Former physician for John Muir Well being says hospitals put cash forward of affected person security, cites baby’s loss of life

A former John Muir Health doctor alleges in a lawsuit that the nonprofit group, which operates hospitals in Walnut Creek and Concord, put money ahead of patient safety and ignored her warnings about surgical hazards that have resulted in illness and death.

Hospital officials dismissed the claims made by Dr. Alicia Kalamas in a lawsuit filed Wednesday in Contra Costa County Superior Court.

Kalamas, who worked at John Muir Health for eight years, said she has repeatedly raised red flags at executives about improper surgical practices, only to be ignored because she was viewed as a woman with “sharp elbows” or because officials feared that Changes that would signal past practices were dangerous.

In one example, she said she warned officials not to authorize complicated surgery on a child and told them other regional hospitals were better prepared to perform the surgery. But because the hospital group’s executives wanted to build a children’s brand, they ignored her concerns, she claims in the lawsuit. Surgeons from John Muir Health performed the surgery and the child died.

In their response to that claim, John Muir Health officials said Kalamas was not directly involved in the case and could not assess the “significant risks” of continuing or not having the surgery.

Kalamas, 50, of Piedmont, sued the nonprofit and its two top executives, Cal Knight, CEO of John Muir Health, and Taejoon Ahn, president and CEO of John Muir Medical Group, alleging the group violated its contract and forced her out of her position after labeling her a troublemaker.

“People at the top of the organization have lost their way,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “They care more about the bottom line than patient safety.”

John Muir Medical Center on Wednesday, January 12, 2022 in Walnut Creek, California.

Santiago Mejia / The Chronicle

dr Russell Rodriguez, chief medical officer at John Muir Health, said that any feedback from employees is appreciated and that before executives decided not to renew Kalamas’ contract, they decided to restructure the program she administered to include “the better meet today’s patient needs”.

“The fact that the clinical consensus can differ from an individual physician’s views does not mean that he or she has been ignored,” Rodriguez said in a statement to The Chronicle. “Despite efforts to offer coaching and other support, Dr. Kalama’s reality and something she found difficult to understand and accept.”

He said that senior executives make patient safety their number one priority, noting that all the money John Muir Health makes is reinvested in the healthcare system.

Kalamas specializes in anesthesiology with a focus on perioperative medicine, which ensures that the many factors that influence surgical success – before, during and after an operation – are properly managed. In 2013, Kalamas was recruited from UCSF to join John Muir Health as medical director of the perioperative medicine program.

She quickly sought to fix the hospitals’ readmission rate for the highest-volume surgeries, which the lawsuit said was higher than the region’s 6.9% rate.

Her research found a simple problem, she says. When prescribing opiates as pain relievers after surgery, particularly for knee and hip replacements, there was no protocol to educate and provide medication to prevent constipation, resulting in patients returning to the hospital for a variety of issues.

“Millions of dollars were paid to JMH for failing to provide their patients with a 50-cent over-the-counter stool softener, a glass of water, and some basic advice,” Kalamas alleges in her lawsuit.

After her changes were implemented, the hospital saw a 27% decrease in readmissions for joint replacements, reducing costs for medical providers and taxpayers, she says.

Kalamas dealt with postoperative wound infections. Patients who have developed such infections are 60% more likely to be admitted to the ICU and five times more likely to be readmitted research. Yearly such problems costs the US health care system $3.5 to $10 billion.

In the past, John Muir Health has earned revenue from such complications and billed patients for the additional treatment, the lawsuit says. However, the federal government began to force the hospital to pay millions of dollars Punish, says Kalamas, eventually forcing it to improve. Still, Kalamas says executives and others ignored numerous emails she sent warning them that the lack of pre- and post-surgery blood glucose monitors was harming and killing patients.

The lawsuit cites an example of a diabetic who required a second operation after an infection. His heart wasn’t strong enough and he suffered a massive heart attack at home in front of his wife on the first day and later died, according to the lawsuit. Another young patient with kidney failure and diabetes did not have her blood sugar controlled and died shortly after receiving anesthesia; Her blood sugar was high when she coded, Kalamas says.

Rodriguez, John Muir’s chief medical officer, said eliminating postoperative wound infection is a “critical focus” and that restructuring the perioperative program will further reduce infections.

“Peroperative services needed to be made available to a larger proportion of the operated population, and care needed to be extended beyond the clinical setting,” he said.

Kalamas said her whistleblowing and criticism as a woman was bothersome or, as one manager told her, developed a reputation for “sharp elbows”.

“I’ve been in other institutions … and I’ve never felt dismissed,” Kalamas told The Chronicle. “I felt like at John Muir Health I was warning of very serious health and safety concerns and no one was paying attention.”

When she found out about the young child’s planned surgery, it fell outside of her area of ​​responsibility at the hospital, but she felt compelled to speak out, she says. Due to medical privacy laws, neither Kalamas nor her attorney, Dan Horowitz, could provide details about the child and the procedure.

“The case should have been referred to a qualified medical center, which Dr. Kalamas strongly encouraged her,” the lawsuit reads. “In particular, Dr. Kalamas told medical leadership that she had extensive experience with similar cases at UCSF and that JMH was massively underprepared.”

She said she told John Muir Health executives if they did the surgery it would be a “clean kill.”

After the child died, Kalamas requested a review of the case by the Medical Executive Committee, which could result in disciplinary action for those involved, disclosure to parents, and other safeguards. In a 2021 email shared with The Chronicle, Kalamas was informed that the case never went to the committee.

She recalled her earlier concerns about the surgery in an email, explaining how liver transplant and anesthesia experts agreed with her reservations.

“I was angry that JMH misrepresented the capabilities of their clinicians and the institutions’ ability to provide parents (redacted) with safe care given that UCSF, Stanford and Oakland Childrens’ are all much better equipped to to handle cases of this complexity,” she wrote. She added that she was told that John Muir health officials wanted their new pediatric center and needed to avoid disruption.

Horowitz said the child’s parents are still unaware of Kalamas’ concerns to this day.

In response to the pediatric death, Rodriguez said some cases had “extremely advanced life-threatening conditions for which any intervention is a high risk and not having an intervention is also a high risk.” He said all options were discussed with the family before the operation and since Kalamas is not part of the treatment team she would not know all the details.

He said a post-case review was conducted through the peer review process, but Kalamas would not be aware of any assessment as it is confidential.

As of May 31, 2021, Kalamas said her contract was allowed to expire. Since then she has not returned to a hospital.

Matthias Gafni is a contributor to the San Francisco Chronicle. E-mail: matthias.gafni@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @mgafni

Merkel push for German lockdown blocked as dying toll passes 100,000

BERLIN, GERMANY – SEPTEMBER 22: German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) speaks with Vice Chancellor and Federal Finance Minister Olaf Scholz.

Swimming pool | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Germany’s Covid-19 crisis continues to rock the nation with dire news on Thursday that the total number of deaths has now surpassed 100,000.

However, the country’s new coalition government is initially resisting a lockdown.

Germany reported massive new Covid cases on Thursday. with over 75,000 new infections in the last 24 hours (and up from 66,884 on Wednesday), while the death toll has now reached 100,119 after 351 more people died from the virus the previous day.

Government officials have been watching the rising cases with alarm for weeks, and the country’s outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel is said to have pushed for a two-week lockdown at a meeting on Tuesday with the country’s new coalition government.

According to the Bild newspaper, the new government alliance of the left-wing Social Democrats and Greens as well as the business-friendly Free Democrats resisted the idea and preferred to wait to see whether the stricter Covid restrictions announced last week would help reduce infections.

While Merkel had proposed a lockdown starting Thursday that would have closed shops, bars and restaurants, the idea was rejected by the new government, which said it had been interpreted as a “bad political ploy” by the public, both old and new government, Picture reported Wednesday.

CNBC contacted the federal government for further comments on the picture report and learned that “the German government does not comment on the media coverage.

“However, the government referred to statements made by Merkel’s chief spokesman Steffen Seibert on Wednesday, in which he neither denied nor confirmed whether Merkel had pushed for a lockdown, and stated that the conversation between Merkel and the coalition leaders was confidential, but he said she” had discussed the gravity of the situation.

“At this meeting yesterday, the Chancellor made it clear to the heads of the traffic light coalition that, from her point of view, the situation is extremely serious. The drama is obvious in this country: the hospitals are filling rapidly. Free intensive care beds and available intensive care staff are becoming increasingly scarce, “said Seibert.

“Now we have to do what is necessary to slow down and break this fourth wave as quickly as possible. As I said, the Chancellor has made it clear to the heads of the future coalition that the situation is serious.”

Compulsory vaccination

(from left to right) Christian Lindner from the FDP, Olaf Scholz from the SPD and Annalene Baerbock and Robert Habeck from the Greens pose after they presented their amicable coalition agreement to the media on November 24, 2021 in Berlin, Germany.

Sean Gallup | Getty Images News | Getty Images

After the deal and the coalition’s political ambitions were announced on Wednesday, Scholz signaled that the Covid crisis was an immediate priority for the government. He started a press conference announcing the coalition agreement by saying the virus situation in Germany is serious and the country will expand its vaccination campaign, including mandating vaccines for some people.

“Vaccination is the way out of this pandemic. In facilities in which endangered groups of people are cared for, we should make vaccination compulsory,” said Scholz, without giving any details.

Meanwhile, the new finance minister Christian Lindner declared that the Germans should avoid any unnecessary contact this winter “in order to preserve our whole health in this pandemic”.

Germany already tightened the Covid rules during the last fourth wave of cases in the country.

Many federal states in Germany have already restricted access to public spaces such as bars, restaurants, cinemas and museums according to “2G rules” and restricted access only to those who have been vaccinated – “vaccinated” in German – or recovered, “recovered” . Some large German Christmas markets that were not canceled this year have also adopted 2G rules.

On Wednesday, new measures came into effect imposing “3G” rules on public transport and anyone entering a workplace, which means that more public spaces are open to vaccinated, recent genesis or people with a negative test (“tested”) .

If Germany decides to be vaccinated in some settings, it will not be the first. The UK, France and Italy are among the countries that have introduced (or are introducing) compulsory vaccination for some sectors such as healthcare or homeworkers.

Still, compulsory vaccinations are a sensitive issue and have many ethical issues, and Germany, like other countries, could face a backlash against the switch.

Continue reading: Are Covid Vaccine Regulations Ethical? That’s what doctors say

Germany has tried to encourage the voluntary uptake of Covid vaccination in its population, but at 68.1% of the population it has one of the lower Covid vaccination rates in Western Europe.

Vaccine hesitation, the upcoming winter season, and the spread of the highly infectious Delta-Covid variant, which is far more virulent than previous strains, are making it difficult to contain the virus this time around for Germany, a country widely praised for its initial handling of the pandemic .

Pfizer says its Covid tablet with HIV drug cuts the chance of hospitalization or dying by 89%

Pfizer said Friday that its easy-to-use Covid-19 pill, used in combination with a widely used HIV drug, increased the risk of hospitalization or death in high-risk adults exposed to the virus by 89% lowers.

It’s now the second antiviral pill behind it Merck‘s to demonstrate strong efficacy in treating Covid at the first sign of disease. If approved by regulators, it would likely mark a turning point in the ongoing global battle against the pandemic.

Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla told CNBC the company plans to submit its data to the Food and Drug Administration before Thanksgiving.

“I think this drug is going to change the way things are happening, that are going to save millions and millions of lives, it has the potential to do that,” Bourla said in an interview with CNBC.Squawk box“He said the company has” the current capacity of 500 million pills, “which in his opinion equates to 50 million treatments.” The very high level of effectiveness comes as a surprise even to us and exceeds our most visionary expectations about it. “

Pfizer’s pill, scientifically known as PF-07321332, belongs to a class of drugs called protease inhibitors and works by blocking an enzyme that the virus needs to multiply in human cells. Protease inhibitors are used to treat other viral pathogens such as HIV and hepatitis C.

The HIV drug helps slow the metabolism or breakdown of the Pfizer pill so that it stays active in the body for longer periods of time at higher concentrations, the company said.

The company said its data on the drug is based on a mid-to late-stage study of 1,219 adults who had at least one underlying disease and one laboratory-confirmed infection within five days. Participants also received a low dose of ritonavir, a drug often used in combination treatments for HIV.

Pfizer said there were six hospitalizations and zero deaths of the 607 study participants who received the pill in combination with the HIV drug within five days of the onset of symptoms. That compares to 41 hospitalizations and 10 deaths for the 612 people who received a placebo.

“These data suggest that our oral antiviral candidate, if approved by regulators, has the potential to save patients’ lives, reduce the severity of COVID-19 infections and achieve up to nine out of ten hospital stays Avoid, “said Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer in a statement.

not how Gilead SciencesThe intravenous drug Remdesivir, Pfizer and Merck drugs can be taken orally. While vaccinations remain the best form of protection against the virus, health experts hope pills like these will prevent the progression of the disease in those who become infected and prevent hospitalizations.

Biotherapeutics from Merck and Ridgeback said on October 1st that they developed a drug that, when given on its own, reduces the risk of hospitalization or death in patients with mild or moderate cases of Covid by about 50%.

Merck’s antiviral pill was approved by The UK Medicines Agency on Thursday.

June Raine, chief executive of the UK’s drug and health products regulator, said the Merck pill is the treatment of Covid, a disease that has cost the lives of more than 5 million people worldwide and has put an enormous strain on health systems.

Bourla told CNBC in April that Pfizer’s pill could be available to Americans by the end of this year.

Spokane household spends weeks elevating cash for father’s funeral following COVID demise

September 26, 2021 7:03 p.m.

Posted on September 26, 2021 7:03 PM

SPOKANE, Wash. – A Spokane family has been trying to raise funds to pay for the funeral of their veteran father, who died of COVID-19, for weeks.

Rachel Foye and her family and friends have been standing in the Staples parking lot in St. Division with signs trying to raise some money since early September.

Foye’s father, a Vietnam veteran, died of COVID in early September. She said her father was vaccinated but still had complications with COVID. Since then, the family has been trying to raise money for funeral expenses.

Foye said it costs more than $ 8,000 for funeral services alone. Since raising funds, they have raised approximately $ 5,000 in addition to a donation from Veteran Affairs.

She says it is financially difficult, especially since she also has eight children who live at home.

“It’s hard. It’s really hard because you want to be home to grieve with your kids and go through those emotions,” said Foye. “It’s a lot of money when you don’t have money.”

Sunday was the last day for the fundraiser as they have to pay the funeral home on Monday.

TIED TOGETHER: Washington State Trooper dies of COVID

TIED TOGETHER: “I know he wouldn’t survive”: Woman fears for her father’s life as COVID spreads in the Spokane Veterans Home

50 years after his dying, followers honor Jim Morrison in Paris | Leisure

She has since moved to Paris and comes to Pere-Lachaise almost every year to photograph Morrison’s grave and his fans, many of whom have become friends.

“(It’s like) people sitting around on couches in someone’s apartment instead of in a grave just talking and meeting,” she recalls. “It was really nice … I still come as often as I can because it’s always so wonderful.”

Colleen Amblard drove seven hours from her hometown of Domancy in the French Alps to visit the tomb. The 21-year-old student told The Associated Press, “It is very emotional to be here, to remember Jim Morrison … to show that he has not been forgotten.”

“We recognize his talent and the fact that he was a brilliant person, he really was a genius,” she said.

Like many other fans, Amblard planned to visit other places Morrison spent time during his stay in Paris, from his apartment to the former nightclub where some say he died of a heroin overdose.

Born in Melbourne, Florida in 1943, Morrison was the son of a US Navy officer and moved constantly as a child, growing up in Florida, Virginia, Texas, New Mexico, and California.

He said he witnessed the aftermath of a terrible car accident on a Native American reservation as a child, an event that featured prominently in his later texts and poems. As an avid reader, he was heavily influenced by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, the poet Arthur Rimbaud and the surrealist playwright Antonin Artaud.

How ought to I make investments my son’s cash from his dad’s loss of life?

Q. My son receives social assistance after his father dies. The money just sits in a savings account and does nothing. I’ve already opened two 529s for him. One is from family and friends after death and another is straight from my paycheck. I paid $ 500 straight to my check transfer once a month for incidentals. There is currently about $ 16,000 in savings. I’ve transferred large amounts to the 529 in the past, but I don’t want to invest any more money there. I want to set up something for long-term growth that he cannot touch until he has found his own path on the path he has chosen. We have no money problems. What do you suggest? I know zero about money and investing.

– parent

A. We are sorry to hear of your son’s father’s death.

But it is good to know that you are taking a proactive approach to your son’s financial well-being.

There are many things to consider before making any decisions, said Peter McKenna, a certified financial planner with Modera Wealth Management in Westwood.

You need to take into account the age of your son, when the social security payments end, how much you are in the 529 plans What do you expect college to cost and whether or not to be eligible for on-demand grant, McKenna said.

But here are some starting points.

Her son is not yet an adult so he cannot open an “own” investment account, McKenna said. Instead, you can a. to open Custody account Make decisions for him as his “administrator” until he comes of age, at which point he becomes the legal owner and decision maker of the account, he said.

However, this may not be ideal for a number of reasons.

“It is rare for someone this age to have the maturity and experience to make informed financial decisions. Most of us, myself included, can look back on a few decisions we made when we were 18 that, in hindsight, were shockingly bad, ”said McKenna. “Having an account in your son’s name could affect everyone too needs-based financial help he could be entitled to it in the future. “

You could consider opening an investment account on your behalf and when you’re confident he can take responsibility, you can gift him the property, McKenna said.

“I think low-cost brokerage firms like Vanguard and Schwab would be good options for both types of accounts,” he said.

Once the account is opened, you need to decide how you want to invest the money.

“There is a correlation between the return you expect and the risk you must take to get that return,” McKenna said. “The amount of risk you take depends on when the funds may be needed and how the account maker, you and ultimately your son, react to a poor market environment.”

With a time horizon of five years or less, very little risk should be taken and low returns expected, he said. If the funds are not needed for 10 years or more, more risk can be taken to try to increase the main balance.

But remember: Markets can and do drop steeply at certain points.

“It is critical that we prepare for these inevitable market events and only take as much risk as we are willing to endure through those events,” he said.

Once you’ve identified the amount of risk you want to take, according to McKenna, there are a number of good, inexpensive ones out there Exchange Traded Funds (ETF) that you can shop commission-free to meet that target risk, he said.

“The manager of an ETF will control the level of risk at a relatively constant level so you don’t have to,” he said. “The commission-free feature is useful when you add money over time.”

This do-it-yourself (DIY) approach may not be for you because you said, “I don’t know about money and investing,” McKenna said.

If you want to take the DIY approach, you owe it to your son and yourself to study personal finance better, McKenna said.

He recommends reading “I Will Teach You To Be Rich,” Ramit Sethi’s 2nd Edition.

Another option is to opt to work with a financial advisor who can help you develop a more comprehensive approach to your family’s finances. McKenna offered this link from the National Association of Personal Financial Advisors for some tips on how to search.

Send your questions by email to Ask@NJMoneyHelp.com.

Karin Price Müller writes the Bamboo led Column for NJ Advance Media and is the founder of NJMoneyHelp.com. Follow NJMoneyHelp on Twitter @NJMoneyHelp. Find NJMoneyHelp on Facebook. Sign up for NJMoneyHelp.com‘s weekly e-newsletter.

John McAfee’s Ominous Suicide Tweets Stir Epstein-Type Conspiracies After Dying in Jail

The death of computer entrepreneur John McAfee in a Spanish prison, reported as suicide by local media, enraged American conspiracy theorists when they picked up 9-month-old tweets saying he feared for his life.

McAfee, a British American wanted for tax evasion in the United States, has long been a controversial figure: he is credited with creating the billion dollar antivirus software industry, accused of manipulating the cryptocurrency markets, and wanted by police investigating a murder in Belize .

In Spain, the Catalan Justice Ministry said prison doctors did not resuscitate McAfee and that everything points to suicide, the BBC reports, based on an earlier report in the Spanish newspaper El Pais. A Spanish judge had previously approved a US extradition request so that he could be charged with tax evasion.

The Catalan statement did nothing to quell speculation on the American internet, given McAfee’s tweets fearful that he would suffer the same fate as Jeffrey Epstein, the convicted pedophile who died of suicide in a New York prison in 2019.

McAfee’s tweet on October 15, 2020 while in a Barcelona prison read: “I’m happy in here. I have friends. The food is good. All is well. You know that if I hang myself, a la Epstein, it won’t be my fault. “

I am satisfied here. I have friends.

The food is good. All is well.

Know if I hang myself like Epstein, it’s not my fault.

– John McAfee (@officialmcafee) October 15, 2020

Epstein’s death has been the focus of wild speculation by QAnon conspirators who claim He was murdered to protect his powerful friends and allies. QAnon supporters believe America is ruled by an elite group of Satan’s worshiping pedophiles.

Another McAfee tweet dated November 30, 2019 read: “I get subtle messages from US officials who end up saying, ‘We’re coming for you McAfee! We will kill you ‘. I got a tattoo today just in case. If I killed myself, I didn’t. I was beaten up. Check out my right arm. “

About an hour after his death was announced, McAfee officials said Instagram posted a picture of a bold letter “Q”

Twitter user @_legrek shared a collage of McAfee’s social media posts and shared the hashtag “#johnmcafeedidntkillhimself” in a second tweet.

McAfee was arrested in Spain on October 6, 2020 on allegations of tax evasion. He was found dead shortly after a Spanish Supreme Court approved his extradition to the United States. He could have appealed the extradition decision. The final decision would have required the approval of the Spanish cabinet.

Prosecutors said McAfee evaded taxes on undisclosed income from 2014 to 2018. The income allegedly came from lectures, the promotion of cryptocurrencies, while he advised and sold the rights to his life story. One indictment alleged that he hid land, vehicles, a yacht and other assets by registering them in other people’s names. If convicted, he faces up to 30 years imprisonment.

In an October 2020 tweet, antivirus software creator John McAfee wrote, “You know it’s not my fault if I hang myself, a la Epstein. In this photo, McAfee is speaking to journalists at the China Internet Security Conference in Beijing on August 16, 2016.
Fred Dufour / AFP / Getty

In a virtual court hearing in June, McAfee said the charges against him were politically motivated. He believed he would spend the rest of his life in prison if the Spanish authorities extradited him to the United States.

In January 2019, McAfee posted a video claiming he evaded U.S. judicial authorities by living on a boat in international waters.

“I haven’t paid taxes for eight years. I have not submitted any statements. Every year I tell the IRS, ‘I am not filing a statement, I have no intention of doing this, come and find me,’ ”he said in a Twitter Video.

In a tweet on January 3, 2019, he wrote: “I haven’t filed a tax return for 8 years. Why? 1: Taxation is illegal. 2: I’ve already paid tens of millions and received Jack S *** in the form of services. 3. I’m done making money. I live on McAfee Inc. money. My net income is negative. But I am a primary target for the IRS. Here I am.”

In March, New York South District Attorneys charged McAfee with conspiracy to commit fraud and money laundering.

The charges alleged that McAfee and his bodyguard Jimmy Gale Watson Jr. bought cryptocurrency assets before promoting them to McAfee’s over millions of Twitter followers. The couple reportedly sold the assets after McAfee’s tweets rose in value.


John McAfee, shown speaking to reporters in 2012 after being deported from Guatemala to the United States, likely died of suicide on Wednesday. His death was the subject of conspiracy theories mirroring those that circled Jeffrey Epstein following the account of his death.
PAULA BUSTAMANTE / AFP / Getty

The charges further alleged that cryptocurrency startups paid the duo over $ 11 million to promote their assets on Twitter. These payments were never communicated to McAfee Twitter followers or buyers of the cryptocurrency, the US Department of Justice said.

In November 2012, McAfee went into hiding after police in the Central American country of Belize sought him out as a “person of interest” in the murder of the American Gregory Faull. Faull and McAfee were both living on the coastal island of Ambergris Caye when Faull was found dead in a pool of blood.

McAfee denied killing Faull. Belize Prime Minister Dean Barrow called McAfee “paranoid” and publicly urged him to cooperate with the police.

“I don’t mean to be rude, but he seems extremely paranoid, I would go as far as to say nonsense,” said Barrow.

The Belizean police arrested McAfee in early 2012 for alleged possession of weapons and drugs. The police later released him without charge.

Newsweek contacted the Justice Department for comment.

Update (June 23rd, 2021, 8:50 pm): This article has been updated to include additional information on McAfee’s past with cryptocurrency and the Belize incident.

Household of Chris Cornell settles with physician over his demise | Ap-entertainment

LOS ANGELES (AP) – Chris Cornell’s family and a doctor they alleged prescribed medication before he died have agreed to settle a lawsuit.

Court documents filed by attorneys for the rock singer’s widow, Vicky Cornell, and her children, Toni and Christopher Nicholas Cornell, stated that a confidential settlement had been reached. The documents were filed in April but went unnoticed before the City News Service reported on Thursday.

The Cornell family alleged in their 2018 lawsuit filed with the Los Angeles Supreme Court that drugs, particularly that of Dr. Robert Koblin prescribed the anti-anxiety drug Lorazepam, which would have caused erratic behavior from the Soundgarden frontman prior to his death in Detroit in 2017 at age 52.

Coroner’s Michigan investigators ruled that Cornell’s death by hanging was suicide. Tests showed the presence of lorazepam, better known under the brand name Ativan, in Cornell’s system along with barbiturates and the anti-opioid drug naloxone, but did not name them as a factor in his death.

The lawsuit alleged that Koblin and his Beverly Hills, California office had “negligently and repeatedly” prescribed “dangerous mind-altering controlled substances” to Chris Cornell that impaired Mr. Cornell’s cognition, impaired judgment, and induced him to do so to engage in dangerous impulsive behaviors that he could not control and cost him his life. “

The lawsuit said the doctor did so because he knew Cornell had a serious history of substance abuse.

In court documents responding to the lawsuit, Koblin and his attorney denied any wrongdoing or responsibility for Cornell’s death.

Emails with comments sent to lawyers on both sides Thursday night were not immediately returned.

“After years of litigation and settlement negotiations, the plaintiffs and defendants … entered into a confidential settlement agreement to resolve all claims,” ​​the Cornell family lawyers said on the April 2 file.

The key document for the compromise was the agreement to minimize publicity and keep the terms confidential.

The case has received “significant media coverage and attention from fans of Mr. Cornell and allies of the plaintiffs,” the court record said. “Unfortunately, as in many celebrity cases, this action has drawn the attention of those who have molested plaintiffs, including threats to the life and safety of plaintiffs Toni Cornell and Christopher Nicholas Cornell.”

A judge has yet to approve the parts of the settlement that involve the children, who are both minors, and the documents state that if it doesn’t, the lawsuit will go to court.

Cornell’s plaintive voice and his long-haired, shirtless stage presence made him an indispensable figure in grunge rock of the 1990s. Soundgarden was among the first groups to gain national attention in a wave that later became Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains.

Follow AP Entertainment Writer Andrew Dalton on Twitter: https://twitter.com/andyjamesdalton

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed in any way without permission.

Olivia Newton-John mourning ‘sudden demise’ of her most cancers nurse | Leisure

Olivia Newton-John paid tribute to her late cancer nurse and hailed her as an “energetic and powerful woman”.

The 72-year-old actress mourns Emma Cohen – a nurse at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness & Research Center – after she sadly passed away earlier this month, and revealed the impact she had during her battle with the disease.

She wrote on Instagram: “My heart is still in shock and so sad about the sudden loss of the very special Emma Cohen.

“Emma looked after me at a very vulnerable time in my life when I was a patient in her department at @onjcancercentre in 2018.

“She made sure my stay was safe and comfortable, always had practical advice for me, showed strong leadership skills and had a great sense of humor.

“She was a bright, energetic, and powerful woman with a bright future ahead of her, and we have agreed on our mission to help patients on their cancer journey.”

Olivia was diagnosed with stage four metastatic breast cancer in 2017 – her third battle with the disease.

The “fat” star – who did not reveal a cause of death – admitted she “will miss seeing” [Emma’s] beautiful face “in the middle.

She continued, “Emma had such a generous mind and warm and loving heart – I will miss seeing her beautiful face in the center and sending my love and deepest condolences to her friends and family.”

The Cancer Nurses Society of Australia, of which Emma was a board member, announced that she died on April 9th ​​after a “brief illness”.

They wrote on Facebook, “Emma was a vibrant and passionate leader and a bitter and intelligent advocate for the cancer care workforce and their patients. Her loss has left a great void in our communities and in our hearts.”

Meanwhile, Olivia recently shared her battle with cancer and revealed how “having a positive attitude” has helped her get through every day.

She said, “I’m really fine.

“I think it’s just about keeping a positive attitude and believing that I’ll be fine. And talk to my body and do everything possible to support me emotionally and mentally. “

BBC protection of Philip’s dying attracts report complaints | Leisure

LONDON (AP) – The BBC’s coverage of the death of Prince Philip has generated nearly 110,000 public complaints, making it the UK’s most objectionable television program

The station released its regular shows on two television channels on Friday to launch a series of special programs after Queen Elizabeth II’s husband passed away at the age of 99. Popular shows like “EastEnders” and the cooking contest show “Masterchef” have been postponed and replaced with news broadcasts and recorded honors, and the BBC Four channel has been completely taken off the air.

BBC radio stations also broadcast programs on Philip.

The BBC said in a statement Thursday that Philip’s death was a “significant event that attracted great interest both nationally and internationally,” but acknowledged that some felt the rolling coverage was excessive.

“We acknowledge that some viewers have been unhappy with the level of coverage and the impact this has had on the television and radio programming that is billed,” she continued. “We don’t make such changes without careful consideration and the choices we make reflect the role the BBC plays as a national broadcaster in moments of national importance.”

The company also received complaints about its decision to include Prince Andrew in its tribute coverage despite his association with U.S. sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. It said it had “handled his comments appropriately”, reported in detail on the allegations against Andrew and made it clear that he had not been charged with any criminal offense.