Covid vaccines for teenagers are coming quickly — some households are counting the minutes

Judi Hayes, a Florida mother, said she couldn’t wait to get her 10-year-old son, Will, back into the classroom. However, she persists until he can be vaccinated.

“He’s sad. He misses his friends and his teachers and the Special Olympics tennis,” said Hayes, whose child has Down syndrome and has been doing virtual learning since the pandemic began in spring 2020.

Hayes said she excluded her son from face-to-face learning because his Down syndrome puts him at greater risk of complications from Covid-19. She and a handful of other parents are currently suing Governor Ron DeSantis and state education officials over the governor’s ban on masking obligations in schools. Will’s 13-year-old brother is vaccinated and goes to class, albeit masked.

Parents lead their children on the first day of school amid the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) at West Tampa Elementary School in Tampa, Florida, the United States, Aug. 10, 2021.

Octavio Jones | Reuters

“He doesn’t really understand why his brother goes to school and he doesn’t,” said Hayes. “This is where the vaccine comes in. We’ll get him vaccinated as soon as possible and hopefully he can go back to school in January.”

While the Biden administration takes care of the compilation and dispatch of cans of. begins Pfizer‘s and BioNTechAs early as this week, some parents say they are preparing their children for a return to “normal” – face-to-face learning, exercise, and other extracurricular activities that are largely conducted, “s Covid vaccine for children ages 5-11 for vaccinations as early as this week were holding on because of the pandemic.

Even though the daily number of Covid cases in the US is falling, the virus infects an average of more than 72,000 Americans per day, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University. Children make up a larger proportion of new infections.

Children aged 5 to 11 made up 10.6% of all reported Covid cases nationwide for the week ending October 10, despite the fact that they make up about 8.7% of the US population, according to data Data compiled from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Although children are less prone to serious illnesses than adults, a small proportion of them do. At least 5,217 children have suffered from Childhood Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome, or MIS-C, a rare but serious complication associated with Covid.

Fully vaccinating 1 million children aged 5 to 11 would prevent 58,000 Covid infections, 241 hospital stays, 77 ICU stays and one death a modeled scenario published by the Food and Drug Administration last week. Up to 106 children would have vaccine-induced myocarditis, but most would recover, according to the agency.

A student is attending an online class from home in Miami, Florida, United States on Thursday, September 3, 2020.

Eva Marie Uzcategui | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Children are generally less severely infected, but “they can get infected to the point where they suffer and are hospitalized and die,” said Dr. Paul Offit, pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and a member of the FDA’s Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee.

Offit joined his colleagues on the FDA committee last week Pfizer vaccine recommendation for young children. “The benefit of vaccinating children is obvious,” he said.

The White House said it had raised enough doses to vaccinate all 28 million 5-11 year olds in the US and said it started the process on Friday of taking 15 million doses from Pfizer’s freezers and facilities to transport the distribution centers. The FDA approved the doses on Friday, and a CDC panel is expected to make a recommendation on the doses on Tuesday. CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky could sign out soon afterwards.

The cans will have different directions and packaging to help medical providers not to confuse the shots with the company’s doses for people over 12, officials said. The vaccine is given in smaller doses in children, one third of the dose for adolescents and adults.

States are already preparing. California health authorities, for example said Wednesday The state will have 4,000 sites ready to deliver 1.2 million Covid vaccinations to children ages 5-11 once the vaccines are approved by federal agencies.

Katie O’Shaughnessey, an educator and mother of three who lives in Connecticut, said her 10-year-old daughter Maeve asked to be injected for her birthday in a few weeks. She said they are already trying to make an appointment with a local pediatrician.

Aside from attending school and some extracurricular activities, O’Shaughnessey said that she and her wife didn’t allow their daughter much else. While she acknowledged that children are generally less at risk of severe Covid, they are not at risk.

“For them this is their freedom,” she said. “We didn’t allow her to go to a restaurant. We didn’t see a show. A neighbor of ours was on a show in the theater, like on a professional tour, and we wanted her to see her friend and we said, ‘Sorry, you can’t go.’ “

O’Shaughnessey said she doesn’t know of any parents who say they are reluctant to get their child vaccinated – although surveys show many parents in the U.S. are reluctant.

According to a survey published by the Kaiser Family Foundation on Thursday a third of the parents in the US say they would not vaccinate their children between the ages of 5 and 11 immediately and wait to see how the vaccine roll-out goes. The main concerns parents have about vaccinating their children have to do with “possible unknown long-term effects and serious side effects of the vaccine,” Kaiser said.

Pfizer says its study, which included more than 3,000 children who received the vaccine, found the syringes were well tolerated, with the most common side effects being mild and comparable to those seen in a study of teenagers and adults in old age From 16 to 25 years of age, effects for adolescents and adults are fatigue, headache, muscle pain, chills, fever and nausea, according to the CDC.

A boy rides his bike past a sign at the Pershing School in Orlando, advising that face masks are required for students until October 30, 2021.

Paul Hennessy | LightRakete | Getty Images

Still, federal agencies say they are monitoring for rare heart infections, myocarditis, and pericarditis, which have occurred in a very small number of young adults who have received either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine. There were no cases of myocarditis in Pfizer’s study for children, but officials said the study may have been too small to identify the rare heart disease.

Dr. Theodore Ruel, director of the Department of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco, said parents’ concerns are understandable, especially since mRNA vaccines are a relatively new technology that many people are unfamiliar with.

“But at the end of the day it’s just like a regular vaccine, that is, you get this protein from the virus and your body reacts to it,” he said. “I’m afraid that part of the innovation angle may have mystified it, even though it works in the same way as other vaccines.”

Lora Vail, a Florida parent, said she wasn’t hesitant about getting her 6-year-old son, Cooper, vaccinated. She and her husband are already fully vaccinated with the Pfizer vaccine and have an appointment to get a booster dose.

“We look forward to having our son vaccinated too, so he is protected and can protect others,” she said.

She said that many children don’t really get seriously ill with Covid, but it “doesn’t take into account the children who get sick, end up in intensive care and sadly die”.

“I wonder how much is too much,” she said. “For me it is one.”

South Carolina mother Shirley Grace said she looks forward to “adventuring” her 6-year-old son Michael again once he’s vaccinated. They used to go to weekly markets, museums, the zoo and libraries before the pandemic broke out.

“Although I’ve only limited our trips to places with Covid precautions, better protection for his father and me gives him the peace of mind that we have to go out again,” she said.

First responder hockey match raises cash for households of fallen Colorado officers

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FORT COLLINS, Colorado (KRDO) – The Colorado Springs Police Department participated in a statewide charity hockey tournament that raised money for the families of fallen law enforcement officers.

Over the weekend, Blue Warriors Hockey teamed up with the Fort Collins Pond Hockey League to host the Fallen Heroes Memorial Tournament.

According to Blue Warriors, the tournament raised money for local heroes who died on duty. All players are first responders from government agencies across the state.

This year the tournament raised money for the families of Boulder Officer Eric Talley and Arvada Officer Gordon Beesley.

Talley was one of ten victims of the King Soopers mass shooting in Boulder. Beesley was shot dead in Olde Town Arvada in June.

The hockey tournament raised about $ 30,000.

Learn more about it Blue Warriors Hockey, click here.

Absolutely Colorado / Colorado Springs / Local News / State and Regional News / Video / VOSOTs

Some households might be getting a bit of more money of their pockets this yr. – FOX13 Information Memphis

Memphis, Tennessee – Thanks to the expanded child tax credit approved by the American Rescue Plan Act.

Memphians learned this Saturday at the second of two tax events this weekend hosted by the IRS and the United Way.

“The Child Tax Credit is a credit for anyone who has children under the age of 17, and most people are eligible for this credit without doing anything,” said Letitia Williams, manager of the Taxpayer Assistance Center.

Williams said there are a few changes this year, including increasing the loan from $ 1,000 to a maximum of $ 3,000 per child.

“We’re here today to help taxpayers qualify for child tax deduction,” she said. “The child discount was changed this year to allow people to receive this advance year-round. Most people will have quality for it if they have children under the age of 17. “

The first monthly American Rescue Plan child tax credit payments were made on July 15 and will be paid monthly through December 15.

Families receive up to $ 300 per month for each child under 6 years of age and up to $ 250 per month for children 6 to 17 years of age.

Volunteers and IRS staff also helped people get other benefits such as: B. Registration for the third wave of stimulus checks valued at $ 1,400. You can also request the refund credit for any amount you may have missed on the first two exams.

Williams said events like this don’t just benefit families who benefit.

“It will kick off the economy and kick-start the economy and have people who can get this money all year round and not have to wait until the end of the year to get this loan,” she said.

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Navy households and veterans extra prone to lose cash to scams

TUCSON (KVOA) – Service members, military spouses and veterans all reported a higher likelihood of losing money and higher average dollar losses to scammers, the company said 2020 BBB Scam Tracker Risk Report.

The report was made by the BBB Institute for Marketplace Trust (BBB Institute) the study analyzes cases of fraud reported to BBB Scam-TrackerSMhighlighting the latest consumer fraud risks. Veterans reported an average loss of $ 133, military spouses reported an average loss of $ 132, and active duty members reported an average loss of $ 269 – all higher than the average loss of $ 115 incurred for all consumers in 2020 was reported.

“Historically, we have reported higher mean casualties from the military community,” said Melissa Trumpower, executive director of the BBB Institute. “However, 2020 was the first year we also saw higher rates of military consumers losing money to scammers.”

The probability of loss for all consumers in 2020 was 46.4%. Veterans stated a slightly higher probability of loss of 46.8%. Military families gave the highest probability of loss with 50.8% for military spouses and 59.7% for military members.

“The biggest factor that contributed to these higher loss probabilities across the board was the increase in Online purchase fraud and online scams in general, ”says Trumpower. “When you consider that in 2020 most people made more online purchases than normal, this was an expected change, but one that is alarming. In a BBB survey of over 5,000 people who reported scams to BBB Scam TrackerSM in 2020, 43.1% said they spent more time online because of the pandemic, and 57.1% said they were because of the pandemic Having made more online purchases.

Online purchase fraud has been the riskiest type of scam for service members and veterans, with the riskiest type of items purchased online Pets and pet supplies. Riskiest military spouse scam in 2020 was Employment fraud. This included flexible ways to work from home that were found online and that were often involved counterfeit check or Returns fraud.

“We continue to work with our partners to fight fraud targeting the military and share prevention messages through BBBs serving communities across North America,” Trumpower said.

LEARN MORE

To learn more about BBB’s Military and Veterans Initiative, visit BBB.org/military.

Patrice Adams Basis raises cash for grieving households in want

ORANGE GROVE, Texas – Orange Grove hosted a special fundraiser for the Patrice Adams Foundation on Saturday. The foundation provides help and support as well as financial support for grieving families who cannot finally say goodbye to their deceased child or relatives.

“A lot of people don’t plan ahead for such circumstances, they usually wait until it’s too late and their family member has passed away, and they don’t have the money to look after them properly, so we are here to take care of their families Bring calm, “said Eric Spieler of the Patrice Adams Foundation.

The foundation was established after the death of Patrice Adams, who died in February 2015.
All of the money raised from Saturday’s event will go to benefit families who need it.

You can learn more about the Patrice Adams Foundation from click here.

Myanmar migrant staff work overseas to feed their households. Now they cannot ship the cash dwelling

“I left him with my mother,” said the 26-year-old migrant worker from Myanmar, who lives in Thailand.

Every morning long lines of people wait for hours in front of banks and ATMs across Myanmar. Withdrawal limits were limited to around 200,000 kyat ($ 120 USD) per customer per day and some even run out of cash as people stop depositing money for security reasons.

“If I send money home, my family can usually withdraw the money the next day,” said Su. “But lately the internet has been down and it’s difficult to get the money out, and we don’t think we can trust the bank either.”

Su and Zaw, migrant workers in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021.Su and her husband are among the 1.7 million Myanmar citizens who work in neighboring Thailand, according to the Migrant Workers Group, are part of an important network of foreign workers who support relatives at home. The International Labor Organization (ILO) Estimates About $ 1.4 billion was sent to Myanmar by foreign workers in 2015.

The current situation is gone Thousands of migrants live with it constant concern not only for the financial well-being of loved ones, but also for their safety. More than 860 people have been killed by security forces since the coup and more than 6,000 have been arrested, according to the AAPP.

Su’s mother tells her not to worry as the fighting in her village is not intense. “But you have to be careful,” said Su. “They no longer sleep soundly and hardly ever go out.”

But without money to stock up on food or medicine, it will not be easy to fall by the wayside in the long term.

“I want to work in Myanmar again because we have so many difficulties working in other countries and I want to live at home with my family too,” she said.

But she is afraid of what could happen if she and her husband Zaw, 30, who also works in a factory in Bangkok, return. “If we try to go back, they will arrest us even if we are not involved in politics,” she said.

Zaw speaks of the agony of watching his country rise from a distance while the Myanmar military, the Tatmadaw, continue their brutal crackdown on opponents of the coup. “I can’t go back and fight,” he said. “Even if I don’t mind risking my life for the next generation, I want real democracy in my country.”

Rising poverty in Myanmar

Prior to the coup, Christina’s older brother typically sent home up to $ 240 a month, which his family of 10 depended on for food and medicine. All of that stopped after the coup when the banks closed.

Christina, who uses a pseudonym for security reasons, said the family had to leave their home in Mindat city, southern Chin state, Myanmar. when the fighting started there. Now, it is not just the food they need.

“Because we’re in a place where there are no doctors and nurses, even with a headache, we have trouble buying medication because it’s been a few months,” she said.

Nor can they return home to grow new plants that they have relied on for food and for sale, so will the next few years was difficult, she said. You are currently living in a camp for internally displaced persons.

As bombs fall on Myanmar's hotbeds of rural resistance, tens of thousands flee into the jungle without food or water

Wai, who also uses a pseudonym for security reasons, said his brother works in Thailand and sent home $ 150-180 a month to his elderly mother, who lives alone in her village. She used it as medicine when he said her health was deteriorating. Wai said his mother saved some of the remittances, but in a month her reserves would be used up.

“Since I have family, I cannot support them either. My brother can’t send money. So mom uses her savings to support herself and has to borrow from other family members in the village, ”said Wai.

“I sell groceries in the factories and we were fine before the coup. But after the coup most of the factories are closed and I couldn’t sell any more. So we fight. So I asked my brother to send me some money. He said he would do that. But since we could not receive from here, our family is also in trouble. “

A Report published The United Nations estimated in late April that by early 2022, up to half of Myanmar’s population could be living in poverty due to “aggravating negative shocks”. The report found that 83% of Myanmar households own theirs The incomes had almost halved on average because of the Covid pandemic.

This situation has worsened since the coup.

Fear for family safety

Ma Oo has lived in Thailand for 20 years, helping migrant workers obtain documents for legal work and advocating for their rights. Their children studied in Thailand and are now working in the countryside. But she is worried about the rest of her family who stayed in Shan State in Myanmar.

Her father, she said, worked as a public relations organizer for the National League for Democracy (NLD), the democratically elected party that was overthrown by the military coup. Ma Oo suspects her father was arrested, but even now, four months later, she is unsure.

“The military has arrested everyone involved with the NLD. I lost touch with my father when I heard about the coup. I worry about my entire family as we are all involved in the party. Mine Father was arrested twice in the 1990s for being involved with NLD and now we assume he was arrested again because we lost touch with him. “

Not knowing the whereabouts or well-being of family members affected by the crackdown on the military junta is traumatizing for those unable to return home.

Ma Oo, migrant rights lawyer in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021

Kyokyani, 35, works in a bakery in Bangkok. His wife works in a textile factory, but his 85-year-old mother is too frail to take part from her village in Myanmar’s Mandalay region.

Kyokyani, who also wants to be identified by name for security reasons, said his older brother was recently arrested by security forces and held for three days. “The military is putting our village under pressure because of the protests and wanted to arrest the leaders of the protests. But they couldn’t find her, so they arrested my brother, ”he said.

“I’m very sad and worried about my family,” he said, adding that most of the villagers are day laborers and struggle to make ends meet. “I can’t go back and help them and that worries me even more.”

Kyokyani said the business collapsed after Covid and he couldn’t send as much money home as he usually did. The coup made things worse and he’s been unable to send money since the military took power.

Sustaining yourself is a challenge.

“There are fewer jobs here in Thailand and I still have to spend on my accommodation and food, so I can’t make as much as I did before,” he said.

Myat, a migrant worker in Bangkok, Thailand in May 2021. The migrant worker colleague Myat fears for the safety of his family. His relative worked at a gold mine in the southeastern state of Kayah, which employed 11 workers allegedly killed during a military air raid in late March.

He said his relative wasn’t working that day but asks why the miners were targeted in the first place. “I can’t stand it. They are innocent people from the forest. I don’t think they even have an internet, so they wouldn’t have known what was happening,” he said.

He stared at a photo of one of the victims on his cell phone and said, “I’m not just concerned about my family, but the whole country. I worry about everyone because they kill teenagers. The youth are Myanmar’s future, but they value them less than animals. “

For Su and Zaw, whose 7-year-old is still with his grandparents in Myanmar, it is almost too much to think about his future without sending money to an upside-down country.

“I am very worried about my child as a mother. We have heard that the military is putting people in our village, especially the boys and men, into slave labor so that they cannot sleep soundly at night,” said Su.

“I miss my child. I cannot go back to him because of the dire situation. I am sad.”

CNN’s Salai TZ and Kocha Olarn contributed to the coverage.

Golf event in Agawam raises cash for non-profit that helps households with disabilities

FEEDING HILLS, Mass. (WWLP) – High ambitions for a golf tournament in Feeding Hills that raises money for a good cause.

People met Wednesday at Oak Ridge Country Club for the 42nd annual Tony Strycharz Memorial Golf Tournament. Jericho, a Springfield Diocese nonprofit that helps families with disabilities, intends to raise tens of thousands of dollars from the event.

Police have been looking for a missing Agawam man since April

“Our goal today is to collect $ 30,000 between golf and the raffles. We hope that everyone who has come will open their wallets and wallets and be very generous to us, ”said Linda LaPointe, Executive Director of the Bureau of Exceptional Children & Adults.

This is the largest fundraiser in Jericho every year.

‘Assist a Hero’ occasion to lift cash for Highway Residence Program, which helps veterans, households with PTSD

CHICAGO (WLS) – A mother from Chicago who lost her son, a soldier in Afghanistan, works to help veterans and their families with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Corporal Conner Lowry was killed abroad in 2012. Modie Lavin used her grief to help other soldiers and their families, and now she has support from a local aldermen.

Modie Lavin is the Outreach Coordinator for the Road Home Program in Rush and the 19th Ward Alderman Matt O’Shea is starting the “Help a Hero” fundraiser this month to help. They joined ABC7 to talk about the program and fundraiser.

You can find more information about the fundraiser at www.the19thward.com For more information on the Road Home program, please visit roadhomeprogram.org.

Copyright © 2021 WLS-TV. All rights reserved.

Ricky Martin needs to ‘normalize’ households like his | Leisure

Ricky Martin wants to “normalize” families like his.

The ‘Livin’ la vida loca ‘hitmaker has twins Matteo and Valentino (12), Lucia (2) and Renn, born in October 2019, with his husband Jwan Yosef.

And the 49-year-old actor spoke about how a family with two fathers shouldn’t be stigmatized or taboo.

Speaking on The Ellen DeGeneres Show about being on the cover of People’s Pride Issue, he said, “I just want to normalize families like mine.

“I know it’s very interesting for a lot of people who say to me, ‘Thank you Ricky for posting this picture with you and your husband and kids. It made me feel better. ‘”

In the meantime, the singer of “She Bangs” has revealed that his daughter Lucia can’t stand his singing.

He said, “I have a little girl who has two fathers and three brothers – she is two years old – and she knows it.

“She knows. She doesn’t snap her fingers yet, but she will soon.”

Ricky added, “She runs the house.

The other day she loved ‘Cocomelon’ so I sing with her in Cocomelon. And she says, ‘No, no, Daddy – no, stop it. Hold hold hold. ‘ And I said, ‘Let me sing, I want to sing.’ “No, no, papa. No no no no.'”

Meanwhile, Ricky recently announced that he had been reviewing his children’s mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Although he felt “fear” at the height of the pandemic last year, he made sure to talk to his brood to make sure they weren’t feeling the same way.

He said, “My family has been great and I’ve been looking for my kids all the time just to make sure they don’t feel the fear that I was, to be honest. But they were in a really good place.” . “

Hope Lodge elevating cash to reopen for households of most cancers sufferers

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again. “Giving Hope a Home.” That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment. “This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas. She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer. Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer. “We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.” Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress. “There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.” The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen. “So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright. He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back. “It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.” The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help now by donating here.

Fighting cancer can be even more difficult when you have to travel for treatment. For more than 20 years, the Kansas City Hope Lodge has provided patient families with free accommodation, but it is closed during the pandemic. They ask for the help of the community to open again.

“Giving Hope a Home.”

That is the promise of the Kansas City Hope Lodge, but during the pandemic it was unable to fulfill its mission of providing free housing to families of cancer patients traveling for treatment.

“This opportunity to come here made it so much easier,” said Sheryl Coppinger of Winchester, Kansas.

She has been to Hope Lodge in the past while her husband was being treated for cancer.

Since it is closed, they stay in a rental property for more than a month. She knows for others it’s longer.

“We met people who had been here for five months,” said Coppinger. “Without getting to Hope Lodge, I just don’t know how you would even get a chance to do what you had to do to fight and try to stay alive.”

Paying for accommodation is an added financial burden for families already struggling with soaring bills and stress.

“There are so many patients, nearly 4,000 a year, who come here to access Hope Lodge,” said Jeff Wright, who works with cancer patients in the Kansas City area and helped raise funds to reopen the lodge collect. “In order not to have it open today, they will have to spend their own money to stay in another hotel or find an apartment.”

The lodge closed in March 2020, with concerns about immunocompromised patients and dwindling resources. The lodge costs approximately $ 600,000 per year to operate, including staff and operating costs. The American Cancer Society has yet to raise $ 30,000 to reopen.

“So many patients, so many families. We have to open it, ”said Wright.

He said he looked forward to welcoming the families back.

“It will be one of the best days of my whole year,” he said. “Getting to a center where you have so much hope is what we need.”

The aim is to reopen Hope Lodge at the beginning of summer. You can help through now donate here.