Google Meet provides Duo-style filters, AR masks, and results

Google Meet receives new video filters, effects and augmented reality masks for personal calls on iOS and Android. announced the search giant. They are available during a call via the glitter icon in the lower right of your video feed, which displays a carousel of various effects, including color filters and animated AR face effects. Most of the options are only available for personal Gmail accounts, while Workspace users need to be more professional with a limited range of blur and virtual background options.

The new video effects are the latest example of Meet’s shift from targeting corporate and business users to a more general consumer targeting after Google released Meet free for private Google accounts last year. The filters are very similar to those was already available for the consumer-focused duo video chat service from Google and 9to5Google previously reported that the company plans to replace Duo with Meet at some point.

When trying to understand all of Google’s messaging products, don’t worry. you’re not alone. Fortunately, we may soon have one less Google service to keep an eye on.

Leisure venues get ‘lifeline’ grants because of results of pandemic

MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) – Entertainment venues were among the first to close their doors due to the pandemic and the last to reopen fully, but thanks to federal government support, many are aiming for a comeback this year.

The Small Business Administration has facilitated the distribution of funds from the Shuttered Venues Operators Grant (SVOG) program. To date, 85 scholarships have been awarded in Wisconsin with a total volume of around 86 million US dollars.

Performing arts executives in Milwaukee said people long to return to the shows at the venues.

“There are very few things that are as meaningful as attending a performance like in a place like this, which is so beautiful and brings people together in a way that we missed tremendously during Covid,” said Mark Niehaus, President and Executive Director of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, across from CBS 58 inside the Bradley Symphony Center on Wisconsin Avenue.

The nonprofit will receive approximately $ 1.7 million from SVOG. Niehaus said the money will help, but it won’t erase all of the financial impact of the pandemic.

“It makes a difference to us, but it doesn’t solve the problem for us,” said Niehaus.

The Marcus Performing Arts Center will receive approximately $ 6.5 million from the scholarship. They told CBS 58 that the funds will be very helpful in preparing for the return of live performances and audiences later this year.

“It will really help us openly reopening this fall so we can recruit staff and bring shows back to the Marcus Center,” said President and CEO Kendra Whitlock Ingram in an interview.

The Pabst Theater Group and its foundation will receive a total of approximately $ 10.8 million. Its CEO, Gary Witt, led a national effort through the National Independent Venue Association to raise pandemic funding for entertainment venues.

“It was a long way to actually distribute the money, but it was worth it,” Witt told CBS 58.

While Witt says the grants have made a big impact, many other small institutions are still waiting for their applications to be approved, which Witt is pushing for.

“We won’t rest until all of these companies are funded because that’s how we started,” said Witt.

For more information about the recipients in Wisconsin, see Here.

Minnesota to spend $132 million in federal rescue cash to spice up scholar restoration from pandemic results

June 30, 2021 7:57 pm

Mike Tighe

Posted: Jun 30, 2021 7:57 PM

Updated June 30, 2021 8:06 PM

(Associated press photo)

ST. PAUL, Minnesota (WKBT) – Governor Tim Walz announced Wednesday that Minnesota will be spending $ 132 million in US federal rescue plan education funds to aid student recovery from the effects of COVID-19.
The announcement came after the Minnesota Department of Education presented the state plan to the U.S. Department of Education. The state received a total of $ 1.3 billion for E-12 education as part of the rescue plan, 90 percent of which was given direct to schools through a federal formula.
The $ 132 million makes up the remaining 10 percent.
Contributing to the decision was public feedback designed to bolster critical programs that weren’t on the E-12 education budget, as well as tailor support for students facing the greatest challenges due to the pandemic, Walz said.
“Minnesota’s students and families faced so many challenges during the pandemic, and helping each one of them remains a top priority, especially as we move into the next school year,” said Walz.
“This funding enables us to invest in things that couldn’t be agreed in the education budget, but which we know our students need to get back on track and stay on track in school.” , he said.
Lt. Gov. Peggy Flanagan added a parental opinion, saying, “As a mom to an upcoming third grader, I know how tough this school year has been for our students and families. We owe it to them to do everything possible to support not only their academic recovery, but also their socio-emotional and mental health. “
Federal law requires Minnesota to spend most of the $ 132 million on four areas: learning recreation, post-school programs, summer enrichment, and other government activities to support students and schools. A small portion can be used for grant administration.
The payouts include:

  • In the area of ​​learning recovery, the Department of Education will allocate $ 66 million directly to public schools to help students apply evidence-based strategies. Schools are also encouraged to work with community organizations to support students.
  • For after-school programs, $ 13.2 million is being made available to Ignite Afterschool, an organization and network leader experienced in evidence-based extra-curricular programming, for the distribution of grants. Fifty percent of the funds go to charitable organizations. The other half is directed to culture-specific community organizations.
  • Another $ 13.2 million will be provided through grants for summer education, with 50 percent going to community organizations. The remaining 50 percent is dedicated to culturally specific community organizations.
  • Approximately $ 26 million will be used in public school grants for full-service community schools to expand rigorous coursework and other endeavors. The remaining $ 13.6 million for other government activities and grant administration will be used to build and strengthen systems within the Department of Education.