English Cottage design fashion, impressed by Cotswolds, was embraced in Lancaster [architecture column] | Structure

LANCASTER IN STYLE, PART 21: ENGLISH COTTAGE STYLE, 1920-40

Adorable is an adjective we don’t often associate with any architectural style, but it is the perfect description for English Cottage. As one of the various styles of the interwar period, the English Cottage developed between 1920 and 1940 as an affordable option for the popular Tudor Mansion movement.

The English Cottage, described as cozy and comfortable, is characterized by flat roof lines and the occasionally steep “cat slide” gable.

Exterior materials are combinations of stone, brick, and stucco; Windows are wings that reflect their European “out-swing” heritage. The one- and two-story buildings are modeled on the cottages of the Cotswolds in England and are often set between trees and flower gardens with an arched front door. The tall, stacked chimneys often appear at the front entrance, creating a unique silhouette and skyline for passers-by.

This English cottage-style house has nested gables, a steep sloping roof, and dormer windows and casement windows.

Built around 1928 in a wooded setting on Wilson Drive, this English cottage-style home features a slate roof, classic dormer windows and a stone fireplace.

HG English Cottage 1 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style home features old peasant brickwork, cast stone Tudor arch, rare stone torches above the entrance, a cat sunroof, a tapered chimney and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 4 D 9 Paul Myer's Residence 1.jpg

This vintage photograph shows a house built for Paul Myer on Marietta Avenue around 1928. Henry Y. Shaub was the architect of this English cottage-style house with a wooden porch, stone veneer and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 5Paul Myer's Residence Architecture D9.jpg

This photo shows a residence built for Paul Myer around 1928. This English cottage style home is in a wooded setting on Marietta Avenue in Lancaster.

HG English Cottage 6 D9 Archtecture.jpg

This English cottage on Jackson Drive has a slate roof, stone and stucco facade, and a flared eaves at the entrance.

HG English Cottage 7 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage-style house, built around 1928 on Wilson Drive, has a stone facade, dormer windows, an arched chimney off the main entrance, a cat sunroof, and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 8 D9 Sears Catalog Architecture.jpg

The Mitchell was a 1928 English cottage style house that you could see in an artist rendering in the Sears & Roebuck catalog. It was advertised for $ 2,122 and had a tall chimney and cat-slide gable at the entrance.

HG English Cottage 10 D9 Architecture.jpg

Architect Melvin R. Evans designed this English cottage-style house in 1929 with steep roof lines, stacked chimneys next to the arched brick entrance and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 11 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage style house goes well with his garden on Wheatland Avenue in Lancaster. It features a slate roof, stacked chimneys, a flat dormer window, casement windows, a stone facade, and tile accents,

HG English Cottage 12 D9 Architecture the Cotswolds.jpg

The Cotswalds region of southern England has stone cottages with tiled roofs, dormers, rose-clad walls and extensive gardens.

HG English Cottage 13 D9 The Cotswolds Architecture.jpg

Located in the Cotswalds, southern England, this cottage has a thatched roof, dormer window and gardens.

HG English Cottage 14 D9 Architecture.jpg

This house in Glen Moore Circle won the Lancaster New Era 1923 Prize Home Contest. Designed by architect Henry Y. Shaub, it is in the English cottage style, with a stucco facade, wooden veranda brackets and a cat sunroof.

HG English Cottage 15 D9 Architecture.jpg

1926 Edgar Hess Willow Street Pike Henry Shaub Architect Details include dormers, cat sliding gables, casement windows and arched entrance 1

HG Englitsh Cottage 2 Architecture D9.jpg

Built prior to 1928 for James G. Haller, this English cottage-style house features a distinctive chimney off the entrance, flat dormer windows, and an arched entrance with wrought iron belt hinges.




HG English Cottage 3 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style house has nested gables, a steep sloping roof, and dormer windows and casement windows.




Built around 1928 in a wooded setting on Wilson Drive, this English cottage-style home features a slate roof, classic dormer windows and a stone fireplace.




HG English Cottage 1 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style home features old peasant brickwork, cast stone Tudor arch, rare stone torches above the entrance, a cat sunroof, a tapered chimney and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 4 D 9 Paul Myer's Residence 1.jpg

This vintage photograph shows a house built for Paul Myer on Marietta Avenue around 1928. Henry Y. Shaub was the architect of this English cottage-style house with a wooden porch, stone veneer and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 5Paul Myer's Residence Architecture D9.jpg

This photo shows a residence built for Paul Myer around 1928. This English cottage style home is in a wooded setting on Marietta Avenue in Lancaster.




HG English Cottage 6 D9 Archtecture.jpg

This English cottage on Jackson Drive has a slate roof, stone and stucco facade, and a flared eaves at the entrance.




HG English Cottage 7 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage-style house, built around 1928 on Wilson Drive, has a stone facade, dormer windows, an arched chimney off the main entrance, a cat sunroof, and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 8 D9 Sears Catalog Architecture.jpg

The Mitchell was a 1928 English cottage style house that you could see in an artist rendering in the Sears & Roebuck catalog. It was advertised for $ 2,122 and had a tall chimney and cat-slide gable at the entrance.




HG English Cottage 10 D9 Architecture.jpg

Architect Melvin R. Evans designed this English cottage-style house in 1929 with steep roof lines, stacked chimneys next to the arched brick entrance and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 11 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage style house goes well with his garden on Wheatland Avenue in Lancaster. It features a slate roof, stacked chimneys, a flat dormer window, casement windows, a stone facade, and tile accents,




HG English Cottage 12 D9 Architecture the Cotswolds.jpg

The Cotswalds region of southern England has stone cottages with tiled roofs, dormers, rose-clad walls and extensive gardens.




HG English Cottage 13 D9 The Cotswolds Architecture.jpg

Located in the Cotswalds, southern England, this cottage has a thatched roof, dormer window and gardens.




HG English Cottage 14 D9 Architecture.jpg

This house in Glen Moore Circle won the Lancaster New Era 1923 Prize Home Contest. Designed by architect Henry Y. Shaub, it is in the English cottage style, with a stucco facade, wooden veranda brackets and a cat sunroof.




HG English Cottage 15 D9 Architecture.jpg

1926 Edgar Hess Willow Street Pike Henry Shaub Architect Details include dormers, cat sliding gables, casement windows and arched entrance 1




HG Englitsh Cottage 2 Architecture D9.jpg

Built prior to 1928 for James G. Haller, this English cottage-style house features a distinctive chimney off the entrance, flat dormer windows, and an arched entrance with wrought iron belt hinges.

The English cottage style uses the “dormer” detail to shorten the overall height of the building and provide more floor space on the second floor. The dormer closes flush with the outer wall and breaks through the eaves, whereby the

Signature effect.

Elements made of heavy wooden beams and consoles, especially on the porches, additionally reinforce a medieval connection. The style’s popularity continued to grow when mail order companies such as Sears & Roebuck offered complete English Cottage house kits for $ 1,500 in the 1920s and 30s.

Interestingly, a parallel style called the Storybook Style developed in Hollywood, California, transforming the English Cottage into a fairytale-like appearance with whimsical roof lines, crooked doors and windows, and in some cases thatched roofs.

Lancaster Architects C. Emlen Urban, James H. Warner,

Henry Y. Shaub and Melvern R. Evans quickly embraced the English Cottage style and added it to their growing portfolio. There are exceptional examples of this quaint style across the county, particularly to the west of the city. The style is now over 100 years old and nature has worked its magic to bring the “delightful” cottages into their perfect setting.

What are the interwar styles?

The styles that developed between WWI and WWII were English Cottage, French, Dutch, and Spanish Revival.

What is a Cat Slide Gable?

It is effectively a regular gable roof with one side that goes deeper to the ground. The name comes from the idea that a cat thrown on the roof will “slide” to the ground.

Why don’t we see thatched roofs in Lancaster County?

The thatched roof requires a very steep roof of over 45 degrees to quickly drain away water and snow. In addition, handicrafts and materials for roof assembly would have to be imported from Europe.

Contributing to this column is Gregory J. Scott, FAIA, a local architect with more than four decades of national experience in innovation and design. He is a member of the College of Fellows at the American Institute of Architects. E-mail GScott@rlps.com.

Success! An email has been sent with a link to confirm the list subscription.

Error! An error occurred while processing your request.

Don Brown’s ‘direct, pointed’ teaching model embraced by Arizona Wildcat protection

With an entire unit to oversee, Defense Coordinator Don Brown doesn’t have time to hold all hands as he tries to prepare Arizona for each week’s new opponent. And his players are glad he doesn’t either.

“I like the way Coach Brown trains, I like this tough coaching,” Defensive Tackle Trevon Mason said last week. “He doesn’t care where you are, he doesn’t care if you are the star player, he will attack you, especially if you screw it up. Everyone needs that, I think. “

Brown made massive upgrades to his defense in his first year with Arizona, which has been in the bottom third of the Pac-12 in yards per game every year since 2014. In 2019 and 2020, the Wildcats were the dead last defense and scoring defense.

Arizona is still last in the conference on defense at 31.8 points per game, but that’s eight points better than a year ago and the yards allowed are even better. The Wildcats allow 381.3 yards per game, the fifth best in the conference, compared to 473 in 2020.

For 65-year-old Brown, who comes from the old school but still comes into contact with today’s players, his approach is simple: be honest and direct.

“They criticize the performance, not the actor,” Brown said on Tuesday. “It’s direct, it’s pointed. And I think that’s one of my strengths, I’m awesome. If I think something needs to be said, I will say it directly. “

Linebacker Jerry Roberts says Brown is “locked up” and “intense” during games, going through every play of the previous drive with the defense when they hit the sideline. If something has gone wrong, he will respond, but not single out individual sources of error.

“He criticizes the performance as a whole,” said Roberts. “For example, let’s say I go out there and give up a 50 yard touchdown. But he will not necessarily criticize me, he will criticize the entire defense. What could we have done better as a defense if we weren’t just concentrating on the individual? “

That’s not to say Brown doesn’t build close relationships with his players. That just happens not during training and games.

“If you’re out there practicing for two hours, you don’t have time to say, ‘Hey, come here and let’s hug,'” he said.

Brown used the spring and summer to figure out how best to train each of his boys and worked this out for the regular season. From Linebacker Anthony Pandy, who leads Arizona in Tackles and had a pick-six against USC, he said he’s gotten so much better since spring thanks to the relationship they’ve built.

“There were times in the spring when I would have traded it for two used soccer balls,” said Brown. “But that is no longer the case. And it really is by and large because of its approach to the game. We have an honest relationship. I can promise you that. He just wants it. And he wants the truth. The nice thing is knowing that I can be honest with the guy, you don’t have to cover it with candy. He has a chance to take what you tell him and bring it to the field and make the necessary adjustments. His trajectory in the last few weeks has been like this. “

As for the defensive ending Jalen Harriswho’s just having a breakout year: “Another guy who was ready to be coached. This guy is a smart guy, he could read the information and he took it to the field. Now a lot of people can do it in the drilling job, but they cannot bring it to the field. This guy brings it to the field. “

safety Jaxen Turner, who admits he has trust issues, said a face-to-face conversation he had with Brown prior to the start of the season made a big difference in his game.

“With a new employee, you won’t believe everything they say at first sight,” he said. “I am now fully on board, 100 percent inside.”

Turner was disqualified twice for targeting, including early against USC. Rather than pissing him off for costing his team, Brown just made sure Turner knew he was playing right and that mistakes sometimes still happen.

“I don’t know what you’re doing with it,” Brown said, saying that aiming “could be the worst rule in college football. They coach the tackling every day, we coach posture, head positioning and all those things. I thought he was under him, but I’m not the officer who runs the rule. Did you look at the piece and say he did it on purpose? It’s an absolute no, the answer is of course not. But for me you just keep going I had a player (in Michigan, Khaleke Hudson) a few years ago who had games in a row (with targeting). Then it went away. It’s a tough, tough deal. “

Kat Graham embraced her pure curls in quarantine | Leisure

Kat Graham “hugged” her naturally curly hair in quarantine.

The ‘Vampire Diaries’ alum always had her locks hidden under wigs, but since moving home amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the actress has experimented with her locks, calling herself a near-curl expert.

Speaking to People magazine for her lovely edition, she said, “Hair has been a great trip to quarantine for me over the past year. I really hugged my locks, which I’ve never done before. I’ve relied on it really heavily straight wigs and the like. And now I’m finding ways to have looser curls, tighter curls, softer curls, stronger. I almost feel like a curling expert, I’m not quite there yet. “

Elsewhere, the 31-year-old singer announced that she learned how to apply makeup from her drag queen friends.

She shared, “When I started releasing more music, the only people who let me perform were gay clubs.

“So I used to go to the bar for free about two or three people, and then that became my community. When I started doing more press and more red carpets, the only make-up artists who did that I knew I meant Am friends so they did my makeup for the first press until they finally taught me how to make my own. “

Kat added how much she loved getting excited about the red carpet.

She said, “I would be the girl who would be the first on the carpet. I would just hurry to make a carpet. It’s a little silly now.”

In the meantime, the co-founder of Modern Nirvana spoke of the importance of “self-love”.

She said, “You have to get into this room of self-love. No matter how much work you do, if you don’t love yourself, if you haven’t really accepted yourself, the work will never end. You I’ll always find something you just want or if only I could have that and it will never be over. Give yourself the opportunity to heal. Because it takes a long time and you don’t know who to inspire if you just loved yourself. “