The Phelps issue: Kalisz claims return journey to Olympics | Leisure

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) – Despite retiring from swimming five years ago, the influence of Michael Phelps was felt on the opening night of the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Chase Kalisz, who says Phelps is like a big brother, got himself another trip to the Olympics by winning the 400m individual medley on Sunday.

A hooded Phelps then cheered him on from the socially distant stands sauntered onto the deck to hug his former training partner at the North Baltimore Aquatic Club.

“Michael supports me a lot,” said Kalisz. “He’ll give me a kick in the butt when I need it, and sometimes I need it. Michael was an older brother to me in my life. I remember interacting with Michael when I was 6 years old – and here we are 21 years later. “

Phelps was impressed with Kalisz’s performance.

“His back half was great,” Phelps told the Associated Press. “I thought he might go a little faster. But he’ll be there soon. He took care of what he had to do. “

On the women’s side, the Americans had offspring: 19-year-old Emma Weyant prevailed against three Olympic veterans in her first tests and won an exciting 400 IM.

Another Olympic rookie, Kieran Smith, cut his previous personal best by almost 3 seconds to win the 400 freestyle and take his place for Tokyo.

Kalisz was halfway behind the top qualifier Carson Foster after the butterfly and backstroke course.

But Kalisz took the lead in the breaststroke and held it through the freestyles to the end, winning in 4 minutes, 9.09 seconds.

“I know where to be to get away from the breaststroke,” said the 27-year-old.

Phelps, who retired in 2016 after winning a record 23 gold medals in the Olympics, said everyone at the trials should get a boost from racing in front of fans.

USA Swimming allowed around 50% capacity in the 14,000-seat arena, with many of the empty seats filled with cardboard cutouts.

After more than a year without fans in the stands, the atmosphere for the swimmers was still a welcome change.

“You get that power from the fans,” said Phelps. “I got goosebumps when I entered the arena tonight.”

Another 2016 Olympian, Jay Litherland, followed Foster over the last 25 meters and took the expected second place on the Olympic team in 4: 10.33.

Foster finished third in 4: 10.86 – outside of the Olympic Games.

This ensured that some veterans would be the first swimmers to grab spots on the squad that will travel with high expectations to the Tokyo games delayed by the pandemic.

Kalisz took silver in the 400 IM at the Rio Olympics while Litherland finished fifth in that event.

Kalisz swam over to hug Litherland after seeing them finish 1-2. Both attended the University of Georgia and are still training together.

“It means the world to have my training partner with me,” said Kalisz.

The pandemic-related Olympics turned out to be a blessing for Kalisz, who hadn’t even qualified for the final of the 400 IM at the 2019 World Championships. He was struggling with a shoulder injury and was clearly not in full force.

An additional year of training was just what he needed before he could take on the grueling 400 IM on exams.

“I would definitely say that,” said Kalisz. “I don’t want to say that last year I wasn’t prepared because I was. But I’m 27. My body needs a lot more rest than ever before. “

Practically in sync with the top 4 In the final round of the 400 women’s IMs, Weyant touched first in 4: 33.81.

Hali Flickinger secured the probable second place for Tokyo with 4: 33.96, while Melanie Margalis (4: 34.08) and Leah Smith (4: 34.55) just missed out.

They set the four fastest times in the world that year, a testament to America’s strength and depth among women.

Weyant said her strategy is, “Stick to my race schedule and don’t worry about everyone around me. Stick to my strengths and always take them home with you when doing freestyle. “

Flickinger, Margalis, and Smith were on the U.S. Olympic team in 2016, but Weyant defeated them all.

“I’m not going to lie,” said the teenager. “I was really nervous so I tried to get that out of my system (in the morning preliminary round). Tonight’s plan was just to race. “

Kieran Smith’s Olympic debut will also be his first time with the national team.

He won in 3: 44.86 but knows that he has to be even faster to get a medal – especially against a strong Australian squad.

Reigning Olympic gold medalist Mack Horton drove a faster time than Smith in his country’s trials, and it wasn’t even good enough to make it onto the Australian team.

“I’m really excited about this swim,” said Smith, who had a best time to date of 3: 47.71. “I’m looking forward to hopefully improving this swim and being competitive with the rest of the world.”

No one else in the eight-man final was fast enough to meet the qualifying time for Tokyo.

Sunday too Michael Andrew has set two American records in the 100th breaststroke, 58.19 in the preliminary rounds in the morning and even faster – 58.14 – in the evening semi-finals.

He will be the clear favorite in the final on Monday.

“There’s a lot left in the tank,” said Andrew. “Maybe I tried too hard with the lights and cameras to go home. Hopefully I can fix that tomorrow. “

Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at https://twitter.com/pnewberry1963 You can find his work at https://apnews.com/search/paulnewberry

More AP Olympic coverage: https://www.apnews.com/OlympicGames and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at [email protected] or on Twitter @stacyryburn.

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at sryburn@nwadg.com or on Twitter @stacyryburn.