Fauci defends FDA panel determination to reject third doses for all People

The leading expert on infectious diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, responds to allegations made by Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) as he testifies before the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC on July 20, 2021.

J. Scott Applewhite | Swimming pool | Reuters

Dr. Anthony Fauci defended the Decision of the Board of the Food and Drug Administration refuse to offer a third booster shot PfizerBioNTech Covid-19 vaccine for the general US population.

“I don’t think you made a mistake,” the White House chief medical officer told CNN’s State of the Union on Sunday.

Fauci added that he would support a third dose if future data shows it is effective. As the FDA continues to gather new information about boosters, persuading unvaccinated Americans to get vaccinated remains a priority.

Fauci’s comments come after the FDA advisory committee on Friday Voted against giving third shots of Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine to all Americans, although she recommended booster doses for people aged 65 and over and those with underlying medical conditions.

The FDA panel’s decision added to the confusion over the booster dose after President Joe Biden said last month that boosters would be available to all Americans starting the week of September 20th.

“I understand why there might be confusion because I think people have not understood the difference between planning something and actually not understanding what element of it, what portion of it is actually being introduced, and that’s exactly what happened,” he said “Meet the Press” from NBC.

He later told ABC’s This Week that the government had set the September 20 deadline as a wildcard, depending on input from the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The plan was that we have to be ready to do this as soon as a decision is made,” he said. “And when you have a plan, put a date on it and say, ‘We want to be able to prepare for the week of September 20th'” “

Current data from Israel indicates the effectiveness of the vaccine As time decreases, a third shot of Pfizer could restore infection protection to 95% six months after a second dose.

As of September 18, more than 181 million Americans were fully vaccinated. Nationwide, more than 670,000 people have died of Covid-19.

Data on boosters from Modern and Johnson & Johnson is expected in the coming weeks, said Fauci. He also said “This Week” that there will “certainly” be a vaccine for children this fall.

Florida Choose Weighs Resolution To Reinstate Federal Unemployment Cash Suspended By Gov. DeSantis In June – CBS Miami

TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami / NSF) – A Leon County district judge rushed into a lawsuit on Wednesday over whether Governor Ron DeSantis’s government violated state law by withdrawing unemployment benefits from tens of thousands of unemployed Floridians in June Federal deleted.

Judge Layne Smith heard testimony from plaintiffs who said the decision to end the $ 300 a week in federal benefits resulted in them having difficulty paying housing and other expenses. As part of the COVID-19 aid, the federal government provided the money in addition to the state’s maximum unemployment benefits of $ 275 per week.

CONTINUE READING: Poll: Majority of Floridians Disapprove of Governor DeSantis’ Response to COVID-19

The lawsuit alleges that payments should have continued through September 6, as approved by Congress, and that the unemployed should receive retroactive payments through June 26. The money comes from a federal funding law commonly known as the CARES law.

Plaintiffs attorneys say the DeSantis government has violated a state law directing the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to work with the US Department of Labor and take action “by adopting appropriate rules, administrative methods, and standards that are necessary for the state ”. all advantages according to the federal regulations on re-employment (unemployment) assistance. “

“The governor and the DEO (the Department of Economic Opportunity) have no discretion as to whether or not to accept the money,” said Marie Mattox, plaintiff’s attorney.

However, Daniel Nordby, an attorney for the DeSantis administration, denies the state needs to provide the additional services.

“Florida law quite simply does not require participation in the CARES Act programs that were passed by Congress,” Nordby said. “Neither federal nor Florida law requires participation.”

Smith, who is contemplating plaintiffs’ motion for an injunction, said repeatedly that he would not address the political issues surrounding the suspension of federal payments. He said he needed to focus on the details of state and federal laws.

“The bottom line is it’s a legal construction case,” said Smith.

Plaintiffs, who testified on Wednesday, described economic troubles during the pandemic, made worse by the state cutting $ 300 a week in federal payments.

For example, Harriett Rubin, a 68-year-old Broward County resident who has been unemployed since the pandemic began, said she put a tax lien on her home because she couldn’t pay property taxes.

“To worry about your apartment or whether your air conditioning is on and working, and can I bring some food into the house. That little bit of money helps, ”said Rubin.

Will Currie, chief financial officer of the Department of Economic Opportunity, testified that in the spring of 2020, the state began providing the additional federal benefits – known as Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation or FPUC benefits – to provide assistance as the pandemic was major economic Caused problems and an increase in unemployment.

But the state decided to stop the services that summer as vacancies remained unfilled. Many companies have argued in recent months that they cannot find enough workers.

“The idea was to add the weekly benefit that was believed to be

Incentivizing people not to return to work, ”Currie said.

But Mattox said the people who need the extra money aren’t “free riders” who don’t want to be hired.

“DeSantis decided to cut those benefits because he said it was keeping people from going back to work,” Mattox said. “Research just doesn’t confirm that.”

MORE NEWS: Governor Ron DeSantis continues to double his stance on masks in schools

(© 2021 CBS Local Media. All rights reserved. You may not publish, broadcast, rewrite, or redistribute this material. The Florida News Service of Jim Saunders and Tom Urban contributed to this report.)

Decide Weighs DeSantis Administration Choice To Halt Unemployment Cash

TALLAHASSEE — A Leon County district judge on Wednesday looked into a lawsuit over whether Governor Ron DeSantis’s government violated state law by cutting federal unemployment benefits for tens of thousands of unemployed Floridians in June.

Judge Layne Smith heard testimony from plaintiffs who said the decision to end the $ 300 a week in federal benefits resulted in them having difficulty paying housing and other expenses. As part of the COVID-19 aid, the federal government provided the money in addition to the state’s maximum unemployment benefits of $ 275 per week.

The DeSantis government stopped the additional federal benefits on Jan.

The lawsuit alleges that payments should have continued through September 6, as approved by Congress, and that the unemployed should receive retroactive payments through June 26. The money comes from a federal funding law commonly known as the CARES law.

Plaintiffs attorneys say the DeSantis government has violated a state law directing the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity to work with the US Department of Labor and take action “by adopting appropriate rules, administrative methods, and standards that are necessary for the state ”. all advantages according to the federal regulations on re-employment (unemployment) assistance. “

“The governor and the DEO (the Department of Economic Opportunity) have no discretion as to whether or not to accept the money,” said Marie Mattox, plaintiff’s attorney.

However, Daniel Nordby, an attorney for the DeSantis administration, denies the state needs to provide the additional services.

“Florida law quite simply does not require participation in the CARES Act programs that were passed by Congress,” Nordby said. “Neither federal nor Florida law requires participation.”

Smith, who is contemplating plaintiffs’ motion for an injunction, said repeatedly that he would not address the political issues surrounding the suspension of federal payments. He said he needed to focus on the details of state and federal laws.

“The bottom line is it’s a legal construction case,” said Smith.

The judge said he was likely to give a verdict on Friday. However, he added that he expects his decision to be appealed.

Plaintiffs, who testified on Wednesday, described economic troubles during the pandemic, made worse by the state cutting $ 300 a week in federal payments.

For example, Harriett Rubin, a 68-year-old Broward County resident who has been unemployed since the pandemic began, said she put a tax lien on her home because she couldn’t pay property taxes.

“To worry about your apartment or whether your air conditioning is on and working, and can I bring some food into the house. That little bit of money helps, ”said Rubin.

Will Currie, chief financial officer of the Department of Economic Opportunity, testified that in the spring of 2020, the state began providing the additional federal benefits – known as Federal Pandemic Unemployment Compensation or FPUC benefits – to offer assistance on how the pandemic caused major economic benefits Problems and an increase in unemployment.

But the state decided to stop the services that summer as vacancies remained unfilled. Many companies have argued in recent months that they cannot find enough workers.

“The idea was to add the weekly benefit that was believed to be

Incentivizing people not to return to work, ”Currie said.

But Mattox said the people who need the extra money aren’t “free riders” who don’t want to be hired.

“DeSantis decided to cut those benefits because he said it was keeping people from going back to work,” Mattox said. “Research just doesn’t confirm that.”

‘Placing their cash the place their mouth is’: This is what three analysts should say about Coinbase’s choice so as to add $500 million of crypto to its stability sheet | Foreign money Information | Monetary and Enterprise Information

Coinbase Co-Founder and CEO Brian Armstrong

Coin base announced on Thursday that it was Add $ 500 million in cryptocurrency to its balance sheet while at the same time 10% of its quarterly net income is allocated to a portfolio of crypto assets. Insider gathered insights from three Coinbase analysts to help understand the move.

“I like that they put their money where their lips are,” said Mizuho analyst Dan Dolev.

He told Insiders that Coinbase is still heavily fiat money for a company with crypto headquarters for its business. This move changes that, although Dolev would like the exchange to go a step further and charge customer transaction fees in crypto rather than dollars.

“That would signal even more commitment to the cryptocurrency,” said Dolev.

Coinbase CFO Alesia Haas admitted that the majority of Coinbase’s financial transactions – like paying sellers and employees or investing company money – on a Friday are “heavily weighted” in fiat blog entry. But she said Coinbase wants to lead by example by enabling the adoption and use of crypto, and that investment is a step towards that goal.

“We believe that more and more companies will keep crypto assets on their balance sheets in the future,” said Haas. “We hope that by incorporating more crypto assets into our own corporate financial practices, we can take another step towards a more open crypto economy.”

Chris Kuiper, a CFRA stock research analyst, reiterated Dolev’s comment that the announcement shows Coinbase’s commitment to the cryptocurrency industry. Kupier maintained his “Buy” rating on Coinbase after it was announced that he was broadly positive on the stock.

However, adding crypto to Coinbase’s balance sheet adds an additional layer of risk as the company’s share price is already tied to the price and trading activity of Bitcoin, Chris Brendler, senior research analyst at DA Davidson, told Insider. The Coinbase share often moves in parallel with the Bitcoin price.

“That won’t necessarily make or destroy the company,” Brendler told Insider. “But it’s certainly a little scary when you put money into one of those commodities that you’re already pretty closely connected with.”

Part of this risk is offset by a cash balance of $ 4 billion that Coinbase is building in anticipation of a “crypto winter” and possible regulatory action, said Kupier.

Brendler added that since Coinbase is so tied to crypto, Coinbase will need to have more cash than other high-growth non-crypto companies in case there is a “crypto winter” or a prolonged period of low crypto prices and activity.

Tyra Banks discusses Victoria’s Secret resolution to retire their Angels | Leisure

Tyra Banks believes she is “experiencing a beauty revolution” after Victoria’s Secret retired her angels.

The 47-year-old model is pleased that the “bada ** Role Models” are taking on their new positions at The VS Collective, which consists of speakers such as actress Priyanka Chopra, model and skier Eileen Gu, plus-size beauty Paloma Elsesser and the Brazilian model Valentina Sampaio.

Celebrating the news, Tyra wrote, “I retired from the catwalk 16 years ago and I’m proud to be witnessing a beauty revolution in my life. I may have broken this door open for the new collective of tough ROLE models.” , but you all storm through. Keep doing this until we all LOSE COUNT how many break through behind you. #LetsLoseCount. (sic) “

Tyra worked as a contract model with the brand, the first black model to do so.

In a post on Instagram, she added, “The first is critical so a door can be opened so others can pass through. In 10 years from 1995, I was the first ever black @VictoriasSecret contract model Victoria’s Secret cover model. The first Black VS model to do so many other groundbreaking things to the brand – and other brands too. But after a premiere there has to be a stream of more. A stream of others. A stream of unique things. A flow so strongly, a stream of so many, that we LOSE COUNTING. (sic) “

Victoria’s Secret confirmed the changes in a statement earlier this week.

Their CEO, Martin Waters, said, “At Victoria’s Secret, we are on an incredible journey to become the world’s leading advocate for women. This is a dramatic change for our brand and a change that we embrace from our core. These new initiatives are just the beginning. We are full of energy and humility from the work that lies ahead. “

Hamilton determination paves means for brand new leisure complicated to open sooner: What to know

ExploreThe owners of a new Hamilton building are planning a beach-themed tiki bar and entertainment center on the Great Miami River

Instead of objecting to an alcohol permit at the beginning of the process, the city can instead prevent a facility from opening by denying a building permit or a food operator license. In this case, “the permit will not be granted,” said Vanderhorst.

He noted that a seemingly simple transfer of an alcohol permit to Hamilton’s Parks Conservancy for the two municipal golf courses has not yet been approved by the state. The conservatory took over the courses in February 2020, he said.

“I hope that in such cases you will see far fewer objections to the new permits,” Vanderhorst told the city council.

“I think it’s fantastic,” said Matt Pater, owner of the Hamilton Landing under construction, who thanked both Vanderhorst and City Manager Joshua Smith. “I know they are busy and, frankly, they take as much time as they do to speak to my lawyer.” … It meant a lot to me. “

Father asked them not to object to the approval of the property, which is gradually being opened. An outdoor beach bar will open first, followed by indoor banquet and restaurant facilities. “I said it took me six months to get this far. I applied that day and went to see the Knights of Columbus building, ”said Father.

“I said, ‘If I have to start again, I’ll lose the summer,” he said of hopes of opening the outdoor bar relatively soon.

Two couples (from left) Andy and Jennifer Barlow and Matt Pater and his fiancée Julie Ferguson are planning the opening of the Hamilton Landing entertainment complex in the former Knights of Columbus building on Pyramid Hill Boulevard. MIKE RUTLEDGE / STAFF

The crews work on outdoor bars along the Great Miami River that don’t require building permits.

The attorney sent city officials his interpretation of state law on the matter. “They contacted me later that day and said, ‘Hey, I think we can handle this. ‘Apparently they are changing the way they do it.Now it goes on for everyone. “

“For them it meant being adaptable and seeing a new way of doing things and integrating them, the world for me,” said Father. “Our plan is to open part of the summer with our outdoor area. We wouldn’t be able to do that if we had to start again from first place. “

ExploreDowntown Living: Hamilton’s urban areas are growing in popularity as options grow

CDC panel postpones pause determination

Pharmacist Madeline Acquilano vaccinates a teacher with the Johnson & Johnson Covid-19 vaccine at Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut on March 3, 2021.

Joseph Precious | AFP | Getty Images

A panel of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention decided on Wednesday to postpone a decision on Johnson & Johnson’s Covid-19 vaccine after six women developed a rare but potentially life-threatening bleeding disorder that left one dead and critical Condition left behind.

The CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices met the day after the Food and Drug Administration States requested temporarily “Out of caution”, stop using J & J’s vaccine. The panel unanimously voted to meet in a week’s time to decide what to recommend to the CDC about J & J’s vaccine. The postponement means the pause for J & J’s vaccine will remain in place.

The committee debated whether and how long they wanted to continue the hiatus on J & J’s vaccine while the CDC investigates the cause of the clotting. One committee member recommended a month’s hiatus from restarting vaccinations, while other members recommended a few weeks. Some members asked if they could hold the vote on hold until they had more time to process the data.

One of the options the panel considered was whether to recommend restricting vaccine use based on age or other risk factors.

Dr. Grace Lee, a member of the committee, said she feared a vote to suspend the use of the vaccine indefinitely would send the wrong message to the public. She and others added it might appear that something is fundamentally wrong with the vaccine.

“This is not the decision that I think makes the most sense,” she said.

Sandra Fryhofer of the American Medical Association advocated taking a break. She said there are enough supplies of Moderna and Pfizer vaccines to keep the rapid vaccinations going in the US

“I know there are a lot of patients who couldn’t be vaccinated and need to be vaccinated, but we want to make sure these vaccines are safe,” she said.

Dr. Nirav Shah, the director of the CDC in Maine, said the committee’s vote to postpone a decision on how to use the vaccine was “equivalent to a decision”.

“Any extension of the hiatus will invariably result in the most vulnerable people in the US, who were the lead candidates for the J&J vaccine, remain at risk. The most at risk remain at risk.”

The CDC and FDA advised states to postpone appointments for J&J vaccines after six women developed cerebral sinus thrombosis (CVST) within about two weeks of receiving the shot, U.S. health officials told reporters Tuesday. CVST is a rare form of stroke that occurs when a blood clot forms in the venous sinuses of the brain. It can eventually leak blood into the brain tissue and cause bleeding.

“CVST is rare but clinically severe and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality,” said Dr. Tom Shimabukuro, a CDC official, told the committee. He said CVST cases in the J&J vaccine group appeared to be three times higher than in women aged 20 to 50 with similar backgrounds.

Within hours of the FDA’s warning early Tuesday, more than a dozen states as well as some national pharmacies did suspended vaccinations With the J&J vaccine, some are replacing scheduled appointments with either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine.

U.S. health officials had said the break in using the vaccine could only be a few days, depending on what they learned when investigating the cases. The Chief Medical Officer of the White House, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday the hiatus in vaccine use would give U.S. health officials a chance the time it takes them to thoroughly investigate the cases and “find some common denominator among the women who were involved.”

A 25-year-old male developed CVST along with bleeding during the clinical trial who was hospitalized but recovered. All six cases that appeared after the clinical trial were found in white women, Shimabukuro said, noting that the median time to symptoms was eight days. Three were described as obese, one had hyperthyroidism, one had asthma, and one had high blood pressure, he said.

Five of the six patients developed headaches initially and one had back pain and bruising before developing more serious other symptoms, he said. One of the women died. Three of the patients are staying in the hospital while two have been discharged, he said.

“These are significant blood clots that are causing these problems,” he said.

Dr. Aaran Maree, chief physician of the vaccines division at J&J, Janssen Pharmaceutical Cos., Told the committee that none of the women had birth control, which has been suggested as a possible association with blood clotting. They all also tested negative for Covid-19.

One of the two patients who recovered was a 26-year-old woman who was described as “overweight but active”, who was not on medication, and had no history of bleeding disorders.

She was hospitalized and discharged with a severe headache a week after receiving the J&J vaccine, but returned to the hospital a week later with abdominal pain and a fast heart rate, he said. Tests showed that she developed thrombocytopenia and CVST.

A 48-year-old woman with an “unremarkable medical history” was admitted to the hospital after three days with malaise and abdominal pain. She developed severe thrombocytopenia and CVST which, despite treatment with the blood-thinning heparin, progressed to a hemorrhagic stroke. She received the J&J vaccine two weeks before symptoms began and is still critically ill, according to the latest report.

Supreme Courtroom’s Fb Resolution Impacts TCPA Litigation – Media, Telecoms, IT, Leisure

United States:

The Facebook Supreme Court ruling affects TCPA litigation

April 05, 2021

Holland & Knight

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The US Supreme Court unanimously ruled that the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA) only covers random calls and text messages to cell phones from an automatic telephone dialing system (ATDS).

The decision in Facebook, Inc. v Duguid et al.The April 1, 2021 ruling overturned a U.S. appeals court ruling for the ninth circuit where the appeals court broadly defined the type of automatic telephone dialing system covered by the TCPA. The Supreme Court’s narrow interpretation of the autodialer definition and its applicability to new technologies is a significant asset to the defense. The decision is expected to significantly reduce the number of class action lawsuits under this law.

The Supreme Court agreed with Facebook’s interpretation that an autodialer under the law does not apply to technology used by Facebook and other companies that use similar technologies. The opinion of Justice Sonia Sotomayor states that “[a]
necessary function of an autodialer under [the TCPA] is the ability to use a random or sequence number generator to store or produce phone numbers to be called. “Facebook argued that the company was sending targeted texts to phone numbers already in its database, so the TCPA did not apply.

The aversion to robocalls and texts is a rare bipartisan topic. The decision can open the door for Congress to pass laws that update the 1992 law to cover new technologies or pass laws that apply to technologies used by companies like Facebook. Some states also have TCPA-like laws that set their own restrictions on automated dialing and text messaging. It is therefore important for businesses to assess the state-level restrictions before making changes based on the Supreme Court decision.

The content of this article is intended to provide general guidance on the subject. A professional should be consulted about your particular circumstances.

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Massachusetts senator desires to let student-athletes earn cash from third-party endorsements as NCAA pushes off determination

While March Madness brings in more than $ 1.1 billion in revenue for top universities and college sports regulators, Senator Barry Finegold says it’s time to give athletes a piece of the pie.

“Who are the real winners?” Finegold, a Democrat from Andover, asks about the lucrative business of college sports.

In 2019, college sports programming raised $ 18.9 billion through ticket sales, television deals, clothing stores, and merchandise sales, according to the NCAA. Some of the money goes to schools, where it covers the salaries of six-figure coaches and state-of-the-art stadiums, but none of that goes into players’ pockets as per NCAA rules.

It’s a funding formula that Finegold – once an amateur soccer player himself – says it’s time to change. This is the second term that Finegold has tabled its bill to legalize endorsements for physical education students in Massachusetts. However, he says this is more relevant today than ever.

“There’s a lot of talk about justice and fairness right now – most of these athletes have lower socio-economic status,” Finegold told the Herald in a recent interview. “In D1, high-priced recruits make all this money for these schools and what is the ultimate benefit? So many drop out of school early, not getting the full benefit from college and hoping for professional careers, but that can be a tough road to hacking. ”

Finegold’s bill would allow student-athletes to receive compensation for using their name, image, or likeness without affecting the student’s eligibility – something that is currently not allowed under NCAA rules. College players could also participate in professional sport drafting without compromising their college status and gaming ability, and would allow them to keep scholarships. It also allows student-athletes to hire agents and would set up a “Catastrophic Sports Injury Fund” to compensate student-athletes who suffer retirement injuries.

The latest NCAA data shows that the graduation rate among athletes has slowly increased over the past two decades. Around 90% of athletes who started college in 2013 have graduated. However, according to the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport, there is still a significant racial gap in graduation rates for black athletes, with graduation of about 73% last year.

Public support to provide student-athletes with name, image, and likeness opportunities has increased in recent years. The NCAA itself has now committed to changing the rules as a patchwork of state laws emerges. Finegold’s bill is modeled on California’s Fair Pay to Play Act, which was passed by lawmakers in 2019. Florida passed a similar bill last year.

“The NCAA is best positioned to offer a consistent and fair approach to name, image and likeness to all athletes at the national level,” the organization said in a statement. A vote in January to pass a new set of rules that extends the rules for names, image and likeness to athletes was postponed indefinitely.

The NCAA Board of Governors backed rule changes last April to allow athletes to receive compensation for third-party endorsements. The then chairman of the NCAA Board of Governors, Michale V. Drake, described the issue of endorsement for sports students as “uncharted territory” at the time.