‘The Mumbaikar’ provides metropolis its personal cowl artwork in model of New Yorker journal

THE FAST LIFESTYLE, the influx of people, and cramped housing are some of the things that make Mumbai and New York sound like twin cities. It was surely the experience of Breach Candy resident Rachita Vora that led her to create works of art that connect two of the world’s greatest cities.

The series adapts the covers of “New Yorker” magazines and replaces the art with scenes from Mumbai. A couple on Marine Drive, a crowded train compartment, or a rainy day are well-known Mumbai experiences that Vora highlights.

The digital illustrations are titled “The Mumbaikar”, a game with the New Yorker and its iconic font. Vora, 39, said the Mumbaikar series pays tribute to two at once. “I’ve always loved New York magazine and its art. And I thought the pun would be interesting, ”she said.

Vora is the co-founder and director of India Development Review (IDR), an independent media platform for the development community. She is also doing an animated series for IDR called This Nonprofit Life.

Self-taught artist Vora rekindled her childhood love for art with online tutorials, including one on linocuts, during this pandemic. About a month ago she started the series The Mumbaikar on Instagram and with seven illustrations so far, she has received several requests for specific city vignettes and people to be represented, such as the Dadar flower market or the Dabbawallas. The series will conclude with an upcoming eighth work and is for sale as a print.

“I didn’t choose any typical images like Gateway or CST. I wanted the illustrations to have meaning for me and my relationship with the city, ”Vora said, citing an illustration called Mumbai by Night and Day, which contrasts the sprawling informal settlements with skyscrapers.

From 2005 to 2006, Vora spent a year in New York after graduating from Yale University. Noting the similarities between Mumbai and New York, such as their rich street culture and diversity, she noted that “both are brave, very rewarding, but also unforgiving”.

The iconic New Yorker typeface used for the cover and headlines was set by the magazine’s first art director, Rea Irvin. The unique Irvin font named after him is easy to distinguish and has strong brand recall. In the Mumbaikar series, Vora’s hand-drawn fonts are stylized in the style of Irvin.

The audience in Mumbai caught on with Vora’s series.

One of the works shows Shiv Shanti Bhuvan, a historic Art Deco residential building in the Oval Maidan. One resident was delighted to find that Vora had illustrated her bedroom window. Another shows a handcart on a beach with a selection of chaats. “Chaat on the beach is a childhood memory. Chaat and Mumbai are synonymous to me, ”said Vora.

Palms on the Potomac | Cowl Story | Fashion Weekly

For this farewell-to-summer excursion we’ll follow blue highways, the stuff of country music lyrics, those roads less taken that are devoid of Sheets or Wawas. Perhaps we’ll find some mom-and-pop-run oases and meet some interesting folks.

Blue highways are no longer shown on maps in blue ink as Rand McNally did when cartographers used red to delineate major thoroughfares. But on a steamy August morning recently, for the third time this year, Style Weekly photographer Scott Elmquist and I are following mostly blue highways for a 90-minute drive to Colonial Beach, which fronts the Potomac River on the Northern Neck. It’s a destination many Richmonders seldom visit, though it’s roughly 60 miles from both Washington and Richmond.

On our two previous excursions we’d motored west to Scottsville and south to Keysville, respectively. For our excursion to seasonally bustling Colonial Beach, a one-stoplight town once known as “Reno on the Potomac,” I bring a 70-page Virginia map book published by DeLorme. It’s one of those slightly oversized publications that are full of colorful topographic detail and sold in convenience stores and filling stations. My colleague Scott humors me, but he is fine with a GPS system. 

We both clutch Starbucks coffees. Is that cheating? One thing about blue highways is that you shouldn’t expect anything specific, even hot coffee. But you will find something, guaranteed. 

Leaving town we follow U.S. Route 301 north through Hanover County. We cross the Pamunkey River into Caroline County and pass through a relentless swampy stretch that continues over Polecat Creek and the Mattaponi River. Veering east at Bowling Green, Route 301 becomes a straightaway through dense forests that define much of the terrain of the Fort A.P. Hill Military Reservation. We comment on the bizarreness of the American military being trained here and dutifully going forth in the name of a Confederate general. But then again, the statue of Gen. Ambrose Powell Hill Jr. in Richmond is still a Lost Cause vestige marking a major crossroads at Hermitage Road and Laburnum Avenue. 

Moving beyond Fort A. P. Hill, within a few minutes we arrive at the all-but-lost town of Port Royal, population 210. Although this burg can easily be missed, it was a thriving Rappahannock River port town from the 1600s to the 1800s when tobacco was shipped downstream. To picture the place, imagine what Williamsburg would look like today if the Rockefellers hadn’t come along in the 1920s and applied their Standard Oil fortune and fancy Boston architects to its restoration. Here, unexpectedly we confront traces of another Civil War figure considerably more notorious than A.P. Hill, John Wilkes Booth. He was a 27-year-old actor when he assassinated President Abraham Lincoln in Washington in April 1865. A historical marker in front of a large frame house explains that this was the place where Booth was captured after being chased and shot to death 10 days after fleeing the scene of the crime. A creepy exclamation point to reading about the violence that occurred here were a bevy of huge vultures perched stoically atop the roof and chimneys of the weathered house, their black coats of feathers glistening in the morning sunshine. Scott and I didn’t tarry.

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  • Scott Elmquist

  • Vultures preen atop the Richard Garrett house in Port Royal, a Caroline County town. John Wilkes Booth, Abraham Lincoln’s assassin, died on this porch in April 1865 after being tracked down and shot.

Driving five blocks, we exit Port Royal, cross the Rappahannock River and arrive in picturesque King George County. After a brief drive through lush farmlands, we turn east at the village of Edgehill and onto state route 205. Soon we are in Westmoreland County. We arrive in Colonial Beach and although we can see the Potomac River in the distance, we pass through town to its eastern edge to arrive at a wooded historical site, the James Monroe birthplace. Monroe (1758-1831) was the fifth president and a popular one. He spent the first 17 years of his life here on the then-500-acre farm before beginning a life of public service. In light of our fraught political times, it’s hard to believe that he faced no opposition in his successful run for a second presidential term in 1820.

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  • Scott Elmquist

  • The birthplace of the fifth U.S. president, James Monroe, has recently been rebuilt on its original foundations and is the newest attraction in Colonial Beach.

We stroll around the stalwart frame dwelling built on the foundations of the house where Monroe was born. It sits in a grove of trees and is visible from highway 205 beyond a flurry of state and national historical markers. The multiyear restoration is nearing completion by the James Monroe Memorial Foundation. Archeological work was conducted by the College of William & Mary and the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation executed the architectural work. Landscaping and furnishing the place is a work in progress. Of the eight Virginia-born presidents, there is only evidence of what two of their birthplaces actually looked like: this house and the Woodrow Wilson birthplace in Staunton. Plans call for replanting orchards and re-creating houses for enslaved people and other structures that once populated this 18th and early 19th century farm. 

Just beyond the modern reception center and museum is a so-called Time Trail, a half-mile, aggregate-paved and oyster shell-deckled walkway. Here we meet an engaging woman walking her dog. Vivian Lee Messner, with Barney tugging on a rope good-naturedly, says she was named for the famous screen actress, but doesn’t explain why her name isn’t spelled Leigh like the star of “Gone With the Wind.” We chat at one of the regular intervals on the trail where large granite slabs and benches are engraved with information pertaining to Monroe’s life and times. “This path leads to water and a canoe launch,” Messner explains. 

Since we’d introduced ourselves as day trippers to Colonial Beach making our first stop near town, she cheerfully says that she’s a 26-year resident of the town. Although born in West Virginia and reared in Framingham, Massachusetts, she says she loves it down here. “I love Virginia. When my company, Geico, moved me for a time to St. Petersburg, Florida, I cried. When I heard I was being transferred back here, I went hopping through the office: ‘Yahoo, I’m going home,’ I yelled.” 

And this come-here clearly knows the territory. She recounts that in 2017, she ran for the Democratic nomination for a seat in the House of Delegates. While she lost to an opponent who ultimately lost to a Republican, Messner says she carried several counties in the primary. “Everyone should do it,” she says of running for office.

When asked for the inside scoop on Colonial Beach, she quickly suggests that there are two schools of thought among the residents. “Some people, the old timers, want to keep the town old timey,” she says, “others want change.”

Internet access is “iffy” she adds, while tourism development is always an issue. She explains that there is a public sculpture project downtown and along the beachfront that has many folks wondering if the money might be better spent on more pressing infrastructure needs.

“A major issue is that folks from around Washington, D.C., are moving down, buying houses and causing costs to be jacked up,” she says. “What some home builders are charging is highway robbery.” 

We ask for breakfast suggestions.

“Lenny’s is where the old timers go,” she says, while “the Colonial Buzz Espresso across the street from Lenny’s is more hip.”

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Vivian Lee Messner, a long-time Colonial Beach resident, walks Barney along the Time Trail at the Monroe birthplace. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • Vivian Lee Messner, a long-time Colonial Beach resident, walks Barney along the Time Trail at the Monroe birthplace.

For a county steeped in 18th-century architecture and lore, George Washington’s birthplace and Stratford Hall, the ancestral home of the Lees, are near Colonial Beach. Meanwhile, our breakfast spot, Lenny’s, is a local institution with an authentic midcentury modern vibe. The restaurant’s shallow A-frame exterior silhouette gives way upon entering to an outbreak of turquoise blue. Every table and booth in the L-shaped space is filled with a customer mix equally Latina, Black and white. Scott orders pancakes and sausage and I have an omelet.

It’s late morning, spirits are high and no one seems in a hurry.

“Take care,” shouts the Rev. K. Lionel Richards, who is dining at a table, to a friend who is exiting the diner. Adds the Rev. James Johnson while laughing, “It’s a hard job but someone has to do it.” A few minutes later, Richards, 69, explains that both he and Johnson are pastors of nearby congregations, Mt. Olive Baptist Church and Maranatha Bible Church, respectively. “Things are going pretty smoothly considering the COVID,” says Richards of his flock and the church’s programs. “People are trying to get back out. We have between 30 and 50 attendees at services now.” 

As we leave Lenny’s, I scan a number of the photographs and newspaper clippings that hang throughout the restaurant. The eatery was opened in 1978 by Leonard Skeens, who operated it until his death in 2007. Today it is run by his stepdaughter, Brandy Robinson, who we observed this busy morning in high gear. One of the newspaper clippings stresses how Lenny’s has played an important generational role in the life education of scores of teenagers and young people in Colonial Beach. They had their first real jobs there – and Skeens was considered a tough task master: His mantra: “If you have time to lean, you have time to clean.” 

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The Rev. K. Lionel Richards, a local pastor, enjoys breakfast at Lenny’s diner. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • The Rev. K. Lionel Richards, a local pastor, enjoys breakfast at Lenny’s diner.

Leaving Lenny’s we cross Colonial Avenue, the main road to the beach and a strip of suburbia – if only a hint. We stroll onward to Colonial Buzz Espresso and approach a woman and man enjoying a late-morning beverage. They lounge in chairs under stylish blue fabric swaths that are billowing next to the cottagelike coffee house. The friendly pair asks us where we ate breakfast and light up when we tell them Lenny’s.

“That’s where each of us had our first jobs,” says the woman, who was with her son, and who politely declined to give their names.

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River, land and sky: The path of Irving Street follows the Potomac through much of the town of Colonial Beach. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • River, land and sky: The path of Irving Street follows the Potomac through much of the town of Colonial Beach.

Finally, on to the beach!

At two and a half miles, Colonial Beach is the second-longest bathing beach in Virginia. The freshly groomed sand extends flush to the concrete boardwalk. Shade trees – mostly sycamores and a few specially planted (and unexpected) palm trees offer a shady respite for those without beach umbrellas.  

We drive along Colonial Avenue to where it reaches River Edge Inn, a large motel at the far western edge of the boardwalk. The walk extends eastward to border the north side of the tight downtown street grid. We examine a piece of realistic, newish-looking sculpture that depicts two apparent visitors to the beach dressed in late-19th century attire. It is a reference to the town’s founding as a summertime escape hatch for Washingtonians in the pre-air conditioning era. Strolling along we notice a number of piers. The town pier and visitor center is on Hawthorn Street. Most of the downtown buildings are one and two stories except for the hulking Potomac Renaissance condos near Irving Avenue. There is an unassuming flair to many of the buildings and the appearance of places that have been patched up and maintained over the years. Little is showy.

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A sculpture depicting two Gilded Age vacationers greets beach goers on the waterfront at Colonial Avenue. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • A sculpture depicting two Gilded Age vacationers greets beach goers on the waterfront at Colonial Avenue.

An exception is the Riverview Inn at 24 Hawthorn St. It is an art deco marvel with curved brick walls and a brightly colored exterior. There is nothing quite like it in Virginia. It looks, well, jazzy. It recalls an era when Colonial Beach was known – not always fondly – as a gambling destination. So gambling was legal in Virginia back in the day? No, but interestingly the southern border of Maryland extends to the low water mark along the south bank of the Potomac. Therefore, when you go into the water along Colonial Beach, you are wading or swimming in Maryland. Taking advantage of Maryland’s considerably more liberal gambling laws, savvy entrepreneurs built piers from the boardwalk into the water with gambling operations, including slot machines at the ends of the piers. 

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The eye-catching art deco Riverview Inn is a short walk from the beach. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • The eye-catching art deco Riverview Inn is a short walk from the beach.

One of the charming things about Colonial Beach is walkability. And the number of golf carts rolling through the streets seems to exceed automobiles. We didn’t see many cyclists. Among those we meet today on the beach are two day-trippers from Washington, Deja Robinson and James Knighton.

“We’d heard about Colonial Beach word of mouth and today is my birthday,” Robinson says. As she lies on a blanket, her companion eats slices of fresh fruit, apparently purchased before leaving the city at Whole Foods from the looks of a brown grocery bag. “Do you know of any beaches nearby that don’t have jellyfish?” asks Robinson with a wince. I didn’t have the heart to tell these city folk that those stinging critters come with the territory and they are just as prevalent in the Atlantic Ocean at Virginia Beach, the state’s longest beach.

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The Colonial Beach boardwalk is shaded by indigenous sycamore trees and specially planted palms. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • The Colonial Beach boardwalk is shaded by indigenous sycamore trees and specially planted palms.

Colonial Beach is a pleasantly sized peninsula that narrows to four blocks wide as one moves toward its end. At First Street the blocks become residential and from First Street to the Colonial Beach Yacht Center, at the tip, the town looks its best. Dozens of heartbreakingly attractive beach cottages front Irving Avenue, which overlooks the Potomac. With relatively few shade trees, each of the houses reflects the distinct tastes of its builder or owner. For a beach mostly off-the-beaten path for 150 years, there is an understandable, low-key variety. From Victorian cottages to stalk modernity, the houses seem to coexist beautifully. The back streets closer to Monroe Bay – Lossing, Bancroft and Marshall avenues – are lined with modest-sized showstoppers.

One of the largest riverfront cottages is the 1885 Bell House at 821 Irving St., a Queen Anne-style confection that also exhibits rare stick-style tendencies. The latter architectural style, exalting in showy, sharp-pointed carpentry, was more popular in the Northeast. This startling-looking place is a vacation home of Alexander Graham Bell, the inventor of the telephone. He inherited it from his father and retreated from Washington here from 1907 to 1918. Locals will tell you that Bell experimented while in residence with modest-sized flying machines that were launched from the front, third-story balcony.  

of inventor Alexander Graham Bell that was built in 1885. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • of inventor Alexander Graham Bell that was built in 1885.

Colonial Beach has a wide range of dining options. One popular spot is High Tides on the Potomac with its Black Pearl Tiki bar that dominates the boardwalk with its Disney-like design and decor recalling the set of the CBS reality show, “Love Island.”

Kara Allison serves a lunch at Wilkerson’s restaurant, a riverfront destination on McKinney Boulevard. - SCOTT ELMQUIST

  • Scott Elmquist

  • Kara Allison serves a lunch at Wilkerson’s restaurant, a riverfront destination on McKinney Boulevard.

Before departing Colonial Beach, Scott and I decided to drive a few miles to the edge of town and the considerably more sedate Wilkerson’s Seafood Restaurant, a local destination for 40 years. He visited the salad bar and I had the seafood platter, including a crabcake, while enjoying the 270-degree panoramic view of the water and countryside. It felt like being on a ship and the clientele was decidedly more Gilligan’s, in an affectionate way, than “Love Island.”

Child on cowl of ‘Nevermind’ sues Nirvana alleging little one pornography

Spencer Elden, the man who appears as a naked baby on Nirvana’s “Nevermind” album, is suing the band for the photo of child pornography.

The lawsuit, filed Monday in the US District Court for the Central District of California, accuses Nirvana of violating federal child pornography laws in using the image and is calling for a jury trial.

30-year-old Elden is seeking $ 150,000 in damages from each of the 15 named defendants, including Nirvana, Warner Records, Universal Records, band members Dave Grohl and Krist Novoselic, Courtney Love (executor of Kurt Cobain’s estate), Guy Oseary and Heather Parry (as administrators of Cobain’s estate).

Spencer Elden, the man whose unusual baby portrait was used on one of the most iconic album covers of all time, Nirvana’s “Nevermind,” filed a lawsuit alleging that the nude photo portrayed child pornography. The image shown is a cropped version.

Source: ebay

Elden’s attorney said at least 40 or 50 photos were taken at the time, but the image selected showed Elden “like a sex worker – reaching for a dollar bill dangling from a fishhook in front of his bare body.”

The filing claims that Elden and his parents did not sign a release allowing use of the images.

Elden’s lawyer claimed he suffered from the album cover and will continue to suffer lifelong damage.

Elden recreated the photo more than once, most recently for the 25th anniversary of the album. At the time he said he wanted to pose naked, but the photographer “thought it was strange”.

Elden had expressed mixed feelings about the album cover but had never referred to it as child pornography.

According to the lawsuit, Nirvana sold more than 30 million copies of Nevermind.

Universal Media Group and Warner Music Group, the parent company of Warner Records, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

County asks state for cash to cowl hearth survivors’ rebuilding charges – Ashland Tidings

Andy Atkinson / Mail TribuneRuss Dodd works on building his son’s new home while his grandchildren review the floor plan.

Fees add thousands of dollars to the cost of rebuilding a home

Jackson County is asking Oregon lawmakers for nearly $ 9.6 million to cover the planning and construction costs survivors face in rebuilding their destroyed homes and businesses.

Permit, planning, and community development fees can cost $ 11,339 for a 2,500 square foot home, according to Jackson County employees.

The data can cost $ 17,621 for a typical business and $ 2,533 for a newly constructed home, data shows.

It is up to the state legislature to decide whether the county’s application will be funded.

“It’s a reasonable question. Let’s hope we make something of this, ”said Rick Dyer, Jackson County commissioner.

In addition to the funds to cover fees, the county is requesting $ 710,000 for contracts with outside workers to improve building application processing.

The goal is to create a faster approval process that can process applications in five to seven days, said County Administrator Danny Jordan.

The reconstruction of homes destroyed by the Almeda fire along the Oak Crest Way between Phoenix and Medford is under construction. Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune

The Almeda fire, which broke out from Ashland to the outskirts of Medford in September 2020, destroyed nearly 2,500 homes and more than 170 businesses.

The fire in South Obenchain in rural north Jackson County destroyed more than 30 homes and more than 50 other buildings, including outbuildings.

Jackson County was hardest hit by the September 2020 fires, which destroyed more than 4,000 homes nationwide. The fires were fueled by unusually hot weather, low humidity, prolonged drought, and strong winds, resulting in the greatest loss of homes to fires in Oregon’s history.

The state has already allocated $ 2 million in grants to local jurisdictions to support forest fires, but Jackson County is filing nearly $ 10.4 million to cover fees and additional dwarfs that make up that cash pool.

“The $ 2 million won’t go far – and we’re asking a lot more than that,” said Ted Zuk, director of development services for Jackson County.

Andy Atkinson / Mail Tribune Construction is underway to rebuild homes destroyed by the Almeda fire along the Oak Crest Way between Phoenix and Medford.

Unincorporated parts of Jackson County suffered about half of the building losses from the Almeda Fire, with Phoenix and Talent making up most of the remainder.

Talent is also asking Oregon legislature for millions of dollars to help cover fees for those in the process of rebuilding, said Jamie McLeod-Skinner, Talent’s interim city manager.

“We are trying to rebuild our entire community and bring attention to the needs of our community,” she said. “If the legislature can increase and cover the fees, we would be happy if this happens. We recognize that people who had to flee for their lives have been burdened. “

Houses under construction stand in the midst of rubble that has yet to be freed from the Almeda fire. Vickie Aldous / Mail Tribune

McLeod-Skinner said she has confidence that state lawmakers representing Rogue Valley will stand up for the cities and the county.

“I just hope they can convince their colleagues,” she said.

The City of Phoenix is ​​also working on a funding request to cover the fees, but doesn’t yet know how much it will seek or how much waiver it can offer for the release of survivors, said Joe Slaughter, director of Phoenix Community and Business Development.

Rebuilding fees are a heavy pill for homeowners who paid the fees once the first time they bought their homes. In addition to labor, material, and other costs, fees are part of the price of building a home.

Sam Sabori (left) and Randy Dodd are working on a new interior wall for Dodd’s house. His previous home outside of Phoenix was destroyed by the Almeda fire. Vickie Aldous / Mail Tribune

Fee exemptions would provide some relief to the survivors of the fire. Many don’t have insurance to cover the full cost of building a new home, and the price of building materials has skyrocketed in the past six months, said Brad Bennington, executive officer of the South Oregon Builders Association.

“I agree with the county that it is not fair to ask someone to pay dues if it is not their fault that their home was destroyed in a fire. If the state offered relief, that would be a good and sensible thing, ”he said.

Bennington said city and county planning departments are funded by fees so they need a source of money to cover their jobs.

He said not only have thousands of people lost their homes, but hundreds of millions of dollars in property have been removed from tax rolls in a matter of days.

A variety of jurisdictions are losing property tax revenues that support vital services such as schools, libraries, law enforcement, and fire safety.

“Aside from alleviating human suffering – many people have lost their homes and all their belongings – there is an economic reason to rebuild as soon as possible,” said Bennington.

Reach the Mail Tribune reporter Vickie Aldous at 541-776-4486 or valdous@rosebudmedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @ VickieAldous.

Cowl that purple nostril! Circus pageant adapts to virus guidelines | Leisure




The dancers from left to right, Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Valentino Martinetti from Argentina, Marius Fouilland from France and Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts can flourish between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts who are behind the legendary spectacle.




The French tightrope walker Tatiana-Mosio Bongoga presents her documentary about her performance on a 400-meter tightrope walker, which was hung at a height of 40 meters without protection over the Vltava River in Prague in 2019 during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the Libertivore Company present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, south of France, Wednesday 3rd February 2021. It was a tough year for the performing arts in most countries, with virus bans canceling shows and formwork locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Dancers play “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the French choreographer Sylvie Guillermin with the circus company Archaos, which shows student acrobats and dancers in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Friday, February 5th , 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive between the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Sylvie Guillermin, choreographer of “Parallèle 26”, a creation by the Archaos circus company with student acrobats and dancers, prepares the stage in the Theater de La Criee during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Friday February. 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers from left to right, Tasha Petersen from Argentina, Lucille Chalopin from Paris, Marius Fouilland from France and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company play “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on the basis of Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake the BIAC, International circus arts biennial, in Marseille, south of France, Thursday 4th February 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancers Tasha Petersen from Argentina (above) and Joaquin Medina Caligari from Uruguay from the Eolienne company prepare for the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, before. South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Marius Fouilland from France of the Eolienne company prepares before the presentation of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th , based on 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The backstage room at The Docks Des Suds is empty with a plaque reading “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Art Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Die Circus Biennale demonstrates how the performing arts can thrive between the rifts, and celebrates the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

A banner announces the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, which will take place behind closed doors at the Archaos Circus Compagnie Theater in Marseille, southern France, on Thursday, February 4th, 2021. The fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts have a way of thriving between the cracks and celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende prepares for the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021. The Die fourth edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The Brazilian performer Alice Rende stretches before the performance of “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a room delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The acrobats Gioia Zanaboni from Italy (above) and Anja Eberhart from Switzerland from the Zania company practice outside in a public park because their training room is closed before they present their acrobatic show “Never Retiring” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale. in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Performers present “Periple 2021”, a six-month non-stop circus performance organized by the six jugglers that make up the Protocole collective, during an event only for professionals, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, on Friday in Marseille, southern France , insists, February 5, 2021. It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive among the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Yoann Bourgeois, French choreographer and co-director of the National Choreographic Center of Grenoble, takes part in interviews during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday February 3, 2021.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The cultural concert hall at Docks Des Suds, which was closed for a year with a badge that reads “Emergency Exit” during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, South of France, Thursday February 4, 2021 A tough year for the performing Arts in most countries where virus bans cancel shows and shuttering locations. But the world’s best circus festival, the Circus Biennale, has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been there.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

Brazilian performer Alice Rende warms up before performing “Passages”, a contortionism creation in a space delimited by a Plexiglas box during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday February 4, 2021. The fourth Edition of the global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine-stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The dancer Lucille Chalopin from Paris from the Eolienne company stretches before the performance of “Le Lac des Cygnes” by Florence Caillon, based on Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, Thursday, February. 4, 2021. The fourth edition of the Global Circus Biennale shows how the performing arts thrive among the cracks, celebrating the death defying and spine stretching arts that are behind the legendary spectacle.




Cover that red nose!  The circus festival adapts to the virus rules

The actors Pauline Barboux and Jeanne Ragu from the company Libertivore present their show “Ether” directed by Fanny Soriano during the BIAC, International Circus Arts Biennale, in Marseille, southern France, on Wednesday, February 3, 2021.

BY THOMAS ADAMSON and DANIEL COLE

MARSEILLE, France (AP) – It’s been a tough year for the performing arts in most countries. Virus locks have canceled shows and shuttering locations.

But the world’s best circus festival has found a way to thrive between the cracks of the rules – even without the large crowds that would normally have been around.

The fourth edition of the Circus Biennale (BIAC), which takes place every two years in the south of France and ends on Saturday in the Mediterranean port city of Marseille, celebrates the anti-injury and spine-stretching arts that fuel the famous spectacle.

More than 110,000 people attended the last BIAC in 2019. This year it had up to 2,000 visitors, all professionals who work in the circus or want to buy shows.

This, too, is proof of the determination and determination of the organizers who have skilfully adapted their festival to the rules and regulations of the French authorities.

“We started with a plan A, then with plan B, then with plan C, then with plan D, and finally we decided on plan E, which was a biennial for professionals. That was possible, we were allowed to do it, ”said BIAC organizer Raquel Rache de Andrade.

The dozen of performances included upside down tutus, acrobatic bikes, brightly colored parachutes, and enough contortionism to shock a chiropractor.