Choose asks why DOJ is not searching for extra money from US Capitol rioters

“Where we have that Congress donate all of this money directly to the events on Jan. to pay the bill for nearly half a billion dollars, a bit of a surprise, “said Chief Judge Beryl Howell.

“I’m used to the government being pretty aggressive,” Howell added.

The defendant, who pleaded guilty during Monday’s hearing, Glenn Wes Lee Croy, agreed to pay $ 500 in damages, which has become typical of defendants pleading for offense. The few rioters who pleaded guilty to the criminal charge have agreed to pay $ 2,000 in compensation each.

DC's chief federal judge questions criminal offense treaties for US Capitol riotersAs the Justice Department intensifies its efforts to investigate the more than 560 federal cases related to the Sept. Howell has repeatedly questioned whether prosecutors are doing enough to deter similar attacks in the future and whether the offense plea offers adequately take into account the severity of the damage caused that day.

So far, 34 people who resulted from the uprising have pleaded guilty.

According to federal prosecutors, Croy bragged to a social media agent that “I was there on January 6th,” and shared photos of himself at the Capitol. He faces a potential prison sentence of up to six months, although if convicted he may face a much shorter or no prison sentence.

Prosecutors said they would explain why they capped the $ 1.5 million refund before Croy is convicted in October.

SpaceX engineer pleads responsible to DOJ insider buying and selling prices

SpaceX headquarters in Los Angeles, California.

AaronP / Bauer-Griffin | GC Images | Getty Images

A SpaceX engineer pleaded guilty to a Justice Department charge of insider trading, the agency said Thursday after using information obtained on the dark Internet to trade public securities using non-public information.

The DOJ’s criminal case against James Roland Jones of Hermosa Beach, California was investigated by the FBI in 2017.

The government’s announcement In the agreement, Jones was identified as a SpaceX engineer, although the agency did not specify whether he currently works for the space company and whether he was doing so at the time of the fraud.

The Securities and Exchange Commission at the same time incriminated Jones with “pursuing a fraudulent scheme to sell what he called” insider tips “on the dark internet in exchange for Bitcoin. The SEC did not name SpaceX in its complaint.

The case does not appear to be related to any information about or relating to SpaceX.

SpaceX, the DOJ, and the SEC did not immediately respond to CNBC’s requests for comment.

The DOJ said Jones used the nickname “MillionaireMike” to purchase information such as address, date of birth, and social security number on the dark internet. The SEC-defined dark web “refers to anything on the Internet that is not indexed or accessible through a search engine like Google.”

Jones then used that information to conduct financial transactions on material, nonpublic information, the DOJ claims. In April 2017, an undercover FBI agency gave Jones “alleged inside information regarding a publicly traded company,” the DOJ said.

“From April 18, 2017 to May 4, 2017, Jones and a conspirator conducted numerous securities transactions based on this alleged inside information,” the DOJ said.

The SEC accused Jones of violating the federal securities law. Jones agreed to a forked settlement with the SEC and faces a maximum five-year sentence in federal prison under his request to the DOJ.

“This case shows that the SEC can and will prosecute securities law violations wherever they operate, including the Internet,” said David Peavler, director of the SEC’s Fort Worth regional office, in a statement.