Wilson County resident receives rip-off texts demanding cash

WILSON COUNTY, Tenn (WKRN) – Bodies, death threats, and cash demands. This week a resident of Wilson County received bizarre SMS that the sheriff’s office says are fake.

One of the messages read in the section “I’m an Assassin, I Was Sent to End Your Life” and “You have to make a payment of four thousand dollars so that I can cancel the contract of the person who sent me.”

Detective Justin Cagle pointed out the poor grammar, misspellings, and poor punctuation in the texts as signs that the news is fake.

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Detective Cagle also noted that the photo the scammer contained, alluding to the fact that they killed someone, was actually a screenshot from a recent news story in which the deputy of the San Diego Sheriff passed out after he passed out during a drug downturn Has been exposed to fentanyl.

“The first thing we suggest is that they block the number and not respond to any of the messages at all,” said Cagle.

The number that texted the victims was listed as (501) 415-3676. It is important to know that the Sheriff’s Office says a lot of these scams are likely to be from overseas and the number can be manipulated.

If something doesn’t seem right, Cagle says it’s probably not right. He wants to remind people never to give out personal information or money without verifying a situation or contacting law enforcement.

“If it sounds a little lazy, don’t do anything. Ask somebody. Contact us, ”said Cagle.

Chester Man Shocked by Armed Intruders in His Driveway Demanding Cash: PD – NBC Connecticut

An investigation is underway after police said a Chester man was surprised in his driveway by armed intruders demanding money early Sunday morning.

Police said the two armed intruders were demanding money and possibly trying to steal a vehicle from a resident of a house on Goose Hill Road.

According to officers, shots were fired by the intruders as they fled the scene. No injuries were reported, but authorities said the homeowner was understandably shaken.

Investigators have been called in and the Connecticut State Police Department of Serious Crimes has taken control. Evidence was gathered at the scene and the incident is being “aggressively investigated,” police said.

Similar incidents were also reported this morning in Tylerville and Westbrook, which authorities say may involve the same criminals.

DEA warns scammers are impersonating brokers, demanding cash for faux drug busts

DETROIT – The Drug Enforcement Administration warns the public of a widespread fraud program in which phone scammers impersonate DEA agents to extort money or steal personal information.

The federal office says there are different variations in the scheme. Scammers could try to convince victims that their name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large amount of drugs.

The caller then has the victim check their social security number or inform them that their bank account has been compromised.

In other cases, the scammer threatens the target with fictitious drug seizure arrest and calls the individual to send money by gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to help investigate or reset their bank account.

Part of an actual scam call was captured by DEA and can be heard Here. The public can also check out the PPE below to help raise awareness that the DEA will never ask for money or ask for personal information over the phone.

“Our office receives 3 to 5 calls a month from people around the country, often soon after they have called these scammers,” said Keith Martin, special agent for the Detroit Field Division. “DEA employees will never phone members of the public or doctors to ask for money or any other form of payment.

“DEA will never solicit personal or sensitive information over the phone and will only notify people in person or by official letter of a legitimate investigation or legal action. In fact, no legitimate federal law enforcement officer is going to ask for cash or gift cards from a member of the public. “

The DEA says scammers have gone so far as to forge legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call is legitimate, or text photos of what appears to be a legitimate law enforcement card with a photo on it.

Other common tactics scammers will use, according to the DEA, include:

  • Use an urgent and aggressive tone and refuse to speak to or leave a message with anyone other than the victim.
  • threats to arrest, prosecute, detain and, in the case of doctors and pharmacists, to withdraw their DEA registration;
  • Claim thousands of dollars by wire transfer or untraceable gift card numbers for the victim to provide over the phone.
  • ask for personal information such as social security number or date of birth;
  • When calling a doctor, refer to national provider numbers and / or state license numbers. You can also claim that patients are making allegations against this practitioner.

Imitating a federal agent is a violation of federal law that can be punished with a prison sentence of up to three years. In the case of escalated identity theft, a prison sentence of at least two years plus fines and reimbursement is imposed.

DEA Warns of Phone Scammers Impersonating Brokers and Demanding Cash – Pasadena Now

The Drug Enforcement Administration warned late last week that phone scammers were posing as DEA agents with the aim of extorting money or stealing personal information.

A new public announcement says the DEA will never call to ask for money or ask for personal information.

There are differences in the false narrative, including that the target’s name was used to rent a vehicle that was stopped at the border and contained a large amount of drugs, the DEA said.

The caller then has the target verify their social security number or claim that their bank account has been compromised.

In some cases, the caller threatens the target with fictitious drug seizure arrest and instructs the person over the phone to send money by gift card or wire transfer to pay a “fine” or to help investigate or reset their bank account.

In addition, scammers have “forged” legitimate DEA phone numbers to convince their target that the call was legitimate – or text photos of what appear to be legitimate law enforcement cards with a photo.

Reported scam tactics are constantly changing, but they often share many of the same characteristics. Callers use fake names and ID numbers, as well as names of known DEA officers or police officers in local departments.

Anyone who receives a call from someone claiming to be with DEA ​​should report the incident to the FBI at www.ic3.gov.

Additionally, the Federal Trade Commission offers recovery steps, shares information with more than 3,000 law enforcement agencies, and accepts reports reportfraud.ftc.gov.

For more information about identity theft protection, see www.identitytheft.gov.

Reporting these scam calls helps federal agencies find, arrest, and stop the criminals involved in this scam.

Imitating a federal agent is a violation of federal law that can be punished with a prison sentence of up to three years. In the case of escalated identity theft, a prison sentence of at least two years plus fines and reimbursement is imposed.

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