Ree Drummond Shares Her Trend Fashion and the Clothes That Makes It the ‘Finest Day of My Life’

Ree Drummondis new Walmart clothing line perfectly represents the style of the Pioneer Woman star. In an interview with People, Drummond shared her penchant for fluid feminine fashion and revealed the types of clothing that bring her happiness and make her “the best day of my life”.

Ree Drummond | Monica Schipper / Getty Images for The Pioneer Woman Magazine

Ree Drummond’s Walmart clothing reflects her love for feminine styling

In an interview with persons, Drummond talked about her Fall collection from Walmart and what inspired the clothing line that includes jeans, leggings, sweaters, tops, dresses and athleisure pieces.

The Pioneer Woman star shared that, though she has lost weight, she still relies on her signature flowing tops. “I’ve found that I love the same clothes. My size may be a little smaller, but I still love them [loose] Silhouettes, ”said Drummond. “A little frill here and there. Empire waist. I still like the loose fit with enough small details that it doesn’t look like I’m wearing curtains.

She added, “It’s still very flattering. I still love the same style. “

She said well-fitting clothing is a game changer

Drummond’s fashion leanings are unmistakable, with lots of floral patterns in the mix. She explained, “Everyone who knows me knows that I have a certain look that is feminine and floral and not as fit because I have four children.”

Drummond also admitted that she doesn’t have a “favorite shop or designer,” and she thinks so Discover clothes that fit is the most important thing to her.

“If it suits me, I love it. It doesn’t matter where it comes from, what it’s made of, ”she explained. “If I find a top that I like or a sweater that fits, it’s simply the best day of my life.”

During their live event for Walmart, a fan asked Drummond what her favorite design was, and she shared how her collection portrayed her “favorite shapes”.

“They look at my favorite shapes and that was one of the reasons I wanted to start The Pioneer Woman clothing line,” she replied. “Because I’m always looking for the perfect top that fits me well. I don’t care where it is or what I have to do to get it – if it suits me, I’m happy. ”

Commented Drummond, “And so I wanted to be able to bring all the tops I had in my head to life so you could check out some of my favorite designs.”

‘The Pioneer Woman’ star shared her favorite pieces from the Walmart collection

Drummond is a fan of everything in their fall Walmart collection, but shared their enthusiasm for the sweaters in an October interview Life in the south Magazine.

“For the first time we now have sweaters. I will live in them, ”she explained. You are my favorites. I love sweaters when they’re flattering. Sometimes they can be big and bulky, but they are not. “

Drummond continued, “My favorite is the black and teal floral print with a waterfall neckline. It’s all I love about sweater-shaped clothes. Small bell sleeves, large bluebells, a waterfall neckline … well, I grew up in the 70s. ”

She also shared her love for the solid V-neck sweater in her collection, stating, “The shape is so cute.”

TIED TOGETHER: ‘The Pioneer Woman’: Ree Drummond shared her simple weight loss tips

The Avenue Type Crowd Went Preppy on Day 2 of London Trend Week

On the street at London Fashion Week Spring 2022.

Neat style made a prominent appearance on the second day of London Fashion Week, with showgoers dressed in everything from college sweater vests to polo shirts to pleated skirts and loafers.

We discovered evidence of upper class leisure activities (tennis skirts are on strike again) and school uniforms in preparation for college. While this poppy collar look isn’t new to the fashion scene, it is Street style Prep Spread in London was a little more playful than we’ve ever seen: a guest dressed a crisp, white, pleated mini for off-court engagements by pairing it with edgy mules; another didn’t tuck her oversized striped shirt into her khaki pleated skirt or button the shirt all the way, which made for a refreshingly cool look that broke the dress code.

Those who didn’t go back to school had a great time in neon green and bold floral prints. There were also a handful of guests showing off their top notch layering skills, wearing skirts over pants like it wasn’t a big deal.

Browse through our favorites Street style looks from the second day London Fashion Week in the gallery below.

In case you missed it, check out our favorite street style looks from day one from London Fashion Week under.

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Macy’s says public can return to look at Thanksgiving Day parade in NYC

The Charlie Brown balloon floats on 6th Avenue during the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City.

Stephanie Keith | Getty Images

Macys said Wednesday that the public will again be able to line the streets of New York City to see their annual Thanksgiving Day Parade live.

This year’s event will mark the 95th edition of Macy’s iconic balloon parade. Live musical performances will also resume, including the marching bands originally expected for last year’s parade.

The event was drastically reduced in the past year due to the Covid pandemic. It did not use the usual 2.5 mile parade route and just switched to a TV show instead.

“We are very excited to see the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in its full form again,” said the Mayor of New York City Bill de Blasio said in a statement. “We applaud Macy’s work in creatively continuing this beloved tradition over the past year.”

Macy’s said it adopted best practices from its recent July 4th fireworks show, which this year attracted a public audience after being reduced in 2020.

For its Thanksgiving Day Parade, Macy’s said that all volunteer participants and staff must be vaccinated against Covid-19. To implement social distancing along the parade route, Macy’s will reduce attendance by up to 20%, or around 800 to 1,600 attendees.

The department store chain also said it is still considering how to deal with the balloon inflation public viewing that takes place the night before the parade.

Macy’s added that it continues to monitor evolving health trends and stands ready to implement contingency plans if necessary.

Find the full Macy’s press release here here.

Disclosure: Comcasts NBCUniversal is the parent company of CNBC and CNBC.com. NBC has televised the event since 1953.

CA’s Finest Labor Day Weekend Barbecue Ideas, Carolina Model

CALIFORNIA – The Golden State may be the top outdoor grilling destination this Labor Day weekend, but the state has nothing to offer like authentic Southern barbecue.

With vacation coming up, we reached out to someone with real barbecue chops for tips on how to sizzle a California backyard feast.

Rodney Scott is a legendary pitmaster in the southeast. He has been cooking whole pig barbecue over charcoal since he was 11 and learned his trade from his family at Scott’s Variety Store & Bar-BQ in Hemingway, SC

Scott is now a middle-aged married man with three sons three restaurants in the southeast which are a must for barbecue lovers.

He opened his first Rodney Scott’s BBQ on King Street in Charleston, SC., partnered with The Pihakis Restaurant Group in 2017, and it’s been a delicious ride ever since. In the same year, Bon Appétit named it one of the 50 best new restaurants; In 2018, Scott was named Best Chef: Southeast at the James Beard Foundation Awards.

Last September, the grill master starred in his own episode on the Netflix series “Chef’s Table”; this year he is a judge on the Food Network’s “BBQ Brawl: Flay vs. Symon”; and in March he published his first cookbook, “Rodney Scott’s Grill World: Every day is a good day“(Clarkson Potter; March 16, 2021).

The book is a compendium of special recipes and poignant essays on South Carolina food and traditions. It’s also an American success story that describes how a young pit master went from working for his father in the tobacco fields and smokehouse to making the sacrifices he made to expand his family’s business and then set up his own business in Charleston .

Scott’s BBQ restaurants serve ribs, chicken, and turkey on the menu, with classic side dishes like kale, coleslaw, and “Ella’s Banana Pudding,” a tribute to Scott’s mother. His barbecue style is “Carolina,” which is whole pork cooking.

“The whole pig is a difference that can be tasted, and the fact that we make it here is what sets us apart,” said Scott.

But the grill king is an easy man when it comes to gardening at home.

“My first port of call would be the hamburger or hot dog, then ribs,” he told Patch. “If I feel like it, it’s probably the ribeye steak and anything cooked over the fire.

“Believe it or not, my favorite weekends are pasta salad, chicken salad, or seafood salad, which is served cold with ribs,” he continued. “My next stop would be a hamburger and a hot dog in that order, both on the plate at the same time.”

But when planning a feast, “the first step is choosing your favorite protein,” said Scott. “Mine is steak, more precisely a ribeye cut with a bone. For fish I prefer fillet catfish or salmon, and for poultry I choose chicken legs because they are juicier and you get a nice crispy skin when cooked over a stone. Go with proteins that contain some fat for more flavor. “

Scott is a master at pit barbecue, which involves cooking in a hole in the ground. This method has evolved into above-ground pits, usually built with cinder blocks, with a grill about 2 feet above the fire.

“This method is the best because it comes slowly and slowly so that the food can really absorb that smoky taste,” explained Scott.

But many Californians use store-bought grills, and low and slow isn’t exactly a forte in the West.

“For people who don’t have the patience and want to grill quickly, I’d suggest a smaller protein like hamburgers, hot dogs, weenies, shrimp kebabs, and wings. They cook a lot faster and are super easy to add flavor, “explained Scott.

When it comes to seasoning, Scott recommends trying the flavors you choose before actually using them. Sometimes you need a rub, but sometimes a sprinkle is enough. Leave it to your taste buds.

“I always tell people to try the rub before you apply it so you can see if it’s too salty or too sweet, which helps you know how much to sprinkle or grate,” explained Scott . “If you want to tenderize your meat, be sure to marinate the protein at refrigerator temperature – that is, put it back in the refrigerator as long as possible before cooking it.”

For Seiten, Scott suggests picking what’s in season.

“Enjoy the last of the summer corn with some kale and maybe a grilled vegetable salad,” he said.

The biggest mistake Scott sees cooking over a fire is not being careful.

“A lot of people turn away from cooking and get distracted and burn the food. Focus on the food and it will be great,” he said.

According to Scott, the real secret to a good grill isn’t that complicated.

“Be prepared to have fun and enjoy your barbecue,” he said. “Enjoy the moment with family, friends and neighbors and serve it with confidence.”

Individuals are wanting to hit the street Labor Day vacation weekend

Large areas such as national parks and beaches are still popular for long vacation weekends.

Thomas Barwick | Stone | Getty Images

A spike in Covid-19 infections due to the Delta variant may slow recovery from the pandemic, but Labor Day travelers looking for a hurray last summer – and with the shadow of possible future bans on their mind – are eager to to be on the way.

Recent studies have shown that this is happening despite ongoing concerns about Covid-19 and related restrictions like mask and vaccination requirements for travel destinations and venues.

Up to that point, 75% of people surveyed by travel website The Vacationer and SurveyMonkey on August 1 said the coronavirus remains a “minor” or “major” problem, according to co-founder Eric Jones. However, Jones said he thinks Labor Day travel is on the rise “because people want to make sure they get something”.

“There is talk of new quarantine rules or bans … so some fear they will not be able to travel again,” added Jones, finding in an earlier poll this summer.

The Vacationer found that 25% of Americans are planning so-called revenge trips. “That means they travel more than usual just because they were bottled at home,” Jones said. “Well, I suspect this is one of the last Labor Day opportunities you have this summer.”

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In fact, The Vacationer’s latest survey found that more than 53% of 571 respondents are planning a work holiday trip, with 4.03% using public transit, 12.08% flying, and 36.95% driving a car. The result – extrapolated to the US population as a whole – would mean that 137 million American adults will travel that weekend, according to the website, an increase from July 4th and more than 10% more than the total number of weekends on Easter and on Memorial Day together.

For its part, Tripadvisor found that only 31% of Americans surveyed plan to travel this weekend, which is in line with 2020 (32%) and even 2019 (35%) levels.

Elizabeth Monahan, senior communications manager and US travel expert on site, said that “this is pretty consistent when it comes to a long weekend.” Tripadvisor found that 86% of travelers will stay in the US, with 45% traveling locally by car or train and 41% using domestic flights. Only 14% plan to travel abroad.

Among the age cohorts, Millennials are the most willing to travel with 38%, followed by Generation X with 32% and Generation Z with 31%. Older Americans are far less inclined to travel this week, with only 13% of baby boomers traveling.

Millennials, who are often thought to be in their 30s and 40s now, are more likely to be parents of children who went to school at home in the last year – perhaps Monahan explains the population’s eagerness to leave the home.

“This group in particular really missed some of the great memories that travel and experience different parts of the world with those who are closest to you can make,” she said.

It’s not just surveys that show an increasing interest in Labor Day travel, but also in hard sales data. TripIt, from Concur’s data analysis, showed domestic flight, car rentals, accommodations and vacation rentals bookings were 53%, 75%, 62% and 46% respectively, compared to Labor Day 2019 only 33% of 2019 levels; Bookings from car rental companies and accommodation have also increased significantly since the end of May.

Jen Moyse, TripIt’s senior director of product, said the analytical results were not a “big surprise”.

“What we’ve seen in our previous studies is that people are more comfortable traveling and that is reflected in the bookings,” she said. “As soon as the vaccines came out, we saw the level of comfort increase.”

In terms of spending, 39.4% of respondents said they wouldn’t spend cash on travel this weekend, The Vacationer found. But of those who take a trip, the majority of travelers are spending less than $ 500 at 37.13%, while 12.08% will spend $ 501 to $ 1,000, according to The Vacationer’s survey. Meanwhile, about 11.38% will spend $ 1,001 or more. That means almost one in four adults will be spending more than $ 500 this weekend.

TripIt found that travelers stay longer, with accommodation reservations increasing by a factor of 10 since 2019 for both 8-13 day trips and trips longer than 14 days. Moyse also attributes this to business travelers who just want to stay away longer when they decide to travel. “When I get out, I’ll travel as I mean,” she said.

The more flexibility the various hospitality sectors can offer guests, the more businesses these providers will win.

Elizabeth Monahan

Senior Communications Manager at Tripadvisor

According to Tripadvisor, flexibility remains important for travelers; Filters like Free Cancellation, Pay at Stay, and Travel Safe are some of the most clicked filters on the page.

“The biggest benefit people are looking for is cleanliness, but flexibility is also a priority right now,” said Monahan. “The more flexibility the various hospitality sectors can offer guests, the more business these providers will win.”

Later that year they also booked weekend Labor Day flights, with TripIt seeing 51% of reservations in July, compared to just 18% in 2020. Tripadvisor has also seen a trend towards last minute bookings. The website found that 70% of trips booked in the first week of August were for trips within three weeks.

TripIt’s Moyse attributed this behavior to people knowing that conditions change day by day.

“Some of this has to do with looking at the current conditions and thinking, ‘Am I ready to go? What will it be like in this destination?'” Moyse said, citing Hawaii, which eased entry restrictions in July just got to tighten them again.

No escape from Covid

EMS FORSTER PRODUCTIONS | DigitalVision | Getty Images

Three in four of The Vacationer’s respondents said Covid-19 was a “slight” or “big” problem for Labor Day. Almost half fear that they (46.06%) or a family member or friend (46.76%) could get Covid, and 37.83% fear that they could unwittingly spread it. Mask (28.55%) and test or vaccine requirements (20.32%) were also of concern, regardless of whether respondents were for or against such mandates. Only 16.99% had no concerns at all.

Moyse at TripIt said, “There’s still some nervousness there [and] they are still cautious. “

However, this may be due to the surprising rise of the delta variant. “Once the Delta variant has been with us for a while, it’s possible we will see other responses from people,” she added.

“But right now, people are learning how to mask, they’re learning to take precautions, they’re learning to plan ahead, and that’s some of the advice we’ve given a lot,” added Moyse. “Think about how you can plan your trip a little differently than in 2019.”

Top 15 Labor Day Destinations on Tripadvisor for 2021

  1. Ocean City, Maryland
  2. Orlando Florida
  3. Las Vegas
  4. Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  5. new York
  6. Cancun, Mexico
  7. Virginia Beach, Virginia
  8. Miami Beach, Florida
  9. Key West, Florida
  10. Honolulu
  11. Panama City Beach, Florida
  12. Atlantic City, New Jersey
  13. Gatlinburg, Tennessee
  14. Chicago
  15. Pigeon Forge, Tennessee

Source: Tripadvisor

In fact, Tripadvisor found that beaches and national parks – mostly outdoor areas that became popular amid pandemic lockdowns last year – remain the most sought-after attractions in August.

“When people want to get out and travel, they want to be sure to do so in places like the outdoors or on beaches or while hiking – we’re even seeing a lot of interest in camping,” Monahan said. “Places where you can enjoy beautiful views but also practice social distancing have remained a really strong trend, and we’re now seeing that for Labor Day weekend as well.”

The trend is reflected in how Tripadvisor’s top Labor Day travel destinations compare to those in 2019, when more urban spots were popular. This year, Ocean City, Maryland ranked first, pushing former No. 1 destination Las Vegas to third, and 10 of the top 15 travel destinations are warm weather or seaside destinations. Two years ago, on the other hand, 10 out of 15 top positions were large cities.

That said, don’t expect the city to stay out forever.

“We’re seeing some places like New York and even Chicago popping up again,” Monahan said.

The Big Apple, # 2 in 2019, held its fifth place this year, and the Windy City, once the sixth most popular, retains some attraction at 14th place.

Dillan Gibbons helps increase cash to carry his shut pal to Tallahassee for Sport Day

TALLAHASSEE, Florida (WCTV) – Reunited and it feels so good. A story about a FSU soccer graduate transfer helps a close friend now that Mission Timmy to Tally was accomplished has been a success.

Dillan Gibson uses his NIL deal with a GoFundMe to raise money to take Timothy to Sunday’s Notre Dame game.

“There aren’t really words that can justify my feelings, but I’m just so excited to be here and so excited to offer this,” said Dillan Gibbons, FSU offensive lineman.

Dillan Gibbons described the moment when he finally reunited with his biggest fan, Timothy Donovan, after not seeing each other for over a year and they never missed a beat.

“It’s really surreal, just all the time, it’s been a couple of years and finally seeing him again and they’re picking up right where they left off, it’s great,” said Timothy’s father, Tim Donovan.

The former Fighting Irish lineman raised over $ 50,000 to bring Donovan to Tallahassee for a game that means so much to the two of them, but the family says it’s bigger than just the money.

“No, it’s not about, it really means most to us that Dillan is there for Timothy and the fact that we know if Timothy ever needs a friend or help with anything we can contact Dillan and he always will be there for him ”, explained Timothy’s mother Paul Donovan.

On Thursday, Timothy hit the rest of the offensive as they gathered for the pre-game pizza tradition. A moment he and Dillan were very excited about.

“I’m excited to just hang out with Dillan and everyone else,” said Timothy Donovan.

“I’m really excited that Timothy is enjoying the game and that the whole family is here and really making the most of it,” said Gibbons.

The family said they were grateful for the love they received from the Seminole community.

“It was really overwhelming and heartwarming to see how much you loved Timothy,” shared Paula Donovan. “I got the feeling that everyone in Tallahassee was expecting them and we’re just happy to be here.”

Despite being Notre Dame fans, the family says their alliance is with Dillan when it comes to the game.

The family say they will be at the game at Doak Campbell Stadium on Sunday night as they hope Dillan and the Seminoles start the season with a win.

Copyright 2021 WCTV. All rights reserved.

CDC advises unvaccinated folks towards journey over Labor Day weekend

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky advised unvaccinated people against traveling for the upcoming Labor Day weekend as the US battles a surge in Covid-19 hospital admissions from the highly contagious Delta variant.

“Given the current situation with disease transmission, we would say that people need to consider these risks for themselves when considering travel,” Walensky said during a Covid briefing at the White House Tuesday, noting that people who fully vaccinated and wearing masks can travel. “If you are not vaccinated, we advise you not to travel.”

Health systems in the US have struggled with record hospital admissions in the past few weeks, with several states including Washington, Mississippi and Florida all reached record highs in new Covid cases and hospital admissions.

The current seven-day average of new Covid infections in the US is 129,418 cases per day, a 10% decrease from the previous week’s seven-day average, Walensky said.

The seven-day average for Covid hospital admissions is around 11,500 hospital admissions per day, a decrease of about 5% from last week’s seven-day average, she said, citing data provided by the centers for that Disease control and prevention were collected.

Covid deaths had only increased 2.3% from the previous week to a seven-day average of 896 deaths per day, she said.

Walensky also recommended spending time with other vaccinated family members outdoors on Labor Day weekend and masking oneself indoors, especially in public, to prevent transmission.

“During the pandemic, we saw the vast majority of transmission among unvaccinated people happen indoors,” Walensky said. “Masks aren’t forever, but they are for now.”

Millennial Cash: Be able to work for Labor Day bargains

This Labor Day, some Americans will have extra cash on hand for holiday weekend shopping.

Some people padded their savings accounts by staying home during the pandemic. And some set aside the advance payments of the child tax credit they received, points out Amna Kirmani, marketing professor at the University of Maryland’s Robert H. Smith School of Business.

But consumers who are ready to spend will face the retail impacts of the continuing pandemic, supply chain interruptions and inflation.

Labor Day savings may not be as easy to spot this year, either online or in person. In fact, for some product categories, there might not be discounts at all.

Here’s what you need to know about the sales — and why you may have to work a little harder to find what you’re looking for on Sept. 6.

RETAIL FACES TOUGH SLOG

Ramping up production after last year’s COVID-19 shutdowns has led to ripple effects in the retail world.

“We have consumers who are believed to have quite a bit of money in their pockets, but the retailers do not have a lot of product,” says Tom Arnold , professor of finance at the University of Richmond’s Robins School of Business in Virginia.

“The supply chain issues are very real in that the retailers are having a difficult time getting product, and when they do get product, they are facing a higher cost for the product.”

That means some retailers are struggling just to fill their shelves. And if these stores don’t have much inventory to sell in the first place, they won’t be as motivated to discount the items they do have in stock.

Here’s how a retailer might be thinking about inventory: “In past years, I could have 100 units, thinking I could sell 50 at regular price, the next 30 at 25% off and then clear out with half-price,” Arnold says. “Well, this year I might only have 50 units and I might be able to sell all of them at regular price.”

SALE CATEGORIES ARE IN FLUX

As a result, Labor Day staples like car sales, appliance deals and mattress markdowns might not be a given in 2021 — or, not as impressive.

Products in low supply aren’t expected to be discounted much, if at all. That’s the case with some cars , Kirmani predicts.

You will, however, be able to find deep discounts on summer-related merchandise. Retailers will be motivated to unload whatever warm-weather inventory they have left over before consumers transition to fall. You can also expect clothing deals, as Labor Day falls within the back-to-school shopping season.

Promotions are expected to take place at big-box retailers, home improvement outlets, department stores and tech giants. For example, Wayfair, Best Buy and Macy’s have been known to offer Labor Day savings.

But, again, prepare for some of the discount levels to be modest.

“I think as far as Labor Day sales, they’re not going to be as good as they have been in previous years,” Arnold says.

SHOPPERS HAVE TO WORK FOR DEALS

If you choose to shop over Labor Day weekend despite the challenges, here’s how to maximize your money and increase your chances of finding a good deal:

— COMPARE PRICES. Comparison shopping on the internet is the best option for finding the lowest price, according to Kirmani. Seek out deal comparison sites and sales roundups that do the homework for you, or start monitoring prices yourself before Labor Day so you can judge the value of a sale.

— CHOOSE YOUR MODE OF SHOPPING. Browsing from home gives you the flexibility to visit countless sales in a short period of time — and the peace of mind of staying safe during the pandemic. But if you’re worried an item will be backordered, you may want to consider going in person instead to ensure you get what you want. Arnold anticipates the frustration of shipping delays could drive some shoppers to the store.

— WEIGH NEEDS VERSUS WANTS. Finally, consider how badly you need a particular item, Arnold suggests. If you need it right now, get it where it’s available. If you want it but could go without for a few months, try holding off until some of the supply chain issues are under control. Black Friday sales — which Kirmani says are historically better than Labor Day — will be coming in November. But it’s difficult to predict what those sales will look like this year.

The bottom line? Arnold says you can find some “good” deals this Labor Day, but they won’t be “fantastic.”

____________________________________

This column was provided to The Associated Press by the personal finance website NerdWallet. Courtney Jespersen is a writer at NerdWallet. Email: courtney@nerdwallet.com. Twitter: @courtneynerd.

RELATED LINK:

NerdWallet: The 2021 guide to maximizing your money https://bit.ly/nerdwallet-2021-guide

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Tesla Inventory Is Useless Cash. AI Day Will not Change That.

Text size

A Tesla logo can be seen on a Tesla Model 3 car

Nicolas Asfouri / AFP via Getty Images

Tesla is eagerly awaited Artificial Intelligence Day might not be enough to tear the stock off the recent one Trade range. For this to happen, bullish investors may have to wait until early 2022.


Tesla

(Ticker: TSLA) The stock fell about 1.6% in pre-trading on Thursday, which appears to be another difficult day for the market.

S&P 500

and

Dow Jones industry average

Futures are down 0.8% and 0.9% respectively. The S&P lost 1.1% on Wednesday.

Including the pre-IPO moves, Tesla stock is down about 4% year-to-date and 14% in the past six months. For every positive thing for the stock – better than expected, for example Merits and strong shipments – there seems to be a competing negative. Some of the negative aspects can be blamed on the company while others are beyond its control.

Rising interest rates, which hurt highly-valued growth stocks more than others, dragged Tesla stock down 15% in February. The company has no control over prices. And the global automobile Semiconductor shortage tracked all car companies year-round, making car deliveries difficult, despite the 2020 Covid-induced recession demand has been higher than expected.

Tesla is also haunted by safety concerns about its autonomous driving capabilities. NHTSA opens an investigation in 11 accidents with Tesla driver assistance functions. And Senators Richard Blumenthal from Connecticut and Ed Markey from Massachusetts sent a letter to the FTC asking the agency to look into Tesla’s marketing of its autonomous driving capabilities. Those two things could suppress a positive stock reaction to Tesla’s Artificial Intelligence Day, which is slated to begin Thursday evening.

Big Tesla events don’t always result in a positive stock bang. To get started, Tesla hosted a Autonomy Day in April 2019 that detailed advances in its self-driving technology. The stock lost about 3% over the next six months while the S&P 500 rose about 3%.

Tesla shares also fell by hers in the two days Battery technology event in September 2020. Still, the stock rebounded roughly 85% from the post-battery day decline to year-end. That’s a big step, but so was Tesla added to the S&P 500 between the battery event and the end of 2020.

A catalyst like the inclusion in the S&P 500 is not in sight in 2021.

Bullish investors may have to wait for new capacity to come online in Texas and Berlin, Germany for the stock to climb back up. More capacity would give investors confidence that the company can ship around 1.3 million units in 2022, an increase of about 50% from the 860,000 expected deliveries in 2021.

New productions, which would be reflected in quarterly statistics, would also give investors confidence that Tesla has the battery and microchip supplies it needs to meet its lofty growth targets.

The plant in Texas will manufacture the Model Y and the Cybertruck. The Berlin plant will manufacture cars for the European market. The Berlin plant would relieve Tesla’s plant in Shanghai in order to concentrate more on the Chinese home market. Both plants are scheduled to go online towards the end of 2021. CEO Elon Musk recently said that Tesla’s German plant could soon be ready to build cars than October.

After the capacity limit, Tesla investors will want another catalyst. That’s likely a car that is smaller in size and lower in price than a Model 3. The timing and details of the next product are unknown, but the bulls expect something to be shared in 2022.

Write to allen.root@dowjones.com

Independence Day: PM Modi continues with flamboyant ‘pagadi’ custom, sports activities Kolhapuri Pheta model safa with lengthy path | India Information

NEW DELHI: Prime Minister Narendra Modes continued his tradition of wearing a colorful safa (head covering) during his Independence Day speech to the nation at the Red Fort in the state capital.
The prime minister’s eye-catching choice of headgear, starting with the bright Jamnagar Pagdi, a Bandhani turban from Kutch on a Rajasthani Safa, has become a topic of discussion in the past.
That year, he opted for a Kolhapuri Pheta-style turban with a long trail that reached to his ankle when speaking to the nation on the country’s 75th Independence Day. He combined the Safa with a pastel blue half-sleeved kurta, now known as “Modi Kurta”, and a stole.
In 2014, in his first Independence Day speech, he wore a red jodhpuri bandhej turban with a green trail.
The next year, 2015, it was a yellow safa, while in 2016 it was a tie and dye turban with a pink hue.
In 2017 the Prime Minister wore a red and yellow turban, the next year, 2018, he wore the colors saffron and red.
In 2019, Modi decided on a predominantly yellow-colored, twisted headgear. It had hints of green and red along with a long trail that extended to his ankle. He kept the outfit simple as he wore a plain white half-sleeved kurta paired with his signature tight churidar.
Last year he opted for a predominant mix of orange and yellow colored headgear and, given the situation created by Covid-19, added a scarf, like a mask in white color with orange edges.
Every year the Prime Minister adds a pop of color to the Independence Day and Republic Day celebrations with a unique turban while trying on the traditional headdresses of different states that represent the diversity of India.
Regard Independence Day 2021: “Yahi Samay Hai, Sahi Samay Hai”, PM Modi recites a poem in the Red Fort