Payments geared toward international cash in Maine elections one more entrance in CMP hall battle

Good morning from Augusta. After days of almost spring this past week, temperatures this morning of Maine’s 201st birthday are in the single digits. Here is your soundtrack.

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “It basically cut our business in half,” said the Northern Lanes bowling alley manager Dale Nickerson said of the experience of his Presque Isle Business – and many others – had during the first year the coronavirus pandemic in Maine. “A lot of people were upset that they had to wear masks when they walked in, but everyone has to do their part.”

What we see today

Bills preventing foreign companies from spending money on elections and referendums in Maine are another front in the battle for the corridor. A trio of bills pending for a public hearing in Augusta on Monday will go directly to Hydro-Quebec, Central Maine Power’s partner in its controversial powerline project that will run through Maine. The company is owned by the Province of Quebec.

It was a major financier of the opposition to referendums aimed at defeating the corridor project and spending $ 6.7 million alone on the first question. However, these are only the direct campaign spend that must be reported to the Maine Ethics Commission by the end of last year. In addition, after a lull in the fall, Hydro-Quebec resumed running ads in favor of the project this year. The postings have so far been six-digit amounts.

It comes as someone else Referendum campaign The attempt to block the corridor is scheduled for the November elections. These recent efforts would require lawmakers to retrospectively pass laws preventing CMP-sized projects from being built in certain areas of the state. It is likely that this push will also go through multiple court battles and high profile editions before going to the voters. There is ongoing litigation over the permits required for the project. This is under construction.

Each bill has a similar language that excludes foreigners from participating in elections to varying degrees. One is for government agencies only, while another is for all foreigners. Rep. Kyle BaileyD-Gorham is taking another step by specifically preventing media companies from broadcasting the advertisements they want to prevent. Social media platforms would need to remove these ads when they appear on platforms.

This problem has been untested in Maine legislation, where CMP relied on the government. Janet Mills and a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers to kill anti-corridor bills in 2019. But lawmakers had to adjourn in 2020 due to the coronavirus and kiboshing a bill against this foreign money.

You can follow joint Testimony of all three bills to the Legislature’s Veterans and Legal Committee at 10 a.m. today.

The Maine Politics Top 3

– “Maine weathered the virus better than virtually anywhere in America, ” Jessica Piper and Caitlin Andrews, Bangor Daily News: “The state’s rural geography – it was one of the last states to report an initial case – and the low population density helped limit transmission early on, experts said. A relatively high rate of mask-wearing, as well as travel restrictions and testing, have likely kept cases low. But even those measures weren’t enough to prevent the virus from entering long-term care facilities or warding off the widespread spread of winter in Maine still to fully recover with flat cases. “

All Mainers are eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine in Maine after a state vaccination schedule update. Gov. Janet Mills said Friday that the authorization will be extends to all Mainers under 50 years of age on May 1st and not just in their forties according to an order from the President Joe Biden that all states will question all people for the vaccine by May. Currently, Mainers are eligible for the vaccine while aged 60 and over more than 500,000 total cans were administered.

– “A Guide to the $ 6 Billion Coming to Maine in the massive business cycle, ” Lori Valigra, BDN: “Some of the more immediate benefits for Mainers are the extension of the $ 300 weekly unemployment benefit, which expires on March 14th. Direct Payments to Americans starting at $ 1,400 and major tax changes in favor of low-income people. Maine will see money for industries hit hard. The winners include restaurants that can apply for direct grants. Maine will also receive large sums of money for broadband expansion and infrastructure. “

– “Top Democratic lawmakers blow up Maine Medical Center for opposing the Nurses Union, ” Christopher Burns, BDN: “Senate President Troy Jackson, Majority Leader of the Senate Eloise Vitelli, House spokesman Ryan Fecteau and house majority leader Michelle Dunphy wrote in a Friday letter that they are concerned that Maine Medical Center is “mistreating nurses” in support of union efforts. “

Today’s Daily Brief was written by Jessica Piper and Caitlin Andrews. If you read this on the BDN website or have been redirected, you can sign up to have it delivered to your inbox every morning of the week by sending an email to clumm@bangordailynews.com.

To reach us, do not reply directly to this newsletter but contact the political team at mshepherd@bangordailynews.com, candrews@bangordailynews.com or jpiper@bangordailynews.com.

Alaskans have been left in the dead of night as cash poured into elections final yr. Now, that is altering.

A voting sign at Hanshew Middle School in Anchorage on the morning of Election Day last year. (Jeff Chen / Alaska Public Media)

Two weeks before the November elections, attacks were posted on Facebook targeting independent and democratic legislative candidates.

“Calvin Schrage is not independent,” said one of the advertisements, referring to the independent candidate for a seat in the House of Representatives who represents Anchorage Hillside. “He’s a typical liberal democrat.”

This complaint, which attacks Anchorage State House independent candidate Stephen Trimble, is from the Council on Good Government. Most of the Council on Good Government’s money came from the Republican State Leadership Committee, whose largest donor in Alaska prior to last year’s elections was the telecommunications company GCI. (Facebook)

The group that paid for the ads, the Council on Good Government, received nearly all of the $ 380,000 it raised from a single group: those based in Washington, DC Republican Governance Committee. But only after the votes were counted did the RSLC have to disclose the sources of the $ 8.5 million in its own submissions, collected in the month leading up to election day.

When the RSLC created the file this report to the IRSit only showed one large Alaskan donor: GCI. The Anchorage telecommunications giant gave the RSLC $ 100,000 in early October – the day before the group reported it had transferred $ 75,000 to the Council on Good Government.

The donation came as a shock to some political observers.

“You’re kidding,” said Amber Lee, who led the campaigns for two candidates targeted by the Good Government Council. “Impressive.”

GCI’s $ 100,000 contribution was significant to politics in Alaska, as most legislative candidates raise less than that much money over the course of their entire campaigns. But it was far from unique: groups on both sides of last year’s struggle for control of state lawmakers spent significant sums of money on corporations that didn’t disclose – or not at all – their donors before the elections.

But from this year this practice will be banned: A citizens’ initiative approved in November Groups attempting to influence the election of candidates must disclose the “true source” of all donations in excess of $ 2,000.

“Getting this information from IRS tax documents in February for money spent to influence Alaska’s voters in last November’s elections is of no use to voters,” said Shea Siegert, who led the successful initiative campaign. “That is the problem that Election Action 2 was supposed to fix.”

The RSLC supports GOP legislative candidates across the country, and the GCI issued a statement saying that its contribution to the organization was not intended for a specific campaign.

GCI is making a donation to the RSLC “in support of their work both across the state of Alaska and across the country, and advocating for candidates who support companies like GCI and promote strong economic policies,” spokeswoman Heather Handyside wrote in an email.

“We have chosen to support the RSLC directly as an organization that has effectively participated in elections in the past,” said Handyside.

The Council on Good Government – the Alaska-based group that attacked independent and Democratic candidates – has raised more than $ 300,000 from the RSLC over the past year. The money came in several installments, including the $ 75,000 the day after the GCIs donation.

RSLC also gave $ 150,000 to defend the Alaskan elections last year. This is the group that has struggled unsuccessfully to defeat the electoral initiative which, among other things, requires greater disclosure from donors. Defend Alaska Elections received $ 45,000 direct from GCI and $ 50,000 from two top GCI executives.

The Council on Good Government supported GOP legislative candidates in five races at the Anchorage State House and one race in the Fairbanks Senate.

The group supported three victorious Republican candidates: Fairbanks Senator Robb Myers, who defeated the independent Marna Sanford; Anchorage Rep. David Nelson, who defeated the Democrat Lyn Franks; and Anchorage Rep. Sara Rasmussen, who defeated the independent Stephen Trimble.

This ad, attacking Democratic Anchorage State House candidate Liz Snyder, comes from the Council on Good Government. (Facebook)

The group also supported three lost Republicans: former Anchorage Rep. Lance Pruitt, who lost to Democrat Liz Snyder; former Anchorage Rep. Mel Gillis, who lost to Schrage, the Independent; and Kathy Henslee, who lost to incumbent Anchorage Rep. Chris Tuck.

Among the ads by the Council on Good Government were radio spots praising Pruitt as “one of the most respected members of the legislature” and promoting Snyder for “government-run health care” and an income tax – even though Snyder refused to approve an income tax during a campaign debate .

Other ads on Facebook labeled independent candidates Schrage and Trimble as “typical Liberal Democrats” and “fake independent liberals”, respectively.

Lee, who led the Trimble and Snyder campaigns, said the lack of information about the ad sponsors makes it difficult for candidates to respond at this point.

“All of the information you have changes to some degree, what kind of research you do and what kind of tactics you use,” she said.

The RSLC wasn’t the only major campaign donor in Alaska, however, whose supporters were not revealed in the election.

Progressive organizations that do not reveal their donors also donated five- and six-figure amounts to groups that support democratic and independent candidates. And because these organizations are organized differently, they do not report their donors to the state or the IRS.

Defend AlaskaThe company, which raised $ 500,000 last year to support progressive candidates, raised $ 150,000 with the Washington, DC-based nonprofit Sixteen thirty funds. The fund does not disclose the identity of its contributors Politico once described it as “fueled by massive anonymous donations, including a gift totaling $ 51.7 million”.

This complaint, which attacks former East Anchorage GOP representative Lance Pruitt, was paid for by a group called Defend Alaska. Defend Alaska raised large donations from several groups that do not disclose their donors. (Facebook)

Defend Alaska also raised $ 50,000 at the Alaska Progressive Donor Table, a nonprofit based in Anchorage. Kay Brown, a former Alaska Democratic Party executive director listed as one of the officers on the donor table, declined to immediately disclose information about their donors.

Defend Alaska chairwoman Barbara Blake referred questions about the group’s donors to the donors themselves, though she noted that Defend Alaska began as a grassroots effort.

In future state elections, the newly approved electoral measure will force groups to disclose more information about their donors.

Siegert, the initiative’s campaign manager, said the new rules should give Alaskans “real-time” information about groups trying to influence candidates’ campaigns within the state. Disclosure of donations and contributions is required within 24 hours.

“These people have a reason to contribute to campaigns, and the voters, who know who is donating, give them the opportunity to decide for themselves why these contributors contribute to a particular candidate,” said Siegert. “Voters can only research the information that is publicly available – they can speculate about the rest, but if we don’t have laws and regulations about the rest that make that information public, voters will be disadvantaged.”

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at [email protected] or on Twitter @stacyryburn.

Cash raised, spent not figuring out consider Fayetteville elections

FAYETTEVILLE – Raising or spending more money on a campaign didn’t necessarily mean winning the city’s races for the local office.

Municipal candidates were required to submit final campaign contributions and spending reports for the November 3rd general election by December 30th. This is in addition to the pre-election reports and reports related to the December 1 runoff election, if applicable.

Candidates for the city’s mayor and council races in the general election raised around $ 145,000 in total, with more than $ 135,000 spent on campaigning.

Mayor Lioneld Jordan won re-election for a fourth term, surpassing his closest opponent, Tom Terminella. Jordan raised more than $ 38,000 on $ 21,750 from Terminella. Jordan also spent more than $ 33,000 on his campaign while Terminella only spent more than $ 21,700. Jordan received 24,641 votes, or 68%, and Terminella 9,050 votes, or 25%.

Mayoral candidates Ron Baucom and William Harris, whose total vote was 2,716, or 7%, raised no money and only spent more than $ 200 apiece. Baucom spent $ 241 on signs and business cards, while Harris spent $ 227 on office supplies, brochures, and business cards.

Terminella submitted its final report on the general election on late January 8, according to the Washington County Clerk’s Office postage stamp.

Twelve contestants in the city’s four city races raised around $ 85,000 in total and reportedly spent around $ 80,000.

Two candidates for Ward 1 – Tanner Pettigrew and Oroo Oyioka – have submitted their final reports for the general election on Friday and Thursday, respectively. Three councilors – Pedro Fimbres Jr. in Station 1, Matthew Petty in Station 2, and Kyle Smith in Station 4 – filed their final reports a day later on December 31st.

The Arkansas Ethics Commission will generally only investigate a potential violation, e.g. B. if a complaint is not submitted correctly or in time when a complaint is submitted. The Commission can impose fines or send a letter of referral if it determines that there has been a breach.

D’Andre Jones won the Ward 1 seat against Pettigrew in a runoff election. Jones raised just over $ 10,300 and spent more than $ 14,000 on the general election. His pre-election report for the runoff showed he had raised nearly $ 2,500 and only spent more than $ 1,800.

With that, Jones has raised more than $ 12,000 in total and spent more than $ 16,000. He also started his campaign with $ 1,000 and borrowed $ 1,600.

A volunteer campaign worker for Jones said he raised a little more money during the runoff and made up the difference with a loan to himself. A final outflow report due Feb. 1 will reflect the amounts, she said.

The money reflected in Pettigrew’s general election reports and pre-election runoff report showed that he led Jones in donations with about $ 18,000 and only more than $ 16,000 in expenses.

Jones led Pettigrew in the November 3rd election by 3,108 votes, or 38%, to Pettigrew’s 2,413 votes, or 30%. Jones won the runoff election on December 1 by 1,040 votes, or 72%, compared to Pettigrew’s 408 votes, or 28% according to the unofficial number of votes.

Fimbres raised $ 4,400 and spent $ 4,060. Oyioka reported $ 439 in funds raised with $ 1,252 for its campaign.

Station 2 candidates, Petty and William Chesser, raised comparable sums of money of approximately $ 8,900 each. Petty, the incumbent, only spent more than $ 5,000 on his campaign, compared to $ 8,900 on Chesser’s spending.

Petty won the race with 64% of the vote, or 4,135 total votes. Chesser got 2,300, or 36%.

Peter Tonnessen did not raise money in his campaign to depose incumbent Ward 3 Councilor Sarah Bunch, who raised $ 6,350. Tonnessen spent $ 1,470 on Bunchs $ 3,913.

Bunch won re-election by 54 points with 7,548 votes, or 77%, over Tonnessen’s 2,258 votes, or 23%.

Kyle Smith, who was named to his seat in Ward 4 by the city council in 2017, has surpassed and surpassed eventual winner of the race, Holly Hertzberg. Smith raised $ 19,760 to $ 14,870 from Hertzberg. He also spent $ 20,515, compared to $ 15,027 Hertzberg spent on their campaign.

Smith borrowed $ 2,000 for his campaign. Hertzberg had a $ 157 loan to make up the difference between the amounts earned and spent.

Hertzberg won the election on November 3rd with 4,894 votes, or 51% and a majority. Smith received 3,043 votes, or 31%. Paul Waddell finished third with 942 votes, or 10%, and perennial candidate Adam Fire Cat got 774, or 8%.

Waddell raised $ 1,925 and spent $ 1,942. Fire Cat raised no money but did spend $ 13 on advertising.

More news

Election deadlines

If a candidate was rejected and raised or spent more than $ 500, the November 3rd general election required a campaign contribution and expense report. The reports covered all activities through October 24th.

Each candidate was required to submit a final report on the general election, regardless of whether money was raised or spent. The final report was due on December 30th. If the candidate filed the pre-election report and was not in the runoff election, the period covered was October 25th to the date submitted. If the candidate filed a pre-election report and went to a runoff election, the activity spanned October 25 through November 3.

A pre-election report for the December 1 runoff was due on November 24 and covered activities from November 4 to November 21.

The final report for the runoff election is due on February 1st. It is valid for November 22nd until the submitted date.

Source: Washington County Electoral Commission

Stacy Ryburn can be reached by email at sryburn@nwadg.com or on Twitter @stacyryburn.