Denmark’s Nielsen excited to deliver athletic, aggressive type to CFL

TORONTO – Steven Nielsen grew up in Denmark and played a number of sports such as soccer and handball, but he also didn’t like to play. Then came football and everything changed.

His brother started playing and after watching him for a year, Nielsen decided to immerse himself in himself.

“I just fell in love with the sport,” said Nielsen. “I was finally able to use my size and my aggressiveness. Then, as I continued to play, I fell more and more in love with the sport and learned the various techniques, games, schemes and the like. “

Nielsen played at club level for a few years for fun. But at the age of 17 he started looking for schools in the US to make a career out of the sport he loved.

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The offensive lineman Steven Nielsen was able to successfully switch from Denmark to the NCAA. (Athletics in Eastern Michigan)

He ended up in Indiana at La Lumiere High School, where he was able to switch to an NCAA program.

“It was difficult, more on a personal basis, just to be that far from my family,” he said. “Practice too. We practiced at home twice a week, and when I was in prep school we practiced every day and exercised in the morning. So there was a lot more training and football during the day than I was used to. That was a big transition and it helped me prepare for college.

Nielsen eventually signed up to play Eastern Michigan, where he would spend his entire college career. He says it felt like home as soon as he walked onto campus.

During his time with the Eagles, the 6-foot-8, 307-pounder played across the offensive line. He originally played tackle coming up but was used as a freshman on the left. He played the correct tackle in his sophomore and sophomore years before the team moved him again, this time to leave the tackle for his senior season.

While moving around so often has been a challenge, Nielsen has also learned immensely from those opportunities and says he is better off now.

His final college season was in 2019. After leaving Eastern Michigan, Nielsen was signed by the Jacksonville Jaguars as an unoccupied free agent. Unfortunately he has been cut and trained since then.

Nielsen has always been a fan of the CFL game and last year he was looking into the possibility of going to the Global Combine but he was still focused on the NFL and not participating. However, this year he will be looking to make it north of the border and is looking forward to the chance to qualify for one of the nine CFL franchises.

“That would be huge,” said Nielsen of the prospect of being drafted. “Just for the development of football in Denmark, just to have another professional player. I think it is a great opportunity to keep that notoriety for the Danish players so that young people feel that it is possible. No matter where it is, you can play professional football. “

As a big body who can play across the board – not to mention occupying a global spot on a CFL roster in a key position like the offensive line – Nielsen should be able to do what he learned in college to bring in and expand his skills once he’s come to Canada.

“On the field you would get a very athletic, tall man who can move and knows how to take blockers and dominate people,” said Nielsen. “As a team player, you get someone who is very motivating and hardworking, and someone who is always there for your teammates.

“… I enjoy run blocking the most because you can beat someone. Pass blocking, you need to be a little more patient. But even in college, I liked to take the aggressiveness to pass the block. I used to go straight for guys. I now understand that this will be a little more difficult because they are a little further away from me now. But hopefully I can bring this aggressiveness to the passing game. “

Some Abilene residents, enterprise homeowners excited for potential downtown leisure district | KTAB

Posted: Apr 6, 2021 / 5:03 PM CDT
Updated: April 6, 2021 / 5:10 p.m. CDT

ABILENE, Texas (KTAB / KRBC) – Abilene could get an open container entertainment district in the city center That would allow adults to walk from restaurants to shops with an alcoholic drink in hand.

Some Abilene residents and business owners say they wholeheartedly support this.

“I think it’s a great idea,” said Kayla Rollins, owner of the K. Ellis Boutique.

“It’s exciting to revitalize downtown and bring new life to it,” said Brenna Camp, a local resident.

Abilene City Council approves the task force to consider a proposal that would allow people to carry alcohol around downtown

“As long as residents are responsible for it and throw away their trash,” said Jonathan Dempsey, local resident.

“We’re excited to have the chance to see more people downtown,” said Jessica Adams, owner of Vagabond Pizza.

The idea of ​​a downtown entertainment district began after two businessmen reached out to Councilor Weldon Hurt.

“Anything a citizen brings up, good or bad, whatever we have to do, I generally bring it up to the city administrator,” Hurt said.

The proposal at the Abilene City Council meeting could allow alcohol to be carried while walking downtown

After talking to Robert Hanna, the manager of Abilene City, they decided to take the idea to the council.

“First and foremost, we don’t encourage people to get drunk,” said Hurt.

Instead, the aim is to make the city center more attractive and more accessible for residents and tourists.

“It really doesn’t cost the city anything, and I still think it will help tourism, and I always consider tourism to be free money,” said Hurt.

Rollins says an entertainment district would attract more shoppers.

“Like Fredericksburg, we go out and spend all day, my husband can come and we can shop, and he can sit there and follow us, but he has a beer and is happy about it,” Rollins said.

Instead of going to a shop or restaurant, people can make a day out of it.

Some reviewers have said it could create more trash, but Rollins and Adams say they would be willing to bring out more trash cans.

“We all know that if we screw it up, it affects more than just our business. That is why we are all very hardworking. We want to take care of this community, that’s why we are here, ”said Adams.

Hurt says keeping young professionals in Abilene has always been a goal, and an entertainment district could do just that.

“Give them more places to go, more things to see,” said Hurt.

Nothing has been decided yet, but the city council will appoint members to a task force which will then discuss options and possibilities with the city administrator, city attorney and other city guides.

Stay leisure venues excited to welcome company again

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (KTXL) – It’s been a long and quiet 13 months for the owner and operator of Harlow’s in Sacramento.

“I never thought it could go away,” said Jim Cornett. “Who would have thought we might lose live entertainment.”

The building has remained empty except for the few times that Cornett let some bands use the facility for free live streaming shows.

But the empty booths will again be filled with enthusiastic fans.

“It’s been a very exciting day for us,” Cornett told FOX40.

Starting April 15, California will allow indoor live events and performances, gatherings, receptions, and conferences. How many people are admitted depends on the risk level of the district.

California allows indoor events starting April 15th

Because Sacramento County is in the red zone, indoor concerts and performances can have 10% capacity for venues of up to 1,500 people.

If all guests are tested or provide evidence of full vaccination, capacity can increase to 25%.

However, for many companies like Harlow’s, reopening quickly is not easy.

“If you can tell us we can open up today, we’re three months away from our first show,” said Cornett.

Richard Lewis, President and CEO of Broadway Sacramento, says Friday’s announcement is a good move. But the newly released guidelines won’t make him change the much anticipated start date for “Hamilton”.

“Two hundred people have gathered – I can’t pay for ‘Hamilton’ with 200 people,” said Lewis. “I need 2,100. September 15th. We have ‘Hamilton’. We got it for four weeks. “

Both Lewis and Cornett are confident that the state is moving in the right direction. They hope to rock and roll past the Tier system in a few months.

“It’s just a great experience – live entertainment,” said Cornett.

Cornett adds that he hopes to reopen Harlows in June. At this point, he’s hoping Sacramento County is in the orange or yellow row.

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Derby faculty superintendent enthusiastic about potentialities for federal stimulus cash

DERBY – The increase in federal funding for schools makes it “an exciting time to be in education,” said school principal Matthew Conway

The administration is still debating how best to use the funds and identifying the needs of students and staff, with an emphasis on academics, family and community relationships, school safety, social emotional wellbeing, and technology.

Twenty percent goes to longer study days and summer programs, but from there Conway sees the funding as a great opportunity for change.

“Keep saying we could do things differently if we had the money. Well, we have the money. That’s the damn exciting thing about it,” he said.

The federal aid packages that are being used to pump money into schools – the American rescue plan and the emergency fund for elementary and secondary schools – are designed to help districts recover from the aftermath of the pandemic and find a way forward.

Derby public schools’ share of the American Rescue Plan is $ 4.5 million in addition to the $ 1.7 million from ESSER.

That cash boost for all Connecticut public schools is roughly 31/2 times the state aid they would receive in a typical fiscal year.

Cities also get a pot of federal aid through these packages, with the city valued at around $ 3.6 million.

Conway said the hard question is what a new path will look like.

The schools have two years to spend the funds. These contain usage terms and conditions and add to the operating budget so Derby cannot use them for typical ongoing expenses.

Furthermore, as districts in the state and the country vie for the same resources, some will lose, he said.

“That’s the exact reason we can’t see this going out and hiring because it’s not a sustainable approach,” he said. “That’s why you have to rethink what you will do with the funding and how you can best influence learning in the long term. It doesn’t mean hiring short-term support – it’s about better ways to deliver learning for today and for the future. “

Although millions of dollars have already been spent filling performance gaps and improving the curriculum, Derby and others haven’t seen big improvements, Conway said, but it’s not the teachers’ fault.

There are systemic and external factors at play that go beyond what curricula and learning models can take into account, he said.

“You have to look outside the classroom,” said Conway. “You need to get the wider community involved in these discussions and what you can do to influence them.”

If the district can find a way to use its resources to address the external factors, they will be better positioned to have long-term impact, he said.

“Instead of just having a ‘if’ conversation, we have a real opportunity to do so,” he said.

Derby schools were full in person this school year, and with the administration considering how to distribute the money, Conway wants to hear from the students about how their school year went.

He wants to create an essay contest across grade levels in which they describe what they experienced so that the district can better understand their needs.

Conway expects some of these funds to be spent by the summer, particularly to support accelerated learning across grade levels.

mdignan@hearstmediact.com

DERBY – The $ 6.2 million one-time federal funding raised to Derby schools makes it an “exciting time to be in education,” said principal Matthew Conway.

The administration is still debating how best to use the funds, identifying the needs of students and staff, focusing on academics, family and community relationships, school safety, social emotional wellbeing, and technology.

Twenty percent goes to longer study days and summer programs, but from there Conway sees the funding as a great opportunity for change.

“Keep saying we could do things differently if we had the money – now we have the money. That’s what’s so damn exciting about it, ”he said.

The federal aid packages that are being used to pump money into schools – the American rescue plan and the emergency fund for elementary and secondary schools – are designed to help districts recover from the aftermath of the pandemic and find a way forward.

Derby public schools’ share of the American Rescue Plan is $ 4.5 million in addition to the $ 1.7 million from ESSER.

The increase in the amount of money for all Connecticut public schools is approximately 3.5 times the state aid they would receive in a typical fiscal year.

Cities are also getting a pot of federal aid through the same packages, with the city valued at around $ 3.6 million.

The schools have two years to spend the funds. These contain usage terms and conditions and add to the operating budget so Derby cannot use them for typical ongoing expenses.

Furthermore, as districts in the state and the country vie for the same resources, some will lose, he said.

“That’s the exact reason we can’t see this going out and hiring because it’s not a sustainable approach,” he said. “That’s why you have to rethink what you will do with the funding and how you can best influence learning in the long term. It doesn’t mean hiring short-term support – it’s about better ways to deliver learning for today and for the future. “

Although millions of dollars are already being used to fill performance gaps and improve the curriculum, Derby and others haven’t seen big improvements, Conway said, but it’s not the teachers’ fault.

There are systemic and external factors at play that go beyond what curricula and learning models can take into account, he said.

“You have to look outside the classroom,” said Conway. “You need to get the wider community involved in these discussions and what you can do to influence them.”

If the district can find a way to use its one-time funding to address the external factors, it will be better positioned to have long-term impact, he said.

“Instead of just having a ‘if’ conversation, we have a real opportunity to do so,” he said.

Derby schools were full in person this school year, and with the administration considering how to distribute the money, Conway wants to hear from the students about how their school year went.

He said he would run an essay contest across grade levels so that students and parents describe what they experienced so that the district can better understand their needs.

Conway said he expects to spend some of the funds by the summer, particularly to support accelerated learning across grade levels.

mdignan@hearstmediact.com

Rochester Arts and Leisure Excited to Reopen in April

ROCHESTER, NY – The arts and entertainment venue may reopen with capacity restrictions starting next month.

“It’s fantastic news for us in the performing arts industry,” said Curtis Long, President and CEO of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra.

What you need to know

  • Event Spaces, Arts and Entertain can be opened from April 2nd
  • Venues can be 33% full, or up to 100 people indoors and up to 200 people outdoors
  • If guests test COVID-19 negative, the capacity can be increased to up to 150 people indoors and up to 500 people indoors
  • People must adhere to social distancing guidelines, and face covering is still required

Performances have been held virtually since the pandemic began, but will likely take place again at the Eastman Theater in Rochester this week under new guidance from the governor.

“We’re excited to have the opportunity to play again for a live audience during the orchestra, either indoors or outdoors,” Long said. “Yesterday’s announcement made it possible for one of these things to happen in April.”

The venues can operate at 33% capacity, or up to 100 people indoors and up to 200 people outdoors.

If guests test COVID-19 negative, the capacity can be increased to up to 150 people indoors and up to 500 people indoors.

The announcement is exciting for Comedy on the Carlson but is waiting for final confirmation after a false start last year. The comedy club says it reopened briefly in the summer but has closed due to changes in state guidelines.

“We’re 98% sure we can do this. We just need the Alcohol Board’s okay and we can get going on April 2nd,” said Mark Ippolito, director of operations of comedy at Carlson.

Right now, comedy safety is a top priority at Carlson.

“We want people to feel safe when they come here. We want them to know that they are safe when they come here. Come here, they will come to other places here in the city and that will only boost the economy, “added Ippolito.

It will be a hopeful boost for Rochester, known for its arts, culture and entertainment scenes.

“As long as all of these venues and entertainment venues choose to act responsibly and provide safe spaces for everything, it’s going to work great,” said Ippolito.

While the venues are allowed to open next month, people must adhere to social distancing guidelines and face coverings are still required.

Leisure venues excited to supply concessions once more | Information

Indoor restaurant capacity is now capped at 25 percent, but around 40 percent of establishments across the state choose not to reopen because it just isn’t sustainable.

But restaurants weren’t the only businesses to see change on Monday. Entertainment venues can now offer concessions again.

The local owners hope this will boost business.

“It’s pretty emotional,” said Wendy Sebert, owner of Candlelite Sports, as we were open. “

Sebert said it has been a long time been able to service concessions and it has been difficult to open their doors without them.

“It cost us money to be honest,” she said. “I mean, we don’t make any money bowling at all.”

Even so, she kept her doors open because she loved what she did.

“I don’t want to close. My heart is here,” said Sebert.

Bowling alleys aren’t the only entertainment options that are now allowed to offer concessions.

The owner of the Vassar Theater said he was glad that moviegoers could finally drop the microwave popcorn.

“We are very excited,” said Andreas Fuchs. “I said yesterday we were popping for joy. You have the big popper; it’s sure to hit the microwave popcorn.”

Cinemas, like bowling, earn most of their money with concessions.

“Popcorn and pop and concessions are certainly very important to the bottom line,” said Fuchs. “They are frankly more important than the films.”

Both Sebert and Fuchs say they commit to following MDHHS guidelines because it depends on keeping their doors open.