Sergio Rossi Names Model Heroine Creative Director

MILAN — Sergio Rossi has appointed an Artistic Director recruited from the digital creative world.

Evangelie Smyrniotaki, best known online as the Style Heroine, will join the footwear specialist this month to oversee brand image and identity. She will get in touch Sergio Rossi CEO Riccardo Sciutto.

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In her role, the Athens-based Smyrniotaki will oversee advertising campaigns, content creation, styling and creativity, but will not be directly involved with shoe design on a day-to-day basis, although the company announced a special capsule collection called Evangelie Smyrniotaki x Sergio Rossi will be at of Milan Fashion Week in February. Seasonal collections are designed by the in-house team.

“It is a privilege to be with Sergio Rossi at this exciting time and I look forward to shaping a new chapter with the brand. I’ve been a long-time admirer and I firmly believe that the brand supported by Lanvin Group today has only just begun to express its potential,” said Smyrniotaki.

The appointment comes at a time of transition for the luxury footwear brand known for its feminine and decorative designs Fosun group took control of the company last June. fosun Group was renamed Lanvin Group last October and also includes the Lanvin, Wolford, St. John and Caruso brands.

“I am delighted with the arrival of Evangelie and I truly believe that her knowledge of the aesthetics and new media of luxury footwear will bring great value to the brand,” said Sciutto.

“Communication has changed a lot over these years and Evangelie summarizes the new numbers the industry needs; Nowadays, brands need to connect with customers and new communication tools – and I believe in creative management able to meet the needs of communities,” added the brand’s CEO.

On Instagram alone, the Greek digital content creator has more than 400,000 followers, drawn to her polished imagery and storytelling by new generation “it” girls. She has worked with brands and retailers such as Chanel, Prada, Versace and Mytheresa, among others. She ventured into the digital realm by starting the Style Heroine blog in 2011 at the dawn of the influencer scene.

The story goes on

In recent years, Sergio Rossi’s CEO has managed to reorganize the company, Modernization of its production facility in Italy’s San Mauro Pascoli, an important footwear district, and to give the product a precise identity, consistent with that of the brand late founder.

Last month, the shoe brand was unveiled as one of the tenants of Milan’s Spiga 26 real estate project, a move that coincides with the new owner’s commitment to invest in store openings. Sergio Rossi is moving from its current premises on Via Montenapoleone to join the new retail complex expected to open in Spring 2022.

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State lawmakers urge Ohio Medicaid director to designate Summa Well being a ‘distressed hospital’ and supply cash for hiring extra workers

CLEVELAND, Ohio – A group of state lawmakers sent a letter on Wednesday asking the Ohio Department of Medicaid for more resources for Summa Health to hire more nurses to alleviate care bottlenecks caused by a surge in coronavirus cases Omicron variant were caused.

The letter to Ohio Medicaid director Maureen Corcoran said Summa Health, which operates two hospitals in Akron and Barberton, should be viewed as a “distressed hospital” eligible for more state and federal aid to help more nurses to adjust. The hospital system manages nearly 60% of all emergency rooms in Summit, Stark, Portage, and Medina counties.

The eleven lawmakers, seven Republicans and four Democrats, urged Corcoran to allocate money from the US dollars passed by lawmakers that year to help coronavirus.

“The Summa health system is in a state of crisis,” the letter said. “We urge you to use the resources that we supported in HB 169 to create the necessary state labor incentives so that our region can cope with this crisis.”

Summa Health President and CEO Cliff Deveny said he was aware of the letter and was in regular contact with four counties’ lawmakers and state officials. The strain on Summa Health’s ability to care for patients – both with and without coronavirus – has been caused by two main factors.

“It really is a function of the exposure to the number of COVID patients,” he said. “They stay about twice as long as a typical patient, so they use up a lot more resources. Since everyone has a problem with staffing, we spend a lot more on bonuses, overtime and temporary work. “

In the letter from the legislature, the fluctuation rate in the care sector was highlighted, which is almost 15.6% and is thus well above the fluctuation rate of 9.4% in 2019 before the start of the pandemic.

HB 169 provided US $ 124 million for “hospitals with critical access, rural hospitals, or hospitals in distress,” according to Corcoran. Summa Health manages more than 68% of all inpatient care for Medicaid recipients in the four counties.

The hospital system is also so overloaded that 30% of inpatient beds are occupied by coronavirus patients. The hospital system paused dialing operations December 6, redirecting its staff to emergency, surgical and critical care. Emergency room patients wait an average of 48 hours before bed.

According to the letter, the hospital system also manages 35% of positive coronavirus cases in hospitals across the region, 49% of patients in intensive care units, and 58% of patients who require a ventilator.

“You are essentially at a turning point,” said US State Representative Casey Weinstein, a Hudson Democrat. “It’s a combination of a surge in COVID patients, the vast majority of whom are unvaccinated, which honestly means that I am close to tending to my constituents.”

State Rep. Bill Roemer, a Republican from Richfield, said he hoped the letter would convince Corcoran to send additional money to offset Summa’s cost of hiring temporary nurses.

“We need the right funding,” he said. “Summa spends $ 180 an hour on visiting nurses. That’s the problem. We want to make sure that we can attract, retain, and adequately pay the current workforce we have so that we can address the problem. “

Deveny didn’t speculate on what could happen without help, but said Summa would expect even more hospitalizations, the peaks of which tend to lag behind the daily case numbers. The state reported more than 12,800 newly confirmed coronavirus cases on Wednesday, beating the daily record of 12,500 set on Tuesday. The hospital brought refrigerated trucks in case they needed extra space in the morgue.

“We are anticipating a larger wave of patients than we have now,” said Deveny.

Cleveland.com/The Plain Dealer has contacted Corcoran and the Department of Medicaid for comment.

Read the letter:

Continue reading:

What’s driving the surge that has made Cuyahoga and neighboring counties the worst for rising COVID-19 cases?

“Overwhelmed” and “Exhausted” ERs – Cleveland Clinic University Hospitals provide an insight into the state of hospitals during the COVID-19 surge

How easy is it to find COVID-19 tests to use at home? Holidays are expected to increase the demand for home testing

Omicron accounts for 90% of Covid circumstances in some components of the U.S., CDC director says

A test tube labeled “COVID-19 Test Positive” can be seen in this illustration dated December 11, 2021 in front of the words “OMICRON SARS-COV-2”.

Given Ruvic | Reuters

The omicron Covid-19 variant has quickly overtaken Delta as the dominant strain of the virus in the US, accounting for 90% of cases in some parts of the country, said CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky on Wednesday.

The variant accounts for more than 73% of cases in the US on Saturday, according to the latest data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Last week, US health officials said Omicron accounted for 2.9% of all cases sequenced by December 11, but later revised that number to 12.6%.

Walensky said the highly mutated and contagious strain is responsible for up to 90% of infections in the eastern Atlantic states, parts of the Midwest, the southern and northern Pacific states.

“This rapid increase in the percentage of omicrons circulating across the country is similar to what we’ve seen around the world,” she told reporters during a press conference on Covid-19 at the White House.

This story evolves. Check again for updates.

CDC director on whether or not children ought to go trick-or-treating on Halloween

NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 31: A child dressed up as Wonder Woman for Halloween in Fort Green Park on October 31, 2020 in New York City. The CDC posted on its website alternative ways to safely celebrate the holiday. (Photo by David Dee Delgado / Getty Images)

David Dee Delgado | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Kids should be able to sweet or treat this Halloween with a few caveats, Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said on Sunday.

“I definitely hope so,” said Walensky on CBS’s “Face the Nation” when asked if it was safe for kids to trick or treat this year. “If you are able to be outside, absolutely,” she said.

The head of the CDC also recommended that parents and children limit the crowd on Halloween.

“I wouldn’t necessarily go to a crowded Halloween party, but I think we should let our kids go trick or treating in small groups,” Walensky said. “I hope we can do that this year.”

On Monday, Pfizer and BioNTech announced A smaller dose of their Covid-19 vaccine is safe and produces a “robust” immune response in a clinical study with children 5 to 11 years old.

Pfizer CEO and Chairman Albert Bourla said the data would soon be presented to the Food and Drug Administration.

“It’s a matter of days, not weeks” Bourla said in an interview on ABC’s “This Week”.

“Then it’s up to the FDA to review the data and come to its conclusions and whether or not to approve it,” said Bourla. “If they approve, we will be ready with our manufacturing to provide this new formulation of the vaccine.”

The vaccine for children ages 5-11 is “a third of the dose we give the rest of the population”.

Meanwhile, with most schools back on track, CDC’s Walensky told This Week that children who get the coronavirus primarily don’t get it while they are in school.

“Our science has actually shown that the disease generally comes from the community,” said Walensky. “If schools have an adequate containment and prevention strategy, their transmission doesn’t happen there.”

If proper security precautions are not taken in schools, transmission is much higher, the CDC chief said.

Most schools, 96%, stayed open that school year, Walensky said.

“Still, we also published a study from Arizona that showed that places where no masks were attached were three and a half times the risk of outbreaks than places where masks were attached,” Walensky said.

“We know how to protect them,” said Walensky. “And if we don’t use the right containment strategies, outbreaks are more likely and need to be closed.”

CDC director defends controversial name on Pfizer’s Covid boosters

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, insisted Friday that she did not override a vaccine advisory committee by getting approval from the CDC for Pfizers Covid boosters are supposed to accept a proposal that has been rejected by the committee.

In an unusual move, Walensky broke out of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which on Thursday voted 9 to 6 against approving vaccines for those in high-risk environments.

Walensky adopted the other recommendations of the panel Distribute third syringes to adults with pre-existing conditions and to anyone aged 65 and over. She said the final vote to release additional doses for teachers, health workers and other key employees was a “scientific scarcity”.

“I want to be very clear that I have not overridden an advisory committee,” said Walensky at a Covid briefing in the White House on Friday. “I have listened to all of the FDA advisory committee proceedings and listened carefully to this extraordinary group of scientists who spent hours publicly and very transparently on some of these very difficult questions and where the science stood.”

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, selected as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks during an event at The Queen Theater in Wilmington, Del., Tuesday, December 8, 2020.

Susan Walsh | AP

Walensky’s directive is closely based on that of the Food and Drug Administration Verdict on boosters Wednesday. This agency similarly defied the advice of its scientific advisory board by authorizing the recordings for a wider audience than it was advocating Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products.

“This was a scientific scarcity,” said Walensky, noting the lengthy two-day meeting and robust debate. “It was my call. If I had been in the room I would have voted yes.”

She tried to build public confidence by encouraging people to go back and listen to the committee’s deliberations. “We made it public, we made it transparent, and we did it with some of the best scientists in the country,” she added.

Dr. Paul Offit, an infectious disease doctor at Philadelphia Children’s Hospital and a voting member of the FDA’s advisory committee, turned down boosters for young people fearing they could cause myocarditis. Offit called Walensky’s expansion of the ACIP recommendation “a first,” adding that he felt Pfizer should have conducted more extensive booster studies before submitting its results to the FDA and CDC.

“As a healthy person under 30, I would wait and see how that goes,” Offit told CNBC. “Wait for a few million cans to get out of there.”

But with the US recording a seven-day average of 2,011 deaths per day on Thursday, 6% more than a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University, other doctors support Walensky’s decision.

Adjusting the panel’s guidelines was Walensky’s responsibility, even if it broke the precedent, said Dr. Arturo Casadevall, Chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“These committees are advisory,” said Casadevall. “Ultimately, this is a matter of policy, and politics requires judgment.”

President Joe Biden said at a briefing Friday that the CDC’s recommendation had widened the boosters to roughly 60 million Americans, including educators, health workers and supermarket employees. The broader booster criteria better protect frontline workers and account for the vaccine delivery inequalities that affect people of color, Walensky said.

“I am also aware of the disproportionate impact of this pandemic on racial and ethnic minority communities,” Walensky said. “Many of our frontline workers, key workers, and those in meeting places come from communities that are already hardest hit.”

She said denying these groups access to boosters will only exacerbate inequalities in the pandemic, which have caused black and Hispanic Covid patients to die more often than whites.

More than 55% of the US is fully vaccinated, and more than 2.4 million Americans have received boosters since the agency approved them for people with compromised immune systems on Aug. 13, according to the CDC.

Walensky said the agency will work to evaluate the booster data from Quickly Modern and Johnson & Johnson In the coming weeks.

“We intend to have numerous advisory boards at the CDC to review many pending decisions, including Moderna, J&J, and pediatric vaccinations,” said Walensky.

American Ballet Theatre government director on fall return after Covid halt

The American Ballet Theater – the country’s national ballet company – has announced that it will return to the stage in New York City this October, a year after indoor performances were suspended due to Covid.

“We can’t wait to see ABT in the Lincoln Center theaters that are our home,” Kara Medoff Barnett, ABT’s executive director, told CNBC “Worldwide exchange” on Friday. “We know our New York fans are excited to see ABT performers back on stage.”

ABT has just completed a cross-country tour that took 20 of its 84 dancers along with 28 support crews to eight different states. The company has performed at socially distant outdoor venues, and Barnett said it will learn from the protocols it developed this summer to ensure a safe indoor season this fall.

“We want to continue our commitment to the safety of our artists, staff and viewers,” said Barnett. “That was certainly the most important thing when we planned our outdoor tour to keep the audience out while we have the summer sun.”

American Ballet Theater dancers perform the company premiere of “La Follia Variations,” choreographed by Lauren Lovette and costumes by Victor Glemaud, during a dress rehearsal for the American Ballet Theater’s production of “Uniting in Movement” at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts, Costa Mesa on Thursday, April 22, 2021.

Leonard Ortiz | MediaNews Group | Orange County Register via Getty Images

Since its last fall season in 2019, ABT has had to cancel its personal appearances and switch to digital programs, like many ballet companies across the country and worldwide.

Barnett said the pandemic was a time of adaptation and learning for the entire company. “We always think, especially in the last year and a half, what is Plan B, Plan C,” she added. “We are agile in more ways than one.”

During Lincoln Center season, which occurs the last two weeks of October, performances may require proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test, depending on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The tickets will be refunded by 12 noon on the day of the performance if there are last-minute changes for spectators.

“We work very closely with our Lincoln Center venues. We work very closely with our medical advisor. And we are determined to find ways that we can continue the mission of this company, which has been bringing extraordinary art to audiences for 81 years.” can track. ” “Barnett told CNBC.

Performances this season include the classical ballet “Giselle” as well as three of the 22 works developed over the past year while the dancers have been divided into 11 creative bubbles.

“We’re bringing three of the works that were created in these residential bubbles to the New York audience to have their live premieres on stage,” said Barnett. “They had digital premieres, they had outdoor premieres all over the country – but now we’re bringing them to Lincoln Center.”

The “ABT Across America” ​​performances, which ended on Wednesday in New York City, were mostly free. But for a company that generated 36% of its revenue from ticket sales in 2018, the return of a full program is essential to future success and longevity.

Barnett isn’t worried about the recovery period and says she is very optimistic about the demand for live performances. “I think there is so much pent-up demand for the performing arts, so much pent-up demand for joint activities and experiences and the joy of celebrating together. In fact, I think we can assume we have the biggest audience we’ve had “seen in years.”

“We had 6,000 people, 8,000 people in these parks watching ballet under the stars,” added Barnett, referring to the cross-country tour. “I think the audience is ready, they missed us and they really want to come back.”

Not prudent to deploy vaccine boosters at this level: Ex-FDA director

There is currently insufficient evidence that Covid vaccine booster shots are required, according to a former FDA director.

“It is a good thing to be prepared to make boosters, but we really don’t have … evidence, at least in the United States, where we’re seeing vaccine failures or a decrease in immunity, so it’s time to put a booster on “said Norman Baylor, who previously worked for the US Food and Drug Administration’s Vaccine Research and Review Bureau.

Pharmaceutical company Pfizer is Development of a Covid booster vaccination or third dose to combat the highly transmissible Delta variant, which has become the dominant strain in many countries, including the United States

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the FDA said in a joint statement last week that “Americans who have been fully vaccinated currently don’t need a booster dose.”

Pfizer met with US officials on Monday to make his case for a third shot.

The company worked with a German company BioNTech Develop a vaccine consisting of two doses given three weeks apart. In December it received emergency approval from the World Health Organization.

No significant vaccination failure

The vaccine errors are currently very small with the vaccines currently in use. Until that changes, I don’t think it would be advisable to give a booster dose.

Norman Baylor

CEO of Biologics Consulting

Westbury, NY: A man receives the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine while at the Long Island State Qualified Health Center in Westbury, New York on April 29, 2021. (Photo by Steve Pfost / Newsday via Getty Images)

Steve Pfost | News day | Getty Images

He said health officials seem to agree that a third dose is not required.

“We’re just not there yet … we have no evidence that it is time to get a booster,” he said, adding that there may be new variations in the future that make current vaccines ineffective or much less effective.

Vaccination inequality

Richer countries have been able to vaccinate a large part of their population, while poorer countries lag behind.

The issue of vaccine disparity between regions needs to be addressed, Baylor said.

“A pandemic itself, the definition is that it is global,” he said, adding that he agreed with the World Health Organization that the crisis must be viewed from a global perspective.

Some countries and regions are actually ordering millions of booster doses before other countries have had supplies to vaccinate their health workers and those most at risk.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus

Director General, World Health Organization

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said Monday that the world is “in the midst of a growing two-pronged pandemic”.

“Some countries and regions are actually ordering millions of booster doses before other countries have had supplies to vaccinate their health workers and particularly vulnerable people.” he said during a press conference, adds that the world is Make “conscious choices” so as not to protect those most in need.

The data suggest the vaccines offer long-lasting immunity to severe and deadly Covid-19, he said.

“The priority now must be to vaccinate those who have received no doses and no protection,” said the WHO chief.

Biotech companies like Pfizer-BioNTech and Modern, which has developed another mRNA vaccine for Covid-19, must “do its utmost” to direct supply to places in need, including through the Covax vaccine distribution alliance, he added.

Leisure Information Roundup: Cannes director criticises rivals for permitting Netflix films in too simply; Raffaella Carra, Italian singer and TV presenter, dies at 78 and extra

The following is a summary of the latest entertainment news.

Box office: ‘F9’ rules on the 4th of July weekend as ‘Boss Baby 2’, ‘Zola’ has a strong start

It’s not going to be a weekend for the record books, but this year’s Christmas box office on July 4th is a significant improvement over the 2020 edition. The box office boost is thanks to a trio of new films, the kid-friendly “The Boss Baby: Family Business,” the gruesome thriller “The Forever Purge” and the satirical comedy “Zola”, each of which appeal to a completely different cinema audience. A number of holdovers, namely “F9: The Fast Saga” and “A Quiet Place Part II”, also support domestic revenue.

Swiss Alps, Sailboats are a magical decoration for Ibrahim Maalouf at the Montreux Jazz Festival

The French-Lebanese trumpeter Ibrahim Maalouf gave successive shows on a specially built floating stage at the Montreux Jazz Festival on Monday evening Lake Geneva for a limited number of fans with a COVID 19 free certificate. With the Swiss Alps and sailing boats as a breathtaking backdrop, he performed for the fourth time at one of the most renowned summer music festivals in Europe, which was canceled last year due to the pandemic.

Cannes director criticizes rivals for admission Netflix Movies too easily

The head of the Cannes The film festival attacked competing events on Monday, saying some were too quick to include movies from streaming giants in their main competitions without applying strict rules, thereby harming cinema. Platforms like Netflix flourished during the COVID-19 pandemic and won several top film awards while studios and cinemas struggled as coronavirus restrictions closed cinemas and pushed more viewers online.

Movie fans, vacationers mingle for COVID-conscious people Cannes come back

Movie stars will arrive armed with coronavirus tests and face masks Cannes from Tuesday for the return of the world’s largest film festival, which aims to help cinema recover from the blow of the global pandemic. Organizers and local authorities are relying on strict coronavirus protocols and testing to keep the event free of disruption as the French Government is stepping up warnings of growing cases of highly communicable COVID-19 delta Variant.

Raffaella Carra, Italian Singer and TV presenter, dies at the age of 78

Raffaella Carra, one of Italy’s most popular singers and TV presenter who became almost as famous in as a symbol of sexual liberation Spain and South America as in her own country, died on Monday at the age of 78. Italian prime minister Mario Draghi said Carra, “with her laughter and generosity she has accompanied generations of people Italian and took the name Italy around the world”.

(With contributions from agencies.)

New Wisconsin athletic director Chris McIntosh guarantees completely different fashion for various occasions | School sports activities

Blank called it an “excellent answer”.

“So I thought, this is really the person for the next 10, 20 years in Wisconsin,” she said.

Blank opened a nationwide search on April 7, appointing nine people to a search committee that met four times in closed sessions to discuss a pool of 35 applicants.

5 Things You Should Know About Chris McIntosh, the Next Wisconsin Sporting Director

Former UW assistant sports director Sean Frazier, now AD in Northern Illinois, said he interviewed himself for the position. Ball State sporting director Beth Goetz was also considered a finalist.

The final decision was made by Blank, who said any of the finalists could have been selected. McIntosh stood out from them, she said.

“Chris is a leader,” said Blank. “I am confident that he will build on Coach Alvarez’s legacy of success and make our alumni and fans across the state and around the world proud.”

Focus on academics

A native of Pewaukee, McIntosh played offensive line for the Badgers from 1996 to 1999 and was a first-round NFL draft pick. After his career as a player and jobs in the health and wellness industry, he joined the administration of the sports department in 2014. In July 2017 he was promoted to deputy sports director.

McIntosh is expected to make $ 940,000 annually on a five-year contract, according to a UW official. Of this, $ 500,000 is base salary and $ 440,000 from private donation funds dedicated to athletics held by the UW Foundation. Alvarez earned a combined $ 1.55 million annually.

Dan Aykroyd hails Ghostbusters: Afterlife director Jason Reitman | Leisure

Dan Aykroyd has described Jason Reitman as the “perfect” person to inherit the Ghostbusters franchise.

The 68-year-old actor founded the supernatural comedy franchise and returns to the role of Dr. for the upcoming Ghostbusters: Afterlife. Raymond Stantz back. The film is directed by Jason – the son of the original director Ivan Reitman – and Dan feels he is an ideal filmmaker to uphold the series’ legacy.

Dan told Cigar Aficionado, “Jason is the perfect heir to the legacy as a writer, storyteller and director.

“His vision derives seamlessly, respectfully and honestly from the original films. I can’t wait to see the lines around the multiplex.”

The new film shows a new generation of characters like the children Trevor (Finn Wolfhard) and Phoebe (Mckenna Grace) and their mother Callie (Carrie Coon). Original stars Bill Murray, Ernie Hudson, Sigourney Weaver and Annie Potts will also return as their respective characters, but Harold Ramis is absent after he passed away in 2014.

Jason previously stated that Ivan wept with joy the first time he saw Ghostbusters: Afterlife.

The 43-year-old director said, “My dad didn’t leave the house much because of COVID. But he did a test, put a mask on, and drove to the Sony parking lot to watch the film with the studio. And then he called and said, “I am so proud to be your father.”

“It was one of the great moments of my life.”

Reitman admits he felt discouraged about his first adventure in the horror genre.

He said, “The feeling that I’ve held onto is that while it’s very funny, it really scared me. It was really my first experience in a horror movie.

“I was at a Directors Guild meeting and happened to be sitting next to Steven Spielberg. When I told him I was working on Ghostbusters, he said out of nowhere, ‘Library Ghost – The Ten Greatest Horrors of All Time.’ And it’s true. “