Maryland Designer Creates Princess-Type Attire Targeted on Sustainability – NBC4 Washington

From her home in Maryland, Nadia founded Tandra Lunellery in 2020 with the help of family and friends in Indonesia she trusts in the fashion industry. Her clothing brand focuses on the small-scale production of clothes from selective, dead materials.

Nadia Tandra had a vision of working in the fashion industry.

Growing up in Indonesia, with her mother who designed clothes and her grandmother who ran a clothing factory, Nadia couldn’t wait to become a designer.

“I imagined this fashion world to be a magical place,” said Nadia. “But when I was growing up I realized that it wasn’t true.”

She was disappointed with fast fashion, a term used to refer to companies that overproduce clothing to suit fast-moving trends.

The number of items of clothing produced annually exceeded 100 billion for the first time in 2014. according to a study by McKinsey.

And the clothes consumers buy don’t stay in their closets. The US Environmental Protection Agency reported that landfills 11.3 million tons of textiles received in 2018.

“I was hoping to change that, give people a better option to shop online, do my best to be sustainable and ethical across my company and brand,” said Nadia.

The young designer said she was disaffected by the headlines of textile workers who work long hours and are underpaid. With the work of her grandmother, who set a good example, Nadia has created a brand with a small production team “that’s incredibly passionate about her work.”

From her home in Maryland, Nadia founded Lunellery in 2020 with the help of family and friends in Indonesia she trusts in the fashion industry. Her clothing brand focuses on the small-scale production of clothes from selective, dead materials.

Introduction of a brand

Lunellery dresses are not what consumers usually think of when it comes to sustainable fashion.

With fairy tales in mind, Nadia created the brand in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic to “escape into a magical world,” she said.

“I’ve always loved pinks and pastels, and I think there is a need in the market for affordable, sustainable princess dresses,” said Nadia.

Nadia designed the dresses with the idea that consumers would dress up for multiple occasions, including picnics – which have become popular during the pandemic.

“We focus on low waste, produce small quantities and test the success of each style and see what goes down with the customers,” said Nadia.

Photos: Maryland designer creates princess-style dresses with a focus on sustainability

She makes about ten to 15 pieces per style.

“I think we just want to make sure we don’t have excess waste because we just don’t want to pay tribute to pollution and landfill clogging,” said Nadia.

Janice Wallace is a DC sustainability expert that helps consumers build a more sustainable wardrobe. She said mass production and overproduction of clothing were two of the biggest factors behind the lack of sustainability in the fashion industry.

She cited companies like H&M as an example.

“What do you do with that excess? Often things get burned,” said Wallace.

The EPA reported that 3.2 million tons of textiles were burned in 2018.

Nadia hopes her brand can inspire consumers to think more about how their clothes are made.

Choosing the right fabric

The same fabric is used for different clothing designs at Lunellery. Nadia buys dead stock fabrics – textiles that a store has left over or is already available.

“I focus on fabrics that can be recycled,” said Nadia.

When Lunellery was first introduced, all dresses were made from 100% cotton and 100% polyester. Designers say that pure fabrics are easier to recycle and make into new garments than fabrics with mixed components – for example 60% cotton and 40% polyester.


“They’ll just go straight to the landfill,” said Nadia. “They don’t know what to do with these mixed components”,

Wallace says it is sometimes difficult for smaller brands to jump on board with sustainable fabrics. She said the problem is prices.

“When the bigger brands start using organic cotton and replace regular cotton, the price of organic cotton will eventually go down, making it easier for smaller brands to use organic cotton,” said Wallace.

As a small business owner on a budget, Nadia said it helped keep her inventory small to focus on quality and create timeless pieces that can be worn for a long time.

“We don’t want to be stuck with trends,” she said.

New app creates professional-style child pictures from the consolation of mother or father’s houses

News 12 employees

July 8th, 2021, 02:33 am

Updated on: July 8th, 2021, 2:33 am

There is a long tradition of parents taking their babies for professional photos – and an equally long tradition of these children not cooperating.

Westchester photographer Mary Jane Farnsworth and her business partner Yvonne Tully have found a way to take professional photos of your baby with a new app.

The couple say they made it Baby box studio after a less successful session with an exhausted mother and her newborn baby.

“I kept thinking, ‘Why can’t I take all these little tools that I have in my everyday parenting kit so they can bring it out when the baby is at its best,'” says Farnsworth.

And she did.

Proud parents just have to take a few pictures of their little angel with their smartphone at will and simply run the pictures through the app to choose a professional looking background.

“You don’t need to have great photographic skills to use this. This is for beginners who know how to use a smartphone, ”says Tully.

Sandia Labs creates software program exhibiting how a lot cash could be saved utilizing vitality storage

ALBUQUERQUE, NM (KRQE) – Sandia National Laboratories released a new software application that can help companies find out how much they can save by adding an energy storage system. The application called search, can also provide various scenarios and model the potential of solutions.

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In a press release, Sandia explains that renewable energy sources like solar panels and wind turbines do not produce electricity continuously. Energy storage systems such as lithium-ion battery-based designs and pumped storage hydropower can increase the stability and reliability of the power grid.

Quest has two tools, an enterprise and civil infrastructure analysis tool, and a market analysis tool that utility companies can use to assess how much revenue an energy storage system would generate. Sandia electrical engineer Tu Nguyen explains that the analysis tool can help companies or city project managers estimate how much money an energy storage system will save when combined with solar panels or additional power generators.

A consumer can enter their location and tariff structure that they are paying for, and they can also enter the type of renewable electricity system they have or want to install. Nguyen states in the press release that during certain times when demand is high, electricity providers typically charge more per kilowatt hour.

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By reducing electricity consumption during these times, the energy storage system saves customers electricity costs. Sandia reports that the market analysis tool was developed to help small utility companies understand how much revenue an energy storage system would generate by providing services to improve grid stability. The tool reportedly contains data for seven energy markets in North America.

Sandia also offers webinars and tutorials to help new software users understand how the software runs.

Richmond artist creates sneakers to boost cash for households struggling as a result of pandemic

RICHMOND, Va. (WWBT) – As the US economy continues to open up and many are back to work, there are still hundreds of families struggling financially.

Richmond artist Terrell Mack wants to help them put the right foot forward by donating the proceeds of his latest creation.

“I just want to help a family that has really been hit by the pandemic,” said Mack.

Mack is all about his community. NBC12 first introduced you to him two years ago when he was writing a coloring book for children entitled “ “The Blessed Book” aimed to stop violence.

“I wanted to find a creative way to keep them off the road,” said Mack.

Now he’s back with another artistic vision in the form of shoes called “Blessed B’s”.

“I chose this shoe because we just needed something positive,” said Mack.

This idea first came up in January when Mack contracted COVID-19, which resulted in pneumonia.

While one of the lucky few survivors, Mack decided to use his artistic skills to raise money for a family in need due to the pandemic.

“Some people give money, some give time, some give time. I only like to give my artwork to help someone else, ”said Mack.

The Blessed B’s are inspired by the Nike dunks, but each section of Mack’s shoes has a different theme that encourages positivity.

“I have a prayer hand … it’s a black hand and it’s a white hand, which means no matter what color … we can pray through whatever we want to go through,” said Mack.

The front of the shoe also reads “God’s Work” and the insole and back of the shoe have the scripture from Psalms 23: 1-6.

Mack says after all the recent violence and everything that’s happening in the world, the key for us is to keep a positive attitude and move forward. By creating these shoes, he is doing his part.

“The world is opening up, and if we all do our part, we can turn a better community into a better world,” said Mack.

The “Blessed B’s” adapt to the size. The size run is US men 7-13. There are five of each size for a total of 65 pairs. There will never be a replenishment, so go once – that’s it.

The link to pre-order shoes will be posted on May 16 at 12:00 noon. Acquire Click here.

Copyright 2021 WWBT. All rights reserved.

Outdated City Spring artist Jonathan Dow creates tree sculptures with shredded cash

SPRING, Texas – They say money doesn’t grow on trees, but Jonathan Dow wouldn’t agree. He is a money tree artist who opened a shop in the heart of Old Town Spring just over a year ago. Inspired by the bonsai, Dow has been creating these unique trees for some time.

He uses shredded paper to make the leaves. According to Dow, the destroyed money is available through the bureau for engraving and printing. He is allowed to use the currency for artistic purposes. Many people definitely notice it when they take a closer look at his creations.

Dow wraps the trunks and branches with hemp twine. The trees are mounted on driftwood and decorated with artificial moss for the finishing touches. The best part is that you don’t have to water them.

Dow says he got the idea years ago after receiving a small bag of shredded money as a gift. Consumers can purchase small quantities of the scraps at visitor centers in Washington, DC or Fort Worth. Dow accepted the novelty gift and created his first money tree while living in Florida. Since then, his creativity has jumped to the next level. You can buy one of its seedlings starting at $ 20, and prices go up depending on the size of the tree.

To see more of Dow’s artwork, visit his website Here

Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

Copyright 2021 California-Oregon Broadcasting, Inc.

Rogue Valley man creates intersection of leisure at elementary college

WHITE CITY, Ore. – A new border guard at an elementary school in White City attracts attention with his unique way of directing traffic and makes friends in the community.

While being a cross guard is a serious job, Mario Arenas makes sure people are safe and having fun at the same time.

“I’ve always loved working with kids. So it’s kind of a dream job, if you want to call it a job. I have fun with it from the moment I’m here until I leave,” said Arenas.

He started as a teaching assistant at Table Rock Elementary School just 7 weeks ago.

Arenas works in various small jobs on campus, but is becoming increasingly popular as the school’s new border guard.

“One of the areas where we needed assistance was the morning crosswalk. So one day we asked him for instructions and responsibilities, and then one day I looked outside and he was dancing. I said to the staff: “Is he dancing?” and they said “yes”. I watched him out there and it was great, ”said director Valerie Shehorn.

Shehorn says students and parents love to be, ‘Mr. Mario, as he is called, every morning.

“It was wonderful to have such a positive greeter on the corner, not only on cross-walk duty but also to really welcome our tiger community to school,” said Shehorn.

Arenas shows up every day to work in different outfits, but he says they are not costumes. “They really aren’t costumes because I wear them off duty, I just have them and I like to have fun.”

He even goes a step further during the holidays.

“If there’s a holiday, Cinco de Mayo, St. Patrick’s Day, whatever it is, Halloween, Christmas – I’ll have an outfit for it,” he said.

Prinicpal Shehorn says the school bought him his Table Rock Elementary sign because of his enthusiasm, adding, “Mr. Mario ‘has become part of the school culture this year.

“It’s something I don’t see anytime soon,” said Director Shehorn.

NBC5 news reporter Mariah Mills is from Medford. She graduated from the University of Oregon with a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She also studied sociology.

At school, she reported on Oregon athletics for the student-run Duck TV. When she’s not reporting, reading, hiking, and rooting for her favorite teams, the Seattle Seahawks and Oregon Ducks.

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mitú Creates 360º Music Ecosystem ‘Latido Music by mitú’ Devoted to Cross-Style Music Leisure for Latinos

LOS ANGELES & MIAMI – () – Are you missing out on the days of music television with non-stop music videos and artistic shows? today myth, the leading digital publisher for US Latino Millennials, announces the inclusion of Latido Music’s music video channel in Latido music by mitú, a fan-centric, cross-platform ecosystem with engaging social and editorial spaces focused on all things Latino music – from emerging artists to established icons in the US and internationally.

Mitú’s Latido Music integrates the classic 24-hour TV rotation of music videos in the style of the 90s from Latido Music and will improve the viewing experience with the debut of produced series and franchise companies such as shows in interview format, music and entertainment news as well as longer-format documentaries and talent profiles. The new content will be produced by an international team between Miami and Colombia led by veteran Telemundo and Discovery Channel executive Luciana Villalba.

“Mitú is one of the few English content platforms that celebrates everything Latino. So it was important for us to bring in Luciana, one of the leading experts who can produce compelling TV entertainment content but also understands how to adapt it to digital content. Millennial and Gen Z’s first social media ecosystem, ”said Stephen Brooks, President of mitú and Latido Music. “We are absolutely thrilled that she is running Mitú’s Latido Music.”

The Latido Music by mitú team will also expand the fan experience and create exclusive content and activations for Instagram, Facebook and TikTok. Mitú’s editorial arm creates related editorial content exclusively on mitú, including podcasts, music stories and price groups.

“Fans who grew up with MTV and VH1 have grown used to sharing and discovering new and classical music through their social media,” said Luciana. “It was important to us to transform and reinforce this shared love of music across social channels with more robust and exciting content. For the super fans, we will delve deeper into their favorite artists with new content and create a platform for emerging artists who did not have access to an international audience. ”

Latido Music from Mitus Original Content Slate is started with the following programming:

  • Brand Nu – What is Brand Nu in music? Here we present the best releases of the week and interviews with artists where they talk about the process of their new single / album / music video.

  • Super Secret Shows – A well-known music artist will perform a Super Secret Show for Mitu audiences through Zoom. Fans would need to log into the Mitú website to get the link to access the show.

  • What are you a fan of? – We are already fans of their music, but what do our favorite Latin American artists or one of their secret talents collect? This video franchise delves into the things they love: from sneaker collections, ticket stubs, recipes and much more.

Luciana added, “The special thing about Mitu’s production model is that we split our production studios between Miami and Colombia instead of centering them in Los Angeles. This allows talent outside of the US who are not yet flying due to pandemic travel restrictions to film in the location that is easiest for them and their teams. You don’t have to wait to fly to California just to film a segment or limit yourself to just one zoom option. This means higher production quality and more creativity in what we can show the fans. ”

Mitú’s Latido Music is now available to all mitú and Latido Music viewers as well as to the free Latido Music streaming TV channel on SlingTV, Xumo, Vizio Watchfree, Plex, Samsung TV +, Roku, Amazon FireTV, Android TV and Apple TV available. It will also be available for download in the Latido Music App for iOS and the Google Play Store.

For more information or to start the party, go to latidotv.mitúnetwork.com and follow on social media: Instagram, Twitter, Tick ​​tock and Facebook.

About the myth

mitú is a digital media company using a Latino POV for mainstream entertainment across multiple platforms. Our audience is 200% – teenagers who are 100% American and 100% Latino – who inspire us to write authentic, culturally relevant stories. We’re reaching a massive, intercultural audience that will soon be the majority of the youth in the United States. Our audience each month consists of nearly 100 million people in the United States who receive over 400 million content views and over 120 million video views monthly. For more information on mitú, see www.wearemitú.com.

East Bay Lady Creates Scavenger Hunt for Group Leisure – NBC Bay Space

Copyright © 2021 NBCUniversal Media, LLC. All rights reserved

S.F. Board of Supervisors creates Music and Leisure Venue Restoration Fund

Lynn Schwarz, co-owner of Bottom of the Hill, poses for a portrait at Bottom of the Hill, San Francisco’s venue, which has been closed since March 2020. Schwarz recently spoke publicly at a meeting of the regulators’ budget and finance committee calling on them to support the San Francisco Music and Entertainment Venue Recovery Fund. Photo: Marlena Sloss, special for the chronicle

The San Francisco board of directors unanimously voted Tuesday, February 9, to set up a San Francisco Music and Entertainment Venue Recovery Fund to provide grants to venues hit by the pandemic.

The mayor’s office pledged $ 1.5 million to the fund suggested by supervisor Matt Haney in December. Any venue that meets at least two of the following criteria will be given priority: 1) There is an “imminent risk” of being closed. 2) it is at least 15 years old; 3) it’s an official legacy business; 4) its maximum capacity is less than 1,000 customers; 5) It is important for a particular cultural district.

The Office of Small Business will manage the fund in collaboration with the City Controller, the Office of Economic and Workforce Development and the Entertainment Commission.

“We anticipate that many of these venues will also have access to federal funds from the Save Our Stages stimulus,” supervisor Haney told The Chronicle after the fund was handed over. “But we don’t want to take any chances with these venues because they are so unique and important. We want to make sure there is a special fund in place to make sure they are not left out. “

Lynn Schwarz, co-owner of Bottom of the Hill, poses for a portrait at the venue. Schwarz is optimistic with the adoption of the San Francisco Music and Entertainment Venue Recovery Fund. “I’m just very hopeful that we can save the scene for the first time,” says Schwarz. Photo: Marlena Sloss, special for the chronicle

Immediately, the San Francisco organizers celebrated the approval of the fund, despite realizing that $ 1.5 million won’t go very far.

It’s extreme, extremely wonderful, ”said Lynn Schwarz, partner at Bottom of the Hill, where she is also the lead booker and bartender. The Portrero Hill venue has some cash to pay the bills thanks to a grant from the Hellman Foundation (which oversees the annual Hardly Strictly Bluegrass music festival at Golden Gate Park) and other sources, but Black estimates those dollars will run out next Month.

“I am very grateful that it finally happened. Personally, I wish it had happened a little sooner, ”said D’Arcy Drollinger, owner and artistic director of the Oasis gay nightclub in South of Market, adding that $ 1.5 million.is not a number that is going to have a significant impact on all of the venues that so desperately need them. “

D’Arcy Drollinger illuminates the ghost light on the stage of his Oasis nightclub in San Francisco. Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle

Mickey Darius, general manager of the Lost Church (another Hellman Foundation grantee), says the mayor’s $ 1.5 million allocation “shows that we worked as a squeaky wheel, but it doesn’t ensure that the Lost Church gets some of it. (The fund had no money behind it when Haney first suggested it.)

Darius added that local event associations he belongs to – a fundraising group called the Independent Venue Alliance and a lobby group called the San Francisco Venue Coalition – have conducted internal surveys to get a more accurate estimate of real needs for the nightlife and entertainment industry. Using anonymously submitted data on profits, losses and the number of employees, the groups calculate that they will need $ 48 million to cover their losses.

“We don’t try to do things like, ‘Oh, if we ask, we just let them turn the tap on,” said Darius. “We try to be realistic about what we ask.”

To that end, Schwarz and Darius hope the venues can make up the difference with the help of the private sector, and Haney supports that opportunity.

“We’re going to put a vehicle across the city so people can donate to the fund,” he said, citing the precedent of Give2SF, the city’s COVID relief fund, which accepts private donations. However, this new vehicle would be intended for entertainment venues. He also noted that the Venue Relief Fund is permanent and hopes it can top up its coffers as part of the city’s next budget cycle.

Lynn Schwarz, co-owner of Bottom of the Hill, poses for a portrait at the venue. Photo: Marlena Sloss, special for the chronicle

At stake is the city’s identity – a San Francisco without venues like Bottom of the Hill “wouldn’t be the city a musician would want to live in,” said Schwarz, while Drollinger said Oasis couldn’t go on without help.

“I am heavily in debt. The association is heavily in debt. I’ve put my savings into it. I’m all there, ”he said. “It’s so frustrating to say, ‘You can’t start your business and we won’t find any help for you.’ ”

Even so, Drollinger has adapted during the pandemic, creating meals on heels where a drag queen brings a gourmet meal to your home and performs a lip-syncing concert outside your door. Oasis TV with the news and gossip segment “Hot Trash”; Rooftop and parklet food when no closings are imposed on the city; the Suds & Studs fundraising campaign, “a socially distant, large gay car wash”; and now trivia and bingo as virtual team building activities for companies.

D’Arcy Drollinger brushes a wig for drag shows at his Oasis nightclub in San Francisco. Photo: Paul Chinn, The Chronicle

“It feels like we’ve kept starting new businesses,” he said, adding that each of those new businesses has startup costs and each network is often only enough to pay its employees.

Insurance, rental, and utility bills are not lost, and minor expenses add up. Drollinger still needs to fix the alarm system if it breaks, or replace the outside TV screen if it’s stolen, or repaint the building if it’s destroyed. Fixing a leak in the locker room isn’t going to happen – although it’s now damaged wigs, he said.

And he put on 40 pounds from the stress.

I keep asking myself, “What’s the worst that can happen?” The worst that could happen is that Oasis doesn’t exist for a while like it does now, ”he said. “I can’t even wrap my head around this reality.”


  • Lily Janiak

    Lily Janiak is the theater critic for The San Francisco Chronicle. Email: ljaniak@sfchronicle.com Twitter: @LilyJaniak