Church elevating cash to buy previous Franklin Elementary College constructing

FRANKLIN, WV. (WHSV) – Redeeming Grace Outreach Worship Center is soliciting donations to raise $ 350,000 for the purchase of the old Franklin Elementary School building as the new home of their ministry.

The Church’s current home is in a small building on Route 33 in Brandywine and is no longer able to sustain all of its growing ministries.

“This system already has the maximum capacity that we can use. In fact, we had to give up our clothing service because we didn’t have enough space due to our expansion, ”said Jason Boggs, pastor at Redeeming Grace.

The Church is already serving the community in a variety of ways and is keen to expand its ministries to include soup kitchen, addiction care, counseling, clothing services, and new ways to help.

“We plan to set up a homeless shelter on the second floor of the school during the winter season to accommodate people in Rockingham County, as well as Moorefield and Petersburg and some in Franklin, for those who need a place to stay for the night,” said Boggs.

The Church also plans to provide more confidential addiction counseling at the larger facility, as well as establishing a youth center to address the high rates of drug use and suicide among youth in the area.

“It’s gotten out of hand, so hopefully by opening doors we can make a difference,” said Richard Lockner, a Redeeming Grace member who also serves as the Church’s treasurer.

“Everyone in this area goes to Virginia to find a job and work, so there really aren’t any jobs here. There aren’t many places for children, ”said Pastor Boggs. “So we just want to bring them in there and entertain them to keep them out of trouble so they don’t resort to drugs.”

Redeeming Grace is a nondenominational church that lives up to its name. The building and its pastor were both redeemed in their own way.

“I was serving a drug sentence when I was 15, so reaching out to this community and having a program for chain-breaking addiction is my heart,” said Boggs.

The church’s current building was an old strip club before Boggs and his family decided to renovate it. Now it is a church that is committed to helping those in need and giving people a second chance.

“We at the Redeming Grace ministry are not a perfect place, but we feel like we are the perfect place for imperfect people,” said Scott Combs, one of the other Church pastors.

Like Boggs, Combs fought his own demons and had a history of drinking alcoholism before becoming a pastor. Boggs prides itself on the impartial service of the Church to everyone who needs it.

“Anyone who comes through the door, we just love them,” he said. “We say ‘welcome home’ to them because we really feel like they are at home, no matter what their background, no matter what they have done. If God can take a drug dealer and make him a preacher, God can make anything of their lives. “

Of the $ 350,000 it took to purchase the school building, the Church has currently raised just over $ 22,000.

If you want to donate, you can do so here.

Copyright 2021 WHSV. All rights reserved.

Chula Vista Elementary College District cash on psychological well being

Many students are still facing pandemic-related struggles.

CHULA VISTA, Calif. – On Wednesday, nearly 30,000 children in the Chula Vista Elementary School District will return to campus full time for the first time in 16 months.

The district is open all year round, marking the start of a new year.

While the first day of school is often nerve-wracking, many students struggle with social and emotional issues related to the pandemic.

“Many of our children have had some pretty difficult things to do in the past 16 months,” said Elizabeth Gianulis, director of the district’s tiered support system.

She said this includes feelings of isolation, increased anxiety, and the loss of a loved one due to COVID-19.

“A parent, grandparents, friends,” said Gianulis.

As a result, the county is spending more money on social and emotional support than ever before.

This new school year, she says the district has allocated more money than ever to make sure the children are safe not only physically but also emotionally.

“Each school will have a full-time school psychologist and then each school will have access to a school counselor or social worker,” said Gianulis.

The district with 46 locations and almost 30,000 students has always had psychologists available. but not to this extent.

Gianulis said her staff has quadrupled.

“Before the pandemic, a handful of schools had part-time support from mental health providers, but not at this level where they actually have their own school counselor or school social worker,” she said.

In the first few weeks after their return, the children get to know their counselors and social workers so they know who to talk to if they want.

Teachers and staff are also trained to refer children when they see someone in trouble.

“We look at attendance, we look at behavioral recommendations, even how often a student will visit the nurse,” said Gianulis.

In addition, social and emotional wellbeing will be part of the daily curriculum.

“In every single classroom, at least 15 minutes a day are devoted to social, emotional learning only,” said Gianulis.

Videos are circulating on the Internet informing families of the changes.

Gianulis hopes this type of support will become the norm not just this year but forever.

“We firmly believe in supporting the whole child,” she said.

Gianulis suggests that parents also look for signs that their child is having trouble.

This may include changing attitudes, having difficulty sleeping, or losing interest in things they used to enjoy.

She said parents can notify their child’s teacher, principal, or receptionist if they would like their child to speak to someone.

CLOCK RELATED: College Students Suffering From Mental Health Issues At A Faster Pace During The Pandemic (Oct 2020)

Peebles Elementary College honors academics, Hollywood fashion | Training

For a year like no other, an elementary school rolled out the red carpet to celebrate its teacher stars in Hollywood fashion.

Peebles Elementary School turned their regular weekly professional development into an Academy Awards to round off a week of teacher appreciation.

The school’s teaching staff mixed fun and stupidity with a dash of truth and voted on a creative list of award winners.

Bilingual fifth grade teacher Maribel Carraballo was voted the most likely speaker in the staff room.

She liked to take a moment to laugh and think, saying that this school year has shown the resilience of teachers and students.

“This year has been a challenge and a blessing,” she said. “We have proven that we can adapt and overcome. We made it through the year and the kids are happy. “

Interventionist Laura Foster, a 29-year-old educator, echoed these feelings. She was voted the most likely person to knock on your door during the admission.

“I’m overwhelmed,” she said over the red carpet, the gold stars with the teachers’ names and a spectacular cake depicting Peebles ’61 years of service. “Everything is so beautiful.”

“It’s been a year like no other,” she said. “We all appreciate the effort to show appreciation. It warms our hearts when colleagues honor our service. I am amazed at what we did. “

Headmistress Carol Correa called each teacher and praised her hard work during the challenging year before firing them earlier than usual to continue visiting or leaving for the day.

“We have adapted throughout the year,” she said, remembering the “180 degree” spin that teachers had achieved to teach virtually with the advent of COVID-19.

“We wanted them to feel like VIPs,” she said. “It’s really part of our culture here, but we wanted to make it a little better.”

“We are blessed to be appreciated this year,” said teacher Denise Zamora. “It makes a difference. We can see that the hard work is paying off. “

The following Academy Awards went to the following Peebles teachers, most likely:

  • Come sick to avoid planning for a Christie sub-wife
  • Forget her lunch – Ms. Mena
  • Visit during your conference time – Ms. Spikes
  • Be called if something breaks – Ms. G. Rodriguez
  • Spend your money on school supplies – Ms. Seguinot
  • Go all day without going to the bathroom – Ms. Grubb
  • Finish her lunch in 10 minutes or less – Ms. Vazquez
  • Do you know the name of every student – Coach Brown
  • Knock on your door while you record – Mrs. Foster
  • Carry a bottle of hand sanitizer – Ms. Zamora
  • Have the last car in the parking lot – Mrs. Blanes
  • Have the most organized classroom – Ms. Montero
  • I heard talking in the staff room – Ms. Caraballo
  • Correct your grammar – Ms. N. Johnson
  • Silence a room with just one look – Mrs. Smith
  • Confused with a student – Mrs. Lau
  • Dancing in the hall – Coach Dominowski
  • Do you need technical support – Ms. Wilkey
  • Prank her student – Mrs. Ingraffia
  • New hairstyle – Ms. Ortiz
  • Win danger – Mr. Burkhalter
  • Pack your bags and travel the world – Mrs. Laurenson
  • Provide best advice and wisdom – Ms. Rosas
  • Stay late on lesson planning – Ms. Madera

Lowell Elementary raises cash for Relay for Life

LOWELL, Ohio (WTAP) – Lowell Elementary School raised money for a good cause.

In the past few weeks the school has raised funds for Relay for Life.

Relay for Life is an event that raises money to fight cancer.

Last week the school raised money by having students and staff wear a specific color every day. Students and staff wore orange on Monday, black on Tuesday, blue on Wednesday, white on Thursday and pink on Friday.

This week the school raised money by having a different topic every day. The different theme days were hat day, sports team day, tie dye day, farm day and spirit day.

All participants were asked to donate $ 1 each day.

The school has also raised money through Penny Wars.

As of Thursday, students and staff at the school have raised a total of $ 1,375.09.

Copyright 2021 WTAP. All rights reserved.

Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

Copyright 2021 California-Oregon Broadcasting, Inc.

Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

NBC5 news reporter Mariah Mills is from Medford. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She also studied sociology.

At school, she reported on Oregon athletics for the student-run Duck TV. When she’s not reporting, reading, hiking, and rooting for her favorite teams, the Seattle Seahawks and Oregon Ducks.

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Addison Elementary raises cash in honor of scholar’s brother

ADDISON – Being the new kid in school can be difficult. You need to learn a new school, make new friends, meet new teachers, and figure out where and how you fit in.

Trying to do this after losing a family member makes it even more difficult.

Thus began fourth year Emalynn Jay’s first year at Addison Elementary School. Just a few weeks into the school year, Jay’s younger brother Michael “Junior” died of cancer. He was only 2 years old.

Michael was in hospice care at the beginning of the school year. It was something Emalynn’s teachers and district were aware of.

Even though Emalynn was the new kid in the class, the Addison community quickly gathered around her like its own.

Emalynn and one of her sisters were back at school the day after their brother died. When Emalynn approached elementary school principal Angie Huston with a suggestion, she first discovered that Emalynn was “wise beyond her years.”

“Emalynn said to me, ‘I want to run a fundraiser for the hospital,'” Huston said.

Michael was cared for at ProMedica Russell J. Ebeid Children’s Hospital in Toledo.

“What I experienced was like no other,” said Emalynn.

The Addison student said she liked the way the hospital staff looked after her brother and other children, even though they didn’t know him.

Huston loved the idea.

“I said absolutely,” remarked the director. “I said absolutely we could do that.”

Emalynn’s teacher Samantha Barth was immediately impressed.

“I immediately thought it was a great idea, especially for a fourth grader who comes up with something of his own,” she said.

Huston and his coworkers put together a coin drive last fall. The whole school has also accepted it. Each grade from kindergarten through fifth grade brought in as many coins as possible.

The class that raised the most money would get an ice cream party, but Barth said her class was in to get her to join her classmate.

“It’s like the kids didn’t even take care of the ice cream party,” said Barth. “(One student said) ‘Emalynn is in our class and we have to do that.'”

Kelsey Gietek helped her fourth grade son raise money for his class. She put out a collector’s jar in her shop, Local Roots Massage and Wellness.

The coin drive was supposed to take two weeks but was canceled due to a COVID-19 shutdown. That didn’t stop the fundraiser from being a complete success. Addison Elementary raised more than $ 1,800. Huston said it was the most grown up in a coin-operated school.

Then it was time to donate. Huston let Emalynn and her sisters decide how to spend the money.

Due to the coronavirus, donating to a hospital is a bit difficult, so ProMedica has created a wish list.

Addison Elementary School raised more than $ 1,800 in a coin campaign for ProMedica Russell J. Ebeid Children's Hospital in Toledo.  The money went towards sensory toys, gift cards, and food and beverages for hospital staff.  Elissa Moll, certified child specialist, is pictured with the donations.

The girls spent $ 1,300 checking items from the wish list. They spent an additional $ 250 on Target gift cards that go to families with children in the hospital. Emalynn also wanted to thank the hospital staff, so they spent the last $ 250 on food and drink in the staff lounge.

The donations were delivered during the Christmas break.

“The school was able to provide many sensory toys for distraction during procedures such as squishy balls, light spinners, pop-fidgets, and bubble timers,” said Sharon Pesci, a child life specialist, in a statement to Telephones even during the procedure. The school also donated snacks, treats, and drinks for the staff, which was greatly appreciated! “

Barth said Emalynn and the class received a thank you card from the nurses. The students in the class gave Emalynn a bracelet in memory of her brother.

“I was very proud of my class,” said Barth. “I was surprised it decreased like this.”

Addison’s national motto is “We lift ourselves up by lifting others up”. With Emalynn, Addison Elementary embodied it.

“This was something that she needed that could help in the healing process,” said Huston. “It was a great lesson for our students.”

The status of a new student disappears as soon as a student finds his group of friends and gets used to the community of a school.

Obviously, Emalynn wasn’t the new kid long.

“She was immediately greeted and part of our ward and district,” said Huston.