Your Type: Emily Filos | Publish Bulletin

“When you have a ‘conversation piece,’ kids are a little safer when it comes to walking up to the library or just about your outfit and asking questions,” she said.

Emily Filos for Your Style July 16, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

Emily’s second title is that of visual artist. She said it was partly a hobby, partly a job, depending on her motivation.

“Most of the time when I work, I scribble animals and fantasy creatures on scratch paper and leave them there for colleagues to find – graffiti with little effect.”



While she’s a big fan of black for her clothing, Emily has a strong penchant for plaids, rainbow stripes, and colorful flair – all enhanced by a glowing nod to the early 2000s.

Describe your style.

I just wear what feels right every day, although I especially like things that are decorated with flowers, bugs or unnecessary metal eyelets. In autumn I always end up as a full-fledged skater girl, wearing a tied jacket, fingerless gloves, Converse and band tees. (I’ve never been on a skateboard before.)

How does your job affect your clothes?

I wear a lot of black, but on days when I work in the children’s area, I attach particular importance to a bright color or a fun design.

Whose style do you admire and why?

From a celebrity point of view, I admire people who can rock an “edgy” personality, but still look cute when they feel like it. I think of Lil Nas X and Remington Leith from the band Palaye Royale.

Which colors and patterns do you tend to most often?

Anyone who has known me for more than a week could probably answer that. I love black, white, and red and checks that include all three. However, I usually add a few rainbow stripes for flavor when wearing black.

What is your favorite decade in terms of fashion?

I can’t deny that I tend towards the 00s in my own wardrobe, but really every era has some cool style elements that are worth incorporating.

Thoughts on today’s fashion scene?

I think everyone in my age group is a little concerned right now about how the worst bits of ’90s fashion are coming back to haunt us, but half of my wardrobe is straight out of Hot Topic, so who should I judge?

Article is worth it?

Get thick, comfy, cute socks that will last a while.

Emily Filos for Your Style July 16, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

Emily Filos for Your Style July 16, 2021. (Ken Klotzbach / kklotzbach@postbulletin.com)

What was your best thrift find?

Years ago I found an amazing six pocket knee length brown skirt; it was basically cargo shorts in the shape of a skirt.

The best clothes purchase you’ve ever made?

I think I have to mention my holographic raincoat. You won’t believe how many total strangers stopped me on the sidewalk, in the supermarket, in the parking lot just to ask me where I got this coat from. People leaned out of moving vehicles to tell me they like my raincoat!

The most sentimental item you have?

A bracelet that I got at home at an art fair (shoutout to Decadence Jewelry). It’s just a small brass bracelet with the number “515” engraved on it, because that’s the area code for the part of Iowa I’m from and the number of my old library and town hall in my hometown.

Fill in the blank: I feel best when wearing _____.

An outfit with a related theme, be it a color spectrum or repeating pattern, or just a general mood. That’s the artist in me – I’m more concerned with the aesthetics of the outfit itself than with functionality or what it actually looks like on me.

Tips to say goodbye?

Don’t feel obliged to hold onto things that you no longer feel comfortable with, but don’t be afraid to hold onto something “out of date” that you really love, either.

Jeanette Caban has her finger on the pulse of fashion. See her work in the Post Bulletin twice a month. Do you know someone who has a special style? Send nominations to life@postbulletin.com with “Your Style” in the subject.

Emily Blunt has a accountability ‘to enlighten folks’ about stuttering | Leisure

Emily Blunt believes her “job is to educate people” about stuttering as someone who made it into Hollywood.

The 38-year-old English actress grew up stuttering and is now involved with the American Institute of Stuttering, which she says has given her a “real sense of purpose” as she sees it as her duty to explain to people exactly how it goes a stutter develops.

When asked about her commitment to the organization, she said: “I feel that I have a real goal with this foundation because it is so personal to me. I understand the agony these children and adults go through.

“There is a lot of misinformation about stuttering, so it’s my job to educate people about what it is about; that it is not fearful, it is not that you have intellectual disabilities, and it is not that you are nervous. It is neurological, it is genetic and no one can be to blame – and there is nothing children can do about it. “

Emily has “so much empathy” for those who are still struggling with stuttering and said she wants to encourage others to love this part of their personality.

The ‘Mary Poppins Returns’ star added, “I have so much empathy for her. It’s also the kind of thing that you can’t explain to people because you can’t speak. You’re completely trapped in it. I find it incredibly moving so I tell the kids and parents who call me that all you have to do is learn to put your arms around this part of yourself. You have to learn that it’s not your whole, it’s just a part of you and everyone has something to do with.

“I love the fact that I’ve never met a mean stutterer. Once you’ve been humiliated, you won’t do it to anyone. Ever. “

In addition to empowering others, Emily has also spent most of the last year homeschooling her two daughters – Hazel, 7 and Violet, 4 – who she has with her husband, John Krasinski.

And the A Quiet Place Part II star said she appreciated the downtime she was able to spend with her brood amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Talk to OK! Magazine, she said, “We’d try to dig our way through home schooling like everyone else – but I think that time at home gave people an opportunity to notice every detail of your children.”

Emily Ratajkowski at all times breastfeeding her child | Leisure

Emily Ratajkowski always “breastfeeds” her baby.

Hitmaker ‘We Are Your Friends’ welcomed their child into the world six weeks ago and she joked about the demands of motherhood when she shared a snap on social media.

She wrote on Instagram: “If it looks like I’m always breastfeeding, it’s because I am.”

Emily recently announced that she “never really understood” what it is like to have a family before getting pregnant and insisted that she felt “really happy” about having a baby.

She said, “I never really understood what it would be like to have a family and growing a family is an amazing experience that opens my eyes and I feel really happy.

“I obviously don’t know what motherhood is going to be like because this is my first time and everyone has such different experiences and perspectives. So the best thing is to just trust the process and take each day at once and then see where I’m going.” this journey leads. “

However, Emily previously admitted that she found pregnancy “lonely”.

She explained, “My husband likes to say ‘we are pregnant’. I tell him that the feeling, while sweet, is not entirely true. I disagree that his entire family’s DNA is in me, but mine DNA not in me is him. “It just seems unfair,” I say, and we both laugh. It’s kind of a joke, but there’s the truth behind it. Pregnancy is inherently lonely, it’s something a woman does being alone in her body does no matter what your circumstances may be. Although I have a loving partner and many girlfriends willing to share the details of your pregnancy, I am ultimately alone with my body in this experience. “