Heritage Days celebrates in type with wholesome crowds and extra

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark | For the republic

HOPE – As expected, the return of Hope Heritage Days after last year’s COVID-19 cancellation seemed like a big slice of Americana: a loud and proud, smoky, classic military flyover just after the national anthem and just before the Sunday afternoon parade.

Food from cotton candy to corn dogs to funnel cakes. A pioneering village with a rustic look at yesterday. And a shopping bazaar from toys to T-shirts.

Oh, and one more thing: healthy crowds, no pun intended, in the middle of the Delta variant.

Susan Fye, a volunteer at Pioneer Village, can vouch for this element as the 53rd annual three-day event began on Friday.

“I had never seen so many people on the square at the same time on a Friday night,” said Fye.

Jake Miller, chief executive officer of the organizing Heritage of Hope board, was more than satisfied on Sunday afternoon. He’d been hoping for record numbers to help nonprofits in the area recover a little from last year’s cancellation, and budgets and estimates from drone footage and more will tell him in a matter of days if this was true.

“I heard from several of our nonprofit sellers that they sold more Friday night than ever before,” Miller said. “And we’ve heard the same thing from a few others about Saturday being the greatest of all time.

“… Basically, this weekend was an absolute win for everyone. It was really bigger than we expected. “

He raved about being grateful to the volunteers, nonprofit leaders, attendees, and just about anyone else he could think of for making the event a resounding success.

The weather on Sunday was good enough to be mid-70s and super sunny. In the Pioneer Village, 10-year-old history buff Emma Oster tried again and again until she finally learned to walk on wooden stilts in a country house style. In fact, she even learned to walk backwards.

“Pioneer Village is really the only place where I’m not bored,” says Oster with a smile.

She loved it so much that she volunteered alongside Debra Slone Sunday and plans to do the same again next year.

In the middle of the shopping stalls, Gina Fisher found a Christmas T-shirt with a light flannel pattern that she had bought and that she will combine with matching pajama pants to sleep in style. All in all, however, she had pretty big eyes to catch her children parade with the Triton Central Marching Tigers.

“And this is the first time I’ve seen her,” said Fisher.

Edward Fye, left, teaches Allyson Baxter and Makayla Baxter how to dip string in wax to make candles at the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Sydnie Young introduces DMI, short for Pandemic, because then she was born, the goat of Victor Doty, while Ayana Young watches during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark |  For the republic

Sydnie Young introduces DMI, short for Pandemic, because then she was born, the goat of Victor Doty, while Ayana Young watches during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark | For the republic

Griffin Artis demonstrates the use of a compound bow with approximately 63 pounds of pulling force at Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Griffin Artis demonstrates the use of a compound bow with approximately 63 pounds of pulling force at Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Kate Phillips is spinning a Wollhof Carla Clark |  For the republic

Kate Phillips is spinning a Wollhof Carla Clark | For the republic

Susan Thayer Fye and Hannah Pruden show furs, skulls and shells from animals in the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Susan Thayer Fye and Hannah Pruden show furs, skulls and shells from animals in the Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Catey Fields and Piper Flannery learn to saw during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark |  For the republic

Catey Fields and Piper Flannery learn to saw during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, in the Pioneer Village. Carla Clark | For the republic

Beau McKinney uses the crank forge to demonstrate the blacksmithing art in the Pioneer Village during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Beau McKinney uses the crank forge to demonstrate the blacksmithing art in the Pioneer Village during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Finn, a German shorthair pointer, plays with the new dog toy that he as Vada Cramer-Burrus, Partner for Animal Welfare Society, Inc., and Billy Gray during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, 26. Clark |  For the republic

Finn, a German shorthair pointer, plays with the new dog toy that he as Vada Cramer-Burrus, Partner for Animal Welfare Society, Inc., and Billy Gray during the Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, 26. Clark | For the republic

Justin Gelfius gives Grane Gelfius a bite of his turkey leg during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Justin Gelfius gives Grane Gelfius a bite of his turkey leg during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Paige, Ella Erin and Avery Brown enjoy funnel cakes during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Paige, Ella Erin and Avery Brown enjoy funnel cakes during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

People picnic and visit Carla Clark |  For the republic

People picnic and visit Carla Clark | For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26th, 2021, people will queue up for food at the FFA booth Carla Clark |  For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26th, 2021, people will queue up for food at the FFA booth Carla Clark | For the republic

The Cottonpatch band will perform during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

The Cottonpatch band will perform during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26th, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

Wyatt Pate plays the Hoop Rolling Game in Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

Wyatt Pate plays the Hoop Rolling Game in Pioneer Village during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, people will line up at the food stalls at Carla Clark |  For the republic

During Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021, people will line up at the food stalls at Carla Clark | For the republic

People buy, eat and visit during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark |  For the republic

People buy, eat and visit during Hope Heritage Days, Sunday, September 26, 2021 Carla Clark | For the republic

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark |  For the republic

The shopping district is during Hope Heritage Days on Sunday, September 26, 2021, Carla Clark | For the republic

Leisure venues put together for a return to full-capacity crowds on June 4

News 12 employees

May 26, 2021, 9:21 p.m. EDT

Updated on:May 26, 2021, 9:21 p.m. EDT

Entertainment venues across New Jersey are preparing to welcome a full audience again – something they haven’t done in 15 months.

The Stone Pony in Asbury Park sets up the Southside Beer Garden next to the famous rock club.

New Jersey’s The Jerds will play the venue’s first public concert since the pandemic began on Saturday. But indoor shows may not be back for a while.

“We’ll be focusing on the South Side Beer Garden until we do our summer stage. But it will take months to really put things back together, ”says General Manager Caroline O’Toole.

The New Jersey Performing Arts Center is gradually making a comedy return to indoor shows next month. But these shows will be socially distant for the time being.

“You’re going to see a pretty busy schedule on NJPAC because not only is it what we’re booking, but there are pre-pandemic shows that we’ve postponed twice,” said David Rodriguez, executive producer of NJPAC.

The state of New Jersey lifts indoor capacity and social distancing limits for venues on June 4. It remains to be seen how ready the audience will be for the return. Officials say it will take time for many closed venues to book a full schedule for artists on stage.

Boat reveals are again and drawing massive crowds amid strong demand

Queen of the Show from the Orlando Boat Show.

Source: Marine Industry Association of Central Florida (MIACF)

Boat shows are back!

For both new and avid boaters, boat shows are one of the most important ways customers connect with the boat market. Last year, many events were canceled by the pandemic and organizers turned to online platforms instead. However, personal events are experiencing a revival, giving visitors the opportunity to discover a variety of boat types, sizes, brands, and additional equipment.

As the boat shows return, organizers find they are attracting more than expected crowds. The trend can reflect that strong demand for boats that the industry has seen over the past year. In 2020, boat, ship product and service sales hit a 13-year high of $ 47 billion as people flocked to the water to safely enjoy the outdoors.

The Orlando boat show hosted a personal indoor event earlier this month after a year-long hiatus due to Covid concerns. The event, attended by 21 dealers and more than 70 manufacturers, drew the largest crowd in a decade. According to a press release, attendance increased 66% compared to the event in 2019.

David Ray, executive director of the Central Florida Marine Industry Association, which hosted the event, said the group was stunned by its success as it expected a 20% to 25% decline in 2019.

“This was the best show we’ve ever had,” said Glenn Adams, the yacht and ship broker for Boat Max USA, who attended the event. “We were expecting fewer visitors than our first show in a showroom in over a year, but this was not the case.”

The event had over 500 boats to choose from, and sales at the event exceeded dealer expectations, Ray said. He wouldn’t reveal any specific sales data.

According to DiscoverBoating.comThis year 15 shows are slated to run, only two of which are virtual, including the Seattle Boat Show.

The Seattle Boat Show took place in January with 218 business partners. The four day online event consisted of live and recorded seminars on boating and fishing. Usually their personal shows showed over 1,000 boats while their virtual event could only show around 600.

More than 5,200 households have paid to take part in the online show. By comparison, the 2020 in-person event drew more than 45,000 people.

George Harris, president and CEO of the Northwest Marine Trade Association, the organizer of the event, said virtual events will never replace the experience of a personal boat show.

“A boat is an emotional purchase for people. They want to see it, they want to touch it, they want to smell it,” Harris said in an interview. He said he hoped they could hold a face-to-face event next year.

The National Marine Manufacturer’s Association, the largest boat show maker in the country, canceled its winter and spring shows this year due to the pandemic. However, most of their shows took place last year before Covid hit in March, association spokeswoman Sarah Salvatori told CNBC in an email.

The boat show season usually takes place in the fall and winter to prepare boaters for the high season in the warmer months of spring and summer.

In a research report, Jefferies analyst Randal Konik said recent channel checks showed that consumer appetite for boats remains high. Traders are pledging to buy inventory and internet traffic trends are still growing faster than they were before the pandemic.

Butler County leisure venues uncertain what influence new COVID-19 mandate can have on crowds

Under the plan, the city had 8-foot-by-8-foot squares – the size of two pieces of plywood side by side – eight feet apart, said Adam Helms, head of resident services for the city of Hamilton.

Helms hopes to use the same schedule this year for the 15 scheduled concerts held every week from late May to September, with the exception of Butler County Fair week.

He plans to put six people in each of the 100+ capsules, giving the venue a maximum of about 700 people, or 30 percent of capacity. The cost of each square ranged from $ 40 to $ 100, depending on the band.

The plan went “pretty well” last year, said Helms, who last summer didn’t add any cases of coronavirus that were attributed to RiversEdge.

Nancy Griffith, president of the Sorg Opera House Board, said the downtown Middletown venue could expand capacity from 230 to 280 following DeWine’s announcement.

Still, she said, patrons must wear masks and practice social distancing. The Sorg will host the play “Rumors” from March 5th to 6th, she said.

Adriane Scherrer, organizer of the Broad Street Bash, a summer concert series in downtown Middletown, said it was difficult to keep the crowd at 30 percent because she didn’t know the capacity. In the past the streets were closed and the crowd either sat in folding chairs or walked around.

She said the Broad Street Bash typically draws around 1,700 people to each of its concerts. She said bashes are scheduled for June 9th, June 23rd and July 14th, and the Broad Street Blast is scheduled for July 3rd.

One way to monitor the crowd would be to give out a limited number of wristbands to customers, she said.

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With no crowds, Louvre will get uncommon likelihood to refurbish | Leisure




Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa hangs on the wall in an abandoned Louvre in Paris on Thursday, February 11, 2021. The 518-year-old Mona Lisa will have seen many things in her life, but rarely: almost four months without visitors. In the Louvre in Paris, she stares through bulletproof glass into the now silent emptiness of the closed Salle des Etats.




The Louvre employees erected scaffolding in Paris on Tuesday, February 9, 2021. The forced closure has given museum officials a unique opportunity to carry out overdue renovations that were simply not possible with nearly 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Dancer Germain Louvet performs during the filming of a commercial at the Louvre in Paris on Thursday 11 February 2021. While empty corridors and empty galleries are a bleak sight for the frustrated art lover, they are a once in a lifetime opportunity to do renovation, refurbishment and re-ordering work that simply wasn’t possible with the roughly 10 million annual visitors.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Workers treat the painting “The Healing of Saint Bonaventure As a Child by Saint Francis” by Spanish painter Francisco de Herrera in the Louvre in Paris on Tuesday February 9th, 2021. The forced closure has given museum officials a golden opportunity to overdue Carrying out renovations that simply weren’t possible with nearly 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

A worker transports the painting “Portrait of Antonio de Covarrubias y Leiva” by the Spanish painter El Greco to the Louvre in Paris on Tuesday, February 9, 2021. Empty corridors and empty galleries are a bleak sight for frustrated art lovers, however, they are a once in a lifetime opportunity to do renovation, renovation and re-ordering work that simply wasn’t possible with the roughly 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Workers treat a bust of Charles Le Brun by French sculptor Antoine Coysevox at the Louvre in Paris on Wednesday February 17, 2021. It is uncertain when the Louvre will reopen after it closed on October 30 under French rules the government to contain viruses. But those lucky enough to benefit from a rare private look from collections that span 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

A man walks through the abandoned Louvre museum in Paris on Thursday February 11, 2021. It is uncertain when the Louvre will reopen after it closed on October 30, in line with virus containment measures taken by the French government. But those lucky enough to benefit from a rare private look from collections that span 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Workers are transporting a bust of Guillaume de Lamoignon by French sculptor Francois Girardon to the Louvre Museum in Paris on Wednesday February 17, 2021. The forced closure has given museum officials a unique opportunity to carry out overdue renovations that simply weren’t possible by almost 10 Millions of visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Louvre staff lift a painting titled “Christ on the Cross Adored by Two Donors” by Spanish painter El Greco when it returns from an exhibition at the Chicago Institute at the Louvre in Paris on Tuesday February 9th. 2021. The forced closure has given museum officials a unique opportunity to carry out overdue renovations that, with nearly 10 million visitors a year, simply weren’t possible.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Workers are editing a painting titled “Christ on the Cross Adored by Two Donors” by Spanish painter El Greco that is returning from an exhibition at the Chicago Institute in the Louvre in Paris on Tuesday February 9, 2021, the closure has the museum officials also given the unique opportunity to carry out overdue renovations that were simply not possible with nearly 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

The sculpture The Victory of Samothrace can be seen in an abandoned Louvre museum in Paris on Tuesday, February 9, 2021. It is uncertain when the Louvre will reopen after it closed on October 30, in accordance with virus containment measures taken by the French government. But those lucky enough to benefit from a rare private look from collections that span 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

A view of the hall of Greek sculptures in an abandoned Louvre museum in Paris, Thursday February 11, 2021. Although empty corridors and empty galleries are a bleak sight for frustrated art lovers, they are a golden opportunity to do works of renovation, refurbishment and re-orders that were simply not possible with around 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

The sculpture Winged Victory of Samothrace stands on a staircase in an abandoned Louvre museum in Paris on Thursday, February 11, 2021. It is uncertain when the Louvre will reopen after it closed on October 30 under French rules on virus containment measures by the government. But those lucky enough to benefit from a rare private look from collections that span 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

The sculpture “Grave monument for Francois-Louis de Bourbon, Prince of Conti” by the French sculptor Nicolas Coustou is covered with plastic film in the Louvre in Paris on Thursday, February 11, 2021.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Louvre workers are carrying a painting by Spanish painter El Greco entitled “Christ on the Cross Adored by Two Donors” that is returning from an exhibition at the Chicago Institute in the Louvre in Paris on Tuesday February 9th. 2021.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

The Venus de Milo sculpture in the background will be illuminated by a beam of light on Thursday 11 February 2021 in the Louvre in Paris. It is uncertain when the Louvre will reopen after it closed on October 30 under virus containment measures taken by the French government. But those lucky enough to benefit from a rare private look from collections that span 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Workers treat a bust of Guillaume de Lamoignon by French sculptor Francois Girardon at the Louvre in Paris on Wednesday February 17, 2021. Although empty corridors and empty galleries are a bleak sight for frustrated art lovers, they are a golden sight to renovate To carry out renovation and re-ordering work that was simply not possible with around 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

The Louvre employees will be pulling scaffolding in Paris on Tuesday, February 9, 2021. Empty corridors and empty galleries may be a bleak sight for the frustrated art lover, but a once in a lifetime opportunity to carry out renovation, renovation and renovation jobs that simply weren’t possible with the roughly 10 million visitors a year.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

Louvre Museum staff are treating a painting called Saint Louis, King of France and his side by the Spanish painter El Greco when it returns from an exhibition at the Chicago Institute in the Louvre Museum in Paris on Tuesday February 9th. 2021.




Without the crowds, the Louvre has a rare chance to renovate

A worker is cleaning the Marly courtyard in the Louvre Museum in Paris on Thursday, February 11, 2021. Gone is the stifling heat of the crowd, the pushing for a view and the constant cracking of cameras. It is uncertain when the most visited museum in the world will reopen after it closed on October 30 under virus measures taken by the French government.

By THOMAS ADAMSON and ALEX TURNBULL

PARIS (AP) – The 518-year-old Mona Lisa has seen many things in her life on a wall, but rarely: almost four months without a Louvre visitor.

As she stares through bulletproof glass into the quiet Salle des Etats, which was once the most-visited museum in the world, her famous smile could almost be relief. A little further away, the white marble Venus de Milo is exceptionally devoid of its belt of snapping visitors.

It is uncertain when the Paris museum will reopen after it closed on October 30 in line with the French government’s virus containment measures. But those fortunate enough to benefit from a rare private look at collections spanning 9,000 years of human history – with plenty of room to breathe.

That is usually sorely lacking in a museum plagued by its own success: prior to the pandemic, staff went out and complained that they couldn’t handle the overcrowding with up to 30,000-40,000 visitors a day.

The forced closure has also given museum officials the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to carry out overdue renovations that simply weren’t possible with nearly 10 million visitors a year.

In contrast to the first lock, which brought all activities in the Louvre to a standstill, the second around 250 museum employees were still fully operational.

An army of curators, restorers and workers clean sculptures, rearrange artifacts, review inventories, reorganize entrances and carry out restorations, including the Egyptian Wing and the Grande Galerie, the museum’s largest hall, which is currently undergoing a complete renovation.