Centerville units leisure district listening to on plan to assist companies, actual property, jobs, economic system, eating places

The proposed entertainment district spans about six blocks on 48 or Main Street Ohio and about five blocks on Franklin Street, records show.

The designation would support strategies for the city’s business development that call for a “high-end bar with music, a brewery … (and) unique restaurants,” according to the proposal.

The proposed district “would mirror the existing 113 acre Architectural Preservation District” and its approval would give access to 15 new liquor permits, Centerville records show.

Currently the city has fewer than five in that area, said Centerville Development Director Michael Norton-Smith.

ExploreBUSINESS: The Centerville entertainment district push calls for a $ 50 million investment

Metropolis Council to vote on downtown leisure district

TEXARKANA, Texas – During a regular session on Monday, the city council will hold a public hearing and vote on establishing a downtown entertainment district that allows outdoor drinking.

The idea is to mirror a similar neighborhood created in 2019 in Texarkana, Arkansas, with the intent of encouraging development and attracting visitors to the downtown area.

If the district-endorsing ordinance is passed, open, glass-free containers with alcoholic beverages may be opened outdoors with the exception of Sundays between 2.15 a.m. and 12.00 p.m. and on other days between 2.15 a.m. and 7.00 a.m.

The district would largely coincide with the Downtown Arts and Historic District and include the Perot Theater, Texarkana Regional Arts Center, Art Park, Kress Gap, Ace of Clubs House, Pecan Point, and Silvermoon on Broad, but not that Bi-State Justice Building.

The ordinance prohibits the use of glass containers for liquids on public roads, sidewalks or alleys and does not conflict with existing noise ordinances. The state alcohol law, including the need for permits to sell alcohol and the ban on open containers in vehicles, would remain in place.

If the ordinance is approved, city officials will consider the need for additional bins and garbage disposal.

Re-zoning, permits

The council will also hold hearings and vote on a number of requests for reassignment and approval:

– Re-zoning of an undeveloped plot of land north of Gazola Str. 100 in order to build multi-family houses there. The property owner is considering donating it to the mountain. Sinai House of Prayer Church, which has proposed several apartment building projects in the immediate area.

– Re-zoning and granting of a special use permit to build a double-wide prefabricated house in 302 Daniels St.

– Approval of a site plan for the construction of a Panda Express restaurant at 3100 St. Michael Drive.

– Zoning 605 Ward Ave. and granting a special use permit to enable a double-wide prefabricated house there.

Another pair of hearings and votes concerns requests for grants from the Texas Department of Transportation to fund improvements to pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure.

If the council approves the proposals, the city will ask for $ 1.8 million for sidewalks along Kennedy Lane and $ 800,000 for sidewalks along Leopard Lane.

The city would apply for two different TxDOT funding programs, Transportation Alternatives Set-Aside (TASA) and Safe Routes to School-Infrastructure (SRTS).

No matching funding is required for SRTS grants, but TASA grants require a 20% grant, which the city would pay with a combination of in-kind and cash. Federal funding could cover gaming expenses.

Block grants for community development

The council will receive initial information on three measures in connection with block grants for municipal development of the federal government. Public hearings and votes will follow during the next scheduled meeting of the Council on July 12th.

One would amend the city budget to include more than $ 293,000 in CDBG funding received as a result of the COVID Aid CARES bill. The second would move $ 163,000 from an inactive loan fund to another fund that will repay CDBG-guaranteed loans. The third would approve the city’s 2021 action plan for CDBG funds.

The agenda includes an open forum where residents can address the council for up to five minutes on any topic.

The meeting is for Monday at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, 220 Texas Blvd. A live video stream will be available through the city’s website, ci.texarkana.tx.us.

European-style flower present LEAF blooms all through Meatpacking District, NYC

MEATPACKING DISTRICT, Manhattan (WABC) – The Meatpacking District is hosting a one-of-a-kind flower festival this weekend.

More than 100 florists have exhibited in shop windows and squares across the neighborhood to create a European-style flower market.

“In a city with so many great talented florists and flower designers, I am very excited to present LEAF, our first annual flower festival,” said Moira Breslin, founder of LEAF – especially the Meatpacking District, TF Cornerstone and all florists – that we are making this happen could. We are excited to provide a platform for a new generation of florists to showcase their talents and turn the Meatpacking District into a riot Color – a gift for all New Yorkers during LEAF weekend “

Mayor Bill de Blasio even took part in the kickoff of the event on Saturday.

Organizers hope the festival will bring people back to the area as NYC continues to open.

“It enabled us to activate the whole neighborhood – restaurants, retailers got involved – and then just showcase the amazing creative class in town,” said Jeffrey LeFrancois of the Meatpacking Improvement District.

The festival lasts until 6 p.m. on Sunday.

Click here for more.

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Metropolis Council to vote on downtown leisure district

TEXARKANA, Texas – During a regular session on Monday, the city council will hold a public hearing and vote on establishing a downtown entertainment district that allows outdoor drinking.

The idea is to mirror a similar neighborhood created in 2019 in Texarkana, Arkansas, with the intent of encouraging development and attracting visitors to the downtown area.

If the district-endorsing ordinance is passed, open, glass-free containers with alcoholic beverages may be opened outdoors with the exception of Sundays between 2.15 a.m. and 12.00 p.m. and on other days between 2.15 a.m. and 7.00 a.m.

The district would largely coincide with the Downtown Arts and Historic District and include the Perot Theater, Texarkana Regional Arts Center, Art Park, Kress Gap, Ace of Clubs House, Pecan Point, and Silvermoon on Broad, but not that Bi-State Justice Building.

The ordinance prohibits the use of glass containers for liquids on public roads, sidewalks or alleys and does not conflict with existing noise ordinances. The state alcohol law, including the need for permits to sell alcohol and the ban on open containers in vehicles, would remain in place.

If the ordinance is approved, city officials will consider the need for additional bins and garbage disposal.

Re-zoning, permits

The council will also hold hearings and vote on a number of requests for reassignment and approval:

n Re-zoning of fallow land north of Gazola Str. 100 for the construction of apartment buildings. The property owner is considering donating it to the mountain. Sinai House of Prayer Church, which has proposed several apartment building projects in the immediate area.

n Re-zoning and granting of a special use permit to build a double-wide prefabricated house in 302 Daniels St.

n Approval of a site plan for the construction of a Panda Express restaurant at 3100 St. Michael Drive.

n Zoning 605 Ward Ave. and granting a special use permit to enable a double-wide prefabricated house there.

Another pair of hearings and votes concerns requests for grants from the Texas Department of Transportation to fund improvements to pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure.

If the council approves the proposals, the city will ask for $ 1.8 million for sidewalks along Kennedy Lane and $ 800,000 for sidewalks along Leopard Lane.

The city would apply for two different TxDOT funding programs, Transportation Alternatives Set-Aside (TASA) and Safe Routes to School-Infrastructure (SRTS).

No matching funding is required for SRTS grants, but TASA grants require a 20% grant, which the city would pay with a combination of in-kind and cash. Federal funding could cover gaming expenses.

The council will receive initial information on three measures in connection with block grants for municipal development of the federal government. Public hearings and votes will follow during the next scheduled meeting of the Council on July 12th.

One would amend the city budget to include more than $ 293,000 in CDBG funding received as a result of the COVID Aid CARES bill. The second would move $ 163,000 from an inactive loan fund to another fund that will repay CDBG-guaranteed loans. The third would approve the city’s 2021 action plan for CDBG funds.

The agenda includes an open forum where residents can address the council for up to five minutes on any topic.

The meeting is for Monday at 6:00 p.m. at City Hall, 220 Texas Blvd. A live video stream will be available through the city’s website, ci.texarkana.tx.us.

Leisure district accepted for Chaffee Crossing

The district will be known as the Chaffee Crossing Entertainment District and will be across from the Arkansas Colleges of Health Education.

BARLING, Ark. – The city of Barling is preparing to bring an entertainment district to the area.

Businesses and the mayor look forward to bringing the entertainment district to the area. Companies like Pizza Parlor say it could bring more business to them and others.

“It will be a big boost for this sub-community, for the city and the surrounding areas, especially for the Chafee junction,” said Barling Mayor Wally Gattis.

To get to that point, Barling city directors had to do three things on Tuesday night. The first to enact an ordinance to create an advertising and doctoral committee to promote the district. The second to approve a 1 cent hospitality tax to help fund the commission. Lastly, approve the entertainment district. They did all three on Tuesday.

The district is known as the Chaffee Crossing Entertainment District. It will be across from the Arkansas Colleges of Health Education.

What the entertainment district will offer is the chance for adults to wander around outside with alcoholic beverages. The owners say this will be a boost to their business and something customers have been waiting for.

“They claim to ask customers that they are very upset that they cannot take adult drinks outside of these walls. You are like why? Why are you a private club when we can’t even enjoy it where we want? So, yeah, it’s definitely something customers will be very excited about, ”said Selena Lee, co-owner of Pizza Parlor and Erica Hall.

Mayor Gattis says they are currently working on discussing when the entertainment district will open.

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Bel Air Redesignated As An Arts & Leisure District – CBS Baltimore

BEL AIR, Md. (WJZ) – The Bel Air Arts and Entertainment District was renamed by the Maryland State Arts Council and the Maryland Department of Commerce. The district has had the name since 2011.

Maryland State Arts Council said the mission of boroughs like this is to “develop, promote, and support various artistic and cultural centers in communities across Maryland that have a sense of place, unique local experiences, tourism attract and promote economic recovery and “neighborhood pride.”

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Bel Air’s arts and entertainment district is one of 29 in the state. The nomination lasts from June 1 to July 31, and during this time there are numerous financial incentives for artists to work in the 98 hectare area.

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According to the city, the district offers these incentives:

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  • Change in state income tax deduction for artists creating and selling works in the district,
  • State registration and amusement tax exemption for fees collected by arts and entertainment companies or qualified resident artists and
  • City property tax credit to reduce the property tax increase when building or renovating a building for an arts-related business or artist living / working area within the district.

“The work of local artists, along with the many annual events and festivals that take place in the district, is an opportunity for our community to continue to grow and prosper,” said district manager Angela Robertson. “We are fortunate to have a supportive and committed community and many local partners who promote our artists and continue to help us build a vibrant arts district in Bel Air.”

Railyard Leisure District opens in Rogers

The space is intended to attract visitors to downtown Rogers as part of a revitalization effort.

ROGERS, Ark. – The Railyard Entertainment District is officially open!

The space is intended to attract visitors to downtown Rogers as part of a revitalization effort.

You can visit Railyard Park and explore the shops downtown.

The hiking trails at Lake Atalanta and the Railyard Bike Park are nearby.

There are limits in the Railyard Entertainment District where guests can consume alcoholic beverages outdoors within certain hours and in accordance with Arkansas law. These opening times are Monday to Friday, 4:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday, 10:00 a.m. – 10:00 p.m. Drinks must come from participating companies in the Railyard Entertainment District and be included in a compostable District Cup. The city will provide cups in designated collection bins in the region.

Companies participating in the Railyard Entertainment District have signs on their windows.

The town limits are signposted on footpaths and cycle paths.

Live concerts will be played on Fridays and Saturdays on the Butterfield Stage in Railyard Park starting June 5th. You can see the line-up and ticket information Here.

For more information on the Railyard Entertainment District, Click here.

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Name for an additional LR leisure district tabled for a month

Members of the Little Rock Board of Directors held back from creating another temporary entertainment district during a board meeting on Tuesday.

City Manager Dean Kumpuris supported the motion for a month to table a resolution creating an amusement district for al fresco dining near Third Street and the downtown River Market.

The motion was approved on a vote, with Vice Mayor Lance Hines presenting the second.

The Third Street Merchants Association had filed a motion in April to create the makeshift neighborhood, according to a memo from the city administrator’s office that was attached to the meeting papers.

According to the resolution text, the district should be approved retrospectively from May 20th to August 19th. The opening times would be daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

As listed, the boundaries would create an area roughly in the shape of a square around the intersection of East Second Street and River Market Avenues to the north and East Fourth Street in the west to Cumberland Street in the south.

The area includes dining options such as Dugan’s Pub, Dizzy’s Gypsy Bistro and the Copper Grill.

The memo from the city administrator’s office said that an outdoor seating area would be used by several restaurants nearby.

During the meeting, City Director Joan Adcock raised concerns about creating an entertainment district in the River Market area. She suggested holding the item until crime and caravans receded.

She said the end of school always increases traffic and problems in the river market area.

“I know the police are doing a great job right now to keep everything under control, but I have a real problem creating another entertainment district,” said Adcock.

Regarding the 14 officials assigned to the River Market, Adcock said she would hate to “see how we take on and water down what we do at the River Market by expanding the entertainment area at this point in time” .

She said officials had received letters from residents in the area expressing concerns about caravanning, crime and noise.

City Manager Bruce Moore noticed the existing entertainment district just a block away on River Market Avenue.

He said he believed the town was first approached by the owner of Dugan’s in collaboration with Gabe Holmstrom of the Downtown Little Rock Partnership.

Kumpuris said he believed Adcock was right. “We’re a little hasty with everything that’s going on down there,” he said.

However, he suggested that “in a very paradoxical way” the creation of the entertainment district could reduce the problems in the area as people will be out on the street making it more difficult to “get around” which seemed to be an indication of the subject of caravanning.

However, in light of what happened over the weekend, Kumpuris motioned to pass the measure for a month “to see how things go”.

Although he did not say which events he was referring to, Little Rock police are investigating two murders that occurred Friday night as part of two separate shootings.

In the first instance, police responded to the 1000 block of College Street to investigate a shootout that killed a 44-year-old woman and struck a man with gunfire.

Hours later, police investigated a gunfight at 2400 Marshall Street in which a 28-year-old man was found dead. Two other men were injured in the same shooting, one of them life-threatening, the police said.

Little Rock officials recently approved the expansion of two temporary entertainment areas: one in the Hillcrest neighborhood and the other on a section of Main Street south of Interstate 630 known as SoMa. The final operating date for each district is June 3 and June 18.

Temporary entertainment districts allow guests to purchase alcoholic beverages from specific establishments and consume the drink from open containers in public while wearing special wristbands.

At the end of Tuesday’s brief meeting, metropolitan director Antwan Phillips said he did not support the decision to postpone the creation of the temporary entertainment district, describing it as a quality of life issue.

“I understand and respect the people who emailed me who live downtown, but as a city, and for my friends who live downtown, these things are part of life downtown,” said Phillips.

Leisure district activity power invitations companies to their second assembly for perspective | KTAB

ABILENE, Texas (KTAB / KRBC) –The Entertainment District Task Force, looking at the pros and cons of enabling older adults to walk from the restaurant to the downtown venue with beer or wine in hand, met for the second time today.

They invited two business owners, one from the north and one from the south side, to get their perspective.

George Levesque, executive director of the Paramount Theater, says as more restaurants opened in downtown Abilene, he saw crowded parking lots and long waits for dinner.

“And then all of a sudden they deflate around 7 am, they all come to the top, come to a movie, and when they leave, guess what they’re doing? You keep going, ”said Levesque.

And they go to other bars and restaurants.

“I want to see one downtown and I want entertainment, restaurants and culture on both sides of the route,” said local developer Tim Smith.

Task force members asked Smith many questions about driver safety.

“My concern is to get back there safely so we don’t increase our DUI rates and DWI rates,” said a member of the task force.

They also raised concerns about underage alcohol consumption and excessive consumption.

“The cocktails are $ 10-14 a cocktail,” said Smith.

In Smith’s cocktail lounge, he says people aren’t there to get drunk.

“If you want the 99-cent booze, you’re in a different part of town and going to a different place,” Levesque said.

And since opening, Smith hasn’t had any major problems with over-consuming customers.

For this reason, he believes an open container rule is appropriate to meet the city’s long-term goals of promoting downtown businesses.

“If more happens downtown, more happens,” Levesque said.

Proposed youth leisure district slated for KC Parks Board consideration | FOX four Kansas Metropolis WDAF-TV

KANSAS CITY, MO – The Kansas City Board of Parks and Recreation Commissioners will hear a proposal to build a youth entertainment district on Tuesday.

Pat Clarke is the man behind the proposal. Clarke has basketball courts in Oak Park near 44th and in Benton where the signs say “Pat Clarke Park”.

“Obviously if you go to other parts of the city they have a lot more, so it would be more fun. I think it would be better if we had a lot more down here, ”said 17-year-old Carl Thompson while playing basketball with friends on Friday.

The Independence Center is extending the youth curfew to seven days a week after the shooting in the parking lot

Teenagers in town often flock to the Country Club Plaza or Independence Center for some rest. Everyone has had to either impose curfews or bans in an attempt to stop the fighting and other acts of violence that sometimes follow.

“There is nothing to do in the plaza except go shopping. So if you are down there and not shopping you are hanging out and most likely causing problems, ”said DaNearle Clarke.

But just a few miles east of Brush Creek are several acres of Kansas City Parks Department between the streets of Elmwood and Cleveland. Clarke plans to lease the land and build an entertainment center with a bowling alley, ice rink and skate park, amusement arcade and amphitheater.

“Our children race up and down (Highway) 71, drive donuts in the middle of intersections, cause chaos and shoot people. This place will cut into all of that. You give these kids something to do and reduce crime, ”said Clarke.

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He thinks if you give the teenagers a place where they feel wanted and have something to do, they are not going to cause the same problems.

The center would likely cost $ 2 million or more to build, but he has a unique plan to pay for it.

“If the Plaza wants their money back, give us some money. If Independence (Center) mall doesn’t want our kids out there, give us some money. Wherever our children are not wanted, we want to work with them, ”said Clarke.

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