site and covers the best street style between shows; Scroll through his latest coverage here.

Store eight Milan Trend Week Avenue Fashion Appears From the Spring 2022 Reveals

There is a very short and sweet part of the transition period when you can wear nice pairings like sweaters and shorts or jackets and sandals – if the weather permits, of course. It’s the kind of ensemble that Los Angeles locals are lucky enough to wear for most of the year. But for the rest of us who don’t call Southern California home, the ideal fall forecast gives us a chance to make the most of our summer and Autumn wardrobes.

This last week in MilanHer show goers welcomed perfect temperatures in the low 70s and sunny skies and got a few extra days of sandal season. Chunky knits and plaid trousers were paired with heeled sandals, as were brown leather trousers and blazers. Fuzzy mohair cardigans, midi skirts, velvet jackets and cuts from head to toe were on display alongside open-toe shoes. The judgment? sandal Season is not over yet.

When the temperatures cool down, all of these looks go well with you knee high boots or Ballet flat, but in the meantime, do like the Milan Fashion Week street style set and take the opportunity to wear sandals with other classic fall staples.

Below are eight ways to wear sandals this season, inspired by the street style of Milan Fashion Week.

Buckle up

A pair of buckled mules easily grounds oversized knit and flared trousers – no jacket required.

MM6 Maison Margiela oversized jacquard knit turtleneck

Valentino Garavani Mini VLogo hobo bag made from calf hair

Stella McCartney Mona wool trousers with flared legs and houndstooth check

Leather bound

Pick up patent, wrinkled, vintage or smooth leather separations with strappy sandals – you guessed it – leather.

Rejina Pyo Margo Blazer made of synthetic leather

Kassl Bag Lady leather lacquer shoulder bag

Bouguessa Diana embossed leather pants

Double intake

Now wear an embroidered blouse and tapered pants with buckled mules and repeat this later with ankle boots.

Sea Santos blouse with eyelet collar

Bottega Veneta Loop shoulder bag

Ulla Johnson Jupiter carrot trousers made of cotton twill with quilted seams

Jil Sander x Birkenstock Arizona two-buckle sandal

Compensation blocks

A metallic block heel sandal is comfortable to wear all year round, from special occasions to the office and beyond.

Warm Hugs Only checkmate vest

Linda Farrow Jerry round frame acetate sunglasses

Jil Sander skirt with geometric print

Hang around

When else could you wear comfortable, cozy tartan slippers or? Sheepskin slides Out of the house outside of autumn?

Sleeper pajama set made of crpe de chine with feather trim

Evolve Together Milan Face Mask, 7 Inch Set

Prada Galleria Medium Saffiano Leather Bag

Sandals that fit

A flat leather sandal with straps goes surprisingly well with the tailored suits of fall – a neutral brown option creates a solid contrast to an otherwise dark blazer and trousers.

& Other Stories One button blazer

Melissa Joy Manning moonstone earrings made from 14k recycled gold

& Other Stories figure-hugging flare pinstripe trousers

Autumnal textures

It is best to avoid summer-like materials such as raffia and ropes and opt for something that is more geared towards the fall season, such as this combination of satin sleigh and velvet jacket.

L’Agence Kaydence double-breasted corduroy blazer

Saint Laurent Signature round sunglasses

Emme Parsons satin slippers

Head over heels

You’ll want to wear a pair of Bottega Veneta heeled sandals with everything.

Marc Jacobs hairy, cropped mohair cardigan

Ray-Ban Classic Wayfarer 50mm sunglasses

Bottega Veneta BV Lido Slide sandal