A Camper With a View, the Panorama Shelter Blends With Type in Dutch Landscapes

The Panorama Shelter is a special type of teardrop camper with a design that aims to blend the inside with the outside. It is a Dutch concept that was developed to travel around the Netherlands and showcase its landscapes.

This bespoke shelter is the collaboration of Kip Caravans, a Dutch caravan manufacturer, and six other partners, including the Dutch Bureau for Tourism and Conventions (NBTC). It is part of a program called Ode to the Landscape, which aims to promote tourism in the Netherlandsthrough a series of events and excursions that will take place throughout the year.

The Panorama Shelter is a more artistic and improved version of the Shelter Camper by Kip. The original camper is the company’s smallest trailer, measuring 4.5 m and weighing 560 kg. The trailer has a very open design with windows on top and on both sides. But this new version received even larger panoramic windows and their number was also increased in order to make traveler feel as close as possible to the nature that surrounds you.

There is a tall window on the front door, large windows on the right and left that cover most of the side walls, and a pop-top roof with cotton cloth. They are all thermally insulated to ensure a comfortable indoor temperature in summer and to maintain warmth in winter.

The Panorama Shelter is spacious and fully equipped. It has a kitchen with a fridge, a spacious sofa bed with a 2 m long bed and a mobile toilet box. The sink has a faucet that works for outside showers. There is a built-in 240V power supply and an induction hob that you can use to prepare your meals indoors or outdoors.

Unfortunately that is Panorama protection was specially developed for the “Ode to the Landscape” program, so it will not be offered for sale. Hopefully Kip Caravans will consider adding the model to their range, but for now you can still choose between the other models available on their website.

Guests tiptoe by the tulips in Dutch virus take a look at | Leisure




In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

In the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, Netherlands, Friday, April 9, 2021, there are far fewer visitors than usual. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

Two women take photos because there are far fewer visitors than usual in the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, the Netherlands, on Friday, April 9, 2021. Finally, after a month after the dreary month of lockdown, shots of hope emerge in the spring of easing coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public facilities. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.




Visitors tiptoe through the tulips in the Dutch virus test

A couple with face masks took their photos in the world-famous Keukenhof garden in Lisse, the Netherlands, on Friday, April 9th, 2021. After a month after the dreary month of lockdown, there are glimmers of hope in spring for a relaxation of coronavirus restrictions in a Dutch flower garden and other public venues. Keukenhof, nestled in the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague, opened its doors on Friday to a happy 5,000 people who were only admitted if they could prove on a smartphone app that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.

From MIKE CORDER Associated Press

LISSE, Netherlands (AP) – After the bleak winter months of a coronavirus lockdown, spring hopes erupted on Friday as restrictions were eased at a Dutch flower garden and other public facilities.

As part of a government-approved pilot project, the world-famous Keukenhof Gardens opened its gates to let a few thousand people tiptoe through the 7 million tulips, hyacinths, daffodils and myriad other flowers carefully tipped by a small army of people manicured lawns were planted by gardeners.

A maximum of 5,000 visitors were allowed to enter the garden in the middle of the pancake fields between Amsterdam and The Hague if they could prove that they had just tested negative for COVID-19.

Minke Kleinen, who visited downtown Arnhem with her friend Ilse van Egten, said it felt like her “first legal day”. The friends took quick tests before leaving and received their negative results by email as they drove.

“It feels strange that we can stand next to each other,” said Van Egten and hugged the little ones briefly. “It is nice!”

Keukenhof lost an entire season to the pandemic last year when the first deadly wave of infections swept across the Netherlands. The planned opening on March 20 this year never took place due to the country’s strict virus lockdown.

Dutch poet declines project to translate Gorman’s works | Leisure



American poet Amanda Gorman reads a poem during the 59th President’s inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, January 20, 2021.


Patrick Semansky

The Hague, Netherlands (AP) – A writer chosen to translate the work of American poet Amanda Gorman into Dutch has returned the contract after criticizing a white author for being chosen to translate the words of a black one Translate woman who is the youngest inaugural poet in US history.

Marieke Lucas Rijneveld, who became the last year youngest writer to win The International Booker Prize with their novel “The Discomfort of Evening” announced the decision in a Twitter post on Friday.

A Dutch translation of “The Hill We Climb” The poem Gorman was recited with great success at the inauguration of US President Joe Biden, should be published by Meulenhoff at the end of March.

“I am shocked by the turmoil surrounding my involvement in spreading Amanda Gorman’s message, and I understand people who are hurt by Meulenhoff’s decision to ask me,” said Rijneveld, who writes both poetry and novels.

Meulenhoff’s general director Maaike le Noble said in a statement that the publisher would like to learn from the experience.

“We will be looking for a team to work with to translate Amanda’s words and message of hope and inspiration as well as possible and in her mind,” said Le Noble.