Covid vaccine boosters are actually out there. This is who’s eligible for Pfizer, Moderna and J&J’s pictures

A patient receives on 29.

Emily Elconin | Reuters

Nearly 100 million people across the country are immediately entitled to a Covid booster vaccination after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has additional doses of. have approved Modern and Johnson & Johnson‘s vaccines Thursday night.

The agency’s decision also allows fully immunized individuals to combine their booster vaccinations with doses from different manufacturers after research by the National Institutes of Health showed that combining and combining vaccines was safe and effective. Pfizer and BioNTech‘s boosters were largely released for use in the United States on September 24th.

About 11.6 million people across the country have already received their boosters, and CDC approvals have opened them up to tens of millions more people. But not everyone is eligible. Here’s who gets the extra doses in the U.S. based on their first round of shooting:

Pfizer-BioNTech

More than 47 million Pfizer vaccine recipients who received both vaccinations at least six months ago were eligible for a booster on Friday, according to data presented to the CDC’s advisory committee on Thursday. This contains:

  • Everyone who is 65 and older.
  • All adults between the ages of 18 and 64 who have cancer, dementia, diabetes, heart disease, HIV, and other conditions that make Covid complications more likely.
  • Anyone over the age of 18 who live or work in a long-term care facility, homeless shelter and prison or other community facility.
  • Frontline workers aged 18 and over who are at higher risk of Covid exposure due to their work, including first responders, teachers, supermarket workers and local transit workers.

Modern

According to the CDC presentation, more than 39.1 million Moderna vaccine recipients who received both vaccinations at least six months ago were able to receive a booster on Friday. The CDC has adopted the same criteria for Moderna recipients as Pfizer, as the two companies use the same mRNA technology in their Covid vaccines. They include.

  • Everyone who is 65 and older.
  • All adults between the ages of 18 and 64 who have cancer, dementia, diabetes, heart disease, HIV, and other conditions that make Covid complications more likely.
  • Anyone over the age of 18 who live or work in a long-term care facility, homeless shelter and prison or other community facility.
  • Frontline workers aged 18 and over who are at higher risk of Covid exposure due to their work, including first responders, teachers, supermarket workers and local transit workers.

Johnson & Johnson

The CDC has adopted slightly different criteria for J & J’s one-time Covid vaccine, making nearly 13 million recipients eligible as of Friday. This contains

  • All adults who were vaccinated with J & J’s Covid vaccine at least two months ago, instead of Pfizer and Moderna six months ago.
  • All adult J&J recipients are entitled to a booster vaccination, even if they do not have any underlying medical conditions or work or live in an occupation where there is a higher risk of Covid.

Venues nonetheless eligible for billions left in SBA grant cash

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WTVF) – For fifteen months the tables were empty and the stage at The 5 Spot in East Nashville was mostly quiet.

“It wasn’t just the owners who took a hit, it was a trickle-down effect,” said co-owner and general manager Travis Collinsworth. “All employees were unemployed, [and] the artists who play with us. “That’s one of the reasons why he chose the Small Business Administration Grant for operators of shuttered venues. “We received it about a month ago and are currently using it, yes,” he said.

Congress allocated $ 16 billion to the program. Due to technical issues, the launch in April was bumpy, but to date applicants have requested $ 12 billion of the $ 16 billion – meaning there is still $ 4 billion to be won.

“My actual application with the accompanying documents, you know, is an inch and a half thick. So it took a while to put all this stuff together,” said Collinsworth, holding up a folder of documents. He said that while the process was time consuming, it was clearly to be followed.

Theaters, live music venues, museums, and performing arts organizations are just a few of those that could potentially receive up to $ 10 million in grants. So far, the SBA has decided over 85% of the applications.

“We now have more resources to make sure everyone gets a little bit whole than they would have been,” said Collinsworth.

Venues that have already received cash but suffered a 70% loss in revenue may be able to re-enter the $ 4 billion pot for additional funding.

Collinsworth said it was something he was up to.

COVID-19 aid cash: Small companies eligible for $5K grants

Evers checks GOP bills that regulate the federal government’s COVID-19 expenditure

Small business support is on the way after Governor Tony Evers vetoed proposals by the Republican-controlled legislature to use federal aid.

Small business support is on the way after Governor Tony Evers vetoed proposals by the Republican-controlled legislature to use $ 3.2 billion in federal aid. A $ 420 million program announced Thursday, April 22nd, could provide small businesses with $ 5,000 in grants.

It’s a welcome relief for some, including the owner of Freeses Candy Shoppe, who said their goal is simply to thrive beyond the coronavirus pandemic.

“We honestly cannot afford to prevent politicians from getting resources and support for those who need help,” said Evers.

The Wisconsin Tomorrow Small Business Recovery Grant program is eligible for $ 5,000 in grants to companies that generate between $ 10,000 and $ 7 million annually.

“We all just have to get through this somehow,” said Wendy Matel, owner of Freese’s Candy Shoppe.

Matel has stocked their shelves but hasn’t glossed over the fact that part of their business, heavenly roasted nuts – sold at festivals and events – has gone dark.

“It was difficult for our company to understand,” said Matel.

She said the scholarship was a welcome relief.

“We all want to be successful,” said Matel. “It’s just a small way to help.”

Likewise, Lilo Allen of the Bronzeville Collective in Milwaukee said that grants are far more powerful than loans.

“Especially for small businesses, and especially for minority businesses that typically don’t have the seed capital to do the things they need,” Allen said.

The co-founder shares space with roughly 25 vendors and said that this money could help many focus on what they do best – their craft.

Bronzeville collective

“With grants that bring this financial infusion straight into the business, so many of our vendors can take it to the next level, get better branding, buy more products and really take a break and focus on their creativity, which I find amazing,” he said to all.

Evers estimates that 84,000 companies will benefit from this program.

In a joint statement, Assembly Spokesman Robin Vos and Senate Majority Leader Devin LeMahieu called his veto disappointing, Wisconsin wants to know where the rest of the $ 3.2 billion will go and says Wisconsin deserves transparency in the process.