English Cottage design fashion, impressed by Cotswolds, was embraced in Lancaster [architecture column] | Structure

LANCASTER IN STYLE, PART 21: ENGLISH COTTAGE STYLE, 1920-40

Adorable is an adjective we don’t often associate with any architectural style, but it is the perfect description for English Cottage. As one of the various styles of the interwar period, the English Cottage developed between 1920 and 1940 as an affordable option for the popular Tudor Mansion movement.

The English Cottage, described as cozy and comfortable, is characterized by flat roof lines and the occasionally steep “cat slide” gable.

Exterior materials are combinations of stone, brick, and stucco; Windows are wings that reflect their European “out-swing” heritage. The one- and two-story buildings are modeled on the cottages of the Cotswolds in England and are often set between trees and flower gardens with an arched front door. The tall, stacked chimneys often appear at the front entrance, creating a unique silhouette and skyline for passers-by.

This English cottage-style house has nested gables, a steep sloping roof, and dormer windows and casement windows.

Built around 1928 in a wooded setting on Wilson Drive, this English cottage-style home features a slate roof, classic dormer windows and a stone fireplace.

HG English Cottage 1 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style home features old peasant brickwork, cast stone Tudor arch, rare stone torches above the entrance, a cat sunroof, a tapered chimney and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 4 D 9 Paul Myer's Residence 1.jpg

This vintage photograph shows a house built for Paul Myer on Marietta Avenue around 1928. Henry Y. Shaub was the architect of this English cottage-style house with a wooden porch, stone veneer and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 5Paul Myer's Residence Architecture D9.jpg

This photo shows a residence built for Paul Myer around 1928. This English cottage style home is in a wooded setting on Marietta Avenue in Lancaster.

HG English Cottage 6 D9 Archtecture.jpg

This English cottage on Jackson Drive has a slate roof, stone and stucco facade, and a flared eaves at the entrance.

HG English Cottage 7 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage-style house, built around 1928 on Wilson Drive, has a stone facade, dormer windows, an arched chimney off the main entrance, a cat sunroof, and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 8 D9 Sears Catalog Architecture.jpg

The Mitchell was a 1928 English cottage style house that you could see in an artist rendering in the Sears & Roebuck catalog. It was advertised for $ 2,122 and had a tall chimney and cat-slide gable at the entrance.

HG English Cottage 10 D9 Architecture.jpg

Architect Melvin R. Evans designed this English cottage-style house in 1929 with steep roof lines, stacked chimneys next to the arched brick entrance and casement windows.

HG English Cottage 11 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage style house goes well with his garden on Wheatland Avenue in Lancaster. It features a slate roof, stacked chimneys, a flat dormer window, casement windows, a stone facade, and tile accents,

HG English Cottage 12 D9 Architecture the Cotswolds.jpg

The Cotswalds region of southern England has stone cottages with tiled roofs, dormers, rose-clad walls and extensive gardens.

HG English Cottage 13 D9 The Cotswolds Architecture.jpg

Located in the Cotswalds, southern England, this cottage has a thatched roof, dormer window and gardens.

HG English Cottage 14 D9 Architecture.jpg

This house in Glen Moore Circle won the Lancaster New Era 1923 Prize Home Contest. Designed by architect Henry Y. Shaub, it is in the English cottage style, with a stucco facade, wooden veranda brackets and a cat sunroof.

HG English Cottage 15 D9 Architecture.jpg

1926 Edgar Hess Willow Street Pike Henry Shaub Architect Details include dormers, cat sliding gables, casement windows and arched entrance 1

HG Englitsh Cottage 2 Architecture D9.jpg

Built prior to 1928 for James G. Haller, this English cottage-style house features a distinctive chimney off the entrance, flat dormer windows, and an arched entrance with wrought iron belt hinges.




HG English Cottage 3 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style house has nested gables, a steep sloping roof, and dormer windows and casement windows.




Built around 1928 in a wooded setting on Wilson Drive, this English cottage-style home features a slate roof, classic dormer windows and a stone fireplace.




HG English Cottage 1 Architecture D9.jpg

This English cottage-style home features old peasant brickwork, cast stone Tudor arch, rare stone torches above the entrance, a cat sunroof, a tapered chimney and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 4 D 9 Paul Myer's Residence 1.jpg

This vintage photograph shows a house built for Paul Myer on Marietta Avenue around 1928. Henry Y. Shaub was the architect of this English cottage-style house with a wooden porch, stone veneer and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 5Paul Myer's Residence Architecture D9.jpg

This photo shows a residence built for Paul Myer around 1928. This English cottage style home is in a wooded setting on Marietta Avenue in Lancaster.




HG English Cottage 6 D9 Archtecture.jpg

This English cottage on Jackson Drive has a slate roof, stone and stucco facade, and a flared eaves at the entrance.




HG English Cottage 7 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage-style house, built around 1928 on Wilson Drive, has a stone facade, dormer windows, an arched chimney off the main entrance, a cat sunroof, and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 8 D9 Sears Catalog Architecture.jpg

The Mitchell was a 1928 English cottage style house that you could see in an artist rendering in the Sears & Roebuck catalog. It was advertised for $ 2,122 and had a tall chimney and cat-slide gable at the entrance.




HG English Cottage 10 D9 Architecture.jpg

Architect Melvin R. Evans designed this English cottage-style house in 1929 with steep roof lines, stacked chimneys next to the arched brick entrance and casement windows.




HG English Cottage 11 D9 Architecture.jpg

This English cottage style house goes well with his garden on Wheatland Avenue in Lancaster. It features a slate roof, stacked chimneys, a flat dormer window, casement windows, a stone facade, and tile accents,




HG English Cottage 12 D9 Architecture the Cotswolds.jpg

The Cotswalds region of southern England has stone cottages with tiled roofs, dormers, rose-clad walls and extensive gardens.




HG English Cottage 13 D9 The Cotswolds Architecture.jpg

Located in the Cotswalds, southern England, this cottage has a thatched roof, dormer window and gardens.




HG English Cottage 14 D9 Architecture.jpg

This house in Glen Moore Circle won the Lancaster New Era 1923 Prize Home Contest. Designed by architect Henry Y. Shaub, it is in the English cottage style, with a stucco facade, wooden veranda brackets and a cat sunroof.




HG English Cottage 15 D9 Architecture.jpg

1926 Edgar Hess Willow Street Pike Henry Shaub Architect Details include dormers, cat sliding gables, casement windows and arched entrance 1




HG Englitsh Cottage 2 Architecture D9.jpg

Built prior to 1928 for James G. Haller, this English cottage-style house features a distinctive chimney off the entrance, flat dormer windows, and an arched entrance with wrought iron belt hinges.

The English cottage style uses the “dormer” detail to shorten the overall height of the building and provide more floor space on the second floor. The dormer closes flush with the outer wall and breaks through the eaves, whereby the

Signature effect.

Elements made of heavy wooden beams and consoles, especially on the porches, additionally reinforce a medieval connection. The style’s popularity continued to grow when mail order companies such as Sears & Roebuck offered complete English Cottage house kits for $ 1,500 in the 1920s and 30s.

Interestingly, a parallel style called the Storybook Style developed in Hollywood, California, transforming the English Cottage into a fairytale-like appearance with whimsical roof lines, crooked doors and windows, and in some cases thatched roofs.

Lancaster Architects C. Emlen Urban, James H. Warner,

Henry Y. Shaub and Melvern R. Evans quickly embraced the English Cottage style and added it to their growing portfolio. There are exceptional examples of this quaint style across the county, particularly to the west of the city. The style is now over 100 years old and nature has worked its magic to bring the “delightful” cottages into their perfect setting.

What are the interwar styles?

The styles that developed between WWI and WWII were English Cottage, French, Dutch, and Spanish Revival.

What is a Cat Slide Gable?

It is effectively a regular gable roof with one side that goes deeper to the ground. The name comes from the idea that a cat thrown on the roof will “slide” to the ground.

Why don’t we see thatched roofs in Lancaster County?

The thatched roof requires a very steep roof of over 45 degrees to quickly drain away water and snow. In addition, handicrafts and materials for roof assembly would have to be imported from Europe.

Contributing to this column is Gregory J. Scott, FAIA, a local architect with more than four decades of national experience in innovation and design. He is a member of the College of Fellows at the American Institute of Architects. E-mail GScott@rlps.com.

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Did the Authorities Steal Your Cash? Gary Silverman column

We started last week with a refresher on the three biggest misconceptions I’ve made about social security – pension benefits in particular. Here is a summary of the first two:

Misconception # 1: “The money I put into social security is my money.” Not true … Your social security taxes are a tax that is primarily used to fund current retirees … they become dependent on taxes be that your grandchildren pay.

Misconception # 2: “The social security system is running out of money.” That is not true, but it is no longer possible to pay what was promised in full, and that is not a good thing. But as long as they keep taxing us, there will be money for some measure of benefit.

Misconception # 3 remains: “The government stole all (or most of) the money in the Social Security Trust Fund, which is why the system goes bankrupt.”

Reality: Okay, let’s answer that with a scenario. Let’s say you deposited money in your bank and bought a five year CD. What do you think the bank is doing with your money? It doesn’t put it in their vault to sit and collect dust.

If they did, they’d have to charge you for holding instead of paying you interest. No, they take your money and lend it to people who buy cars, buy houses, start a business, or for a myriad of other uses. These borrowers pay the bank interest, and so as a depositor, you earn some interest.

If you read “They’re taking your money,” you didn’t think they stole it. This is the agreement you make when you do business with a bank: you can use it and pay you interest in return. However, in very similar transactions with the Social Security Trust Fund, the “bank”, in this case the government, is accused of stealing the money.

Here’s what really happens when it comes to social security. The trust fund contains money. As stewards of the money, the people who run this thing buy government bonds (I remind you that the world has proven time and time again that US Treasuries are the safest place to invest).

These government bonds pay interest just like a bank CD pays interest. The government then uses the money at its own discretion. When the bond matures, the state will pay back the money borrowed to the trust fund.

Just like the bank, the government didn’t steal the money anywhere in the process.

While I’ve dispelled (or at least cleared) some common myths about Social Security, it should be noted that the system is not designed to pay currently promised benefits.

And these promises don’t have to be kept, according to the Supreme Court. If Congress does nothing, the system can still pay out benefits. However, these benefits must decrease by around 25% (on average).

So this means it is time again to pat Congress on the back and remind them to get down to work. I just hope they’ll listen instead of throwing mud at each other – and getting us dirty in the process.

Gary Silverman, CFP®, is the founder of Personal Money Planning, LLC, a Wichita Falls retirement planning and investment management firm, and the author of Real World Investing.

Column: Cash would not purchase happiness

“Money doesn’t buy happiness.”

The age-old saying always seems like a controversial saying and you may or may not agree with it depending on your financial situation.

It is undeniable that when you are rich you can participate in more opportunities and buy more things. At the same time, while we all strive for material prosperity, we must remember that money is not everything.

College students can resonate with this message, especially since we are constantly looking for new internships or jobs with good earning potential. It can be easy to get lost in the search for good careers or high salaries – but it shouldn’t be one or the other.

For some it may be material wealth, and there is nothing wrong with that. For many of us, however, I would bet that we would say that our family, friends, romantic relationships, helping others, or admiration are the things that make us happy.

Money can’t buy your partner’s real love or your friends’ friendship. Nor can it buy the good feelings associated with physically helping and serving those in need and seeing the smiles your actions bring to the less fortunate.

Here are some reminders that money is not correlated with happiness.

Happiness comes from doing the things we love, not what we buy.

Happiness is a state of mind, not a physical object. You might have material need but still be content with your life through the relationships you have or the things you do. While it is true that wealth can make life easier and give you access to more objects and activities than you otherwise would have, money cannot buy you happy relationships with friends or family.

In AMC’s Breaking Bad, for example, the main character Walter White wins everything – money, power and respect – but he also loses everything. His family hated and denied him, his partner betrayed him, and all the money in the world couldn’t cure his cancer. As college students, with money we can get dinner with friends on Franklin Street or tickets to games, but it cannot ensure happy relationships with the people we love most.

At the end of the day, the relationships we have with others and with ourselves become more important.

Another common saying is, “It doesn’t matter where you are, but who you are with”.

Although this is more likely to be associated with romantic relationships, in this case it is still true because even if you can’t afford to go on expensive vacations or buy fancy things, you can still be happy by being with Hang out with your friends in your hometown or nearby to spend quality time with your family. Likewise, money cannot guarantee that you will be satisfied with your life.

Stephen Goldbart, co-founder of the Money, Meaning & Choices Institute, explains that suddenly getting rich can be a painful psychological experience for some people, and that it is easy to find yourself in and out of an identity crisis at the same time Dealing with loneliness and frustration.

Just as money is temporary, the happiness it brings is also temporary.

While it may be nice to be able to buy whatever you want at any time, even the best cars and clothes wear out over time. Our material wealth will be useless if we all die at some point, but the memories and experiences you have with your family and friends will last a lifetime.

For example, if you look back on your early teen years, you will likely remember your first date, the times you had trouble with your friends at school, or other things you did with your friends and family , and not your first paycheck.

It will never be “enough”.

Even if people become more wealthy, many will always want more. A study by Michael Norton, a professor at Harvard Business School, suggests that even when we acquire an obscene amount of wealth, the instinct to compare ourselves with others doesn’t stop and the rhetorical question, “Am I?” better? “than before?” only drives people’s desire – including the rich – to want more. Therefore, it can turn into a vicious cycle in which you are always obsessed with getting wealthier, which means that you will never be really satisfied or happy with what you have.

Although a lot of money can solve many of your problems and offers many opportunities and experiences, I want to remind people – especially students – that their pursuit of happiness is not the same as their pursuit of wealth.

@ raymondpang17

meinung@dailytarheel.com

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Lifeless bushes and lacking cash — State Journal report from 125 years in the past | Column



Angular screw station

The Angle Worm Station at Barnes Boat Dock on Lake Monona in Madison was the site of a bruise and a lost wallet in 1896. The station got its name from its owner and operator Captain Frank Barneswho gave a speech on July 4th every year on how civilization depends on earthworms, according to the Wisconsin Historical Society.


WISCONSIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

This summary of the State Journal’s local news ran on August 1, 1896:

Hundreds of dead trees can be seen along Lake Mendota Drive. Last summer’s drought killed them.

Williamson Street is delighted that William Mueller opened a world-class bakery down there.

A man painting telegraph poles along Main Street’s business district attracts the attention of dozens of people with nothing else to do.

The joinery at the intersection of South Hamilton and Fairchild Streets, which had long been in the hands of the late SL Chase, is now run by Henry Skidmore.

Dr. CA Harper bought the old Durrie homestead on North Carroll Street from EJ Foster for $ 6,300; The lot is 66 x 132 feet and is considered a bargain.

Yesterday afternoon, after James Gallagher suffered bruises from buckling part of the platform at Angle Worm Station, he lost a wallet between $ 4 and $ 5.

The next thing for entertainment lovers will be a lumberjack picnic in Cross Plains on Sunday. Madison will provide the speaker in the person of Mr EW De Bower.

North Henry Street, from Mifflin to State, is to be greatly expanded and the residential buildings on it will be supplied with a sewage system. The macadamization of West Dayton Street from Henry to Broom will begin at an early stage.

Kids and Cash: A Widespread Financial savings Program for Individuals with Disabilities [Column] | Cash

ABLE is growing rapidly.

Five years after its introduction, the ABLEnow savings program has reached a so-called milestone. Currently accounts in all 50 states and some in the District of Columbia hold over $ 100 million in assets for over 12,000 account holders.

It’s not as poor as a tax-friendly savings program for the disabled that isn’t as well known as its cousin, the 529 University Savings Plan.

The ABLE account was created by Congress in 2014 and introduced state-to-state two years later. It saves people with disabilities various skilled disability expenses such as education, transportation, housing and vocational training. , Designed to be funded.

The kickers are: As long as the eligibility rules are adhered to, account holders can use ABLE without endangering the eligibility of government programs such as Medicaid and additional security insurance.

Account earnings (formerly the Achieveing ​​a Better Life Experience Program) are exempt from federal taxes, and states can also offer tax incentives. The account can be opened by anyone who develops a disability before the age of 26. As with your 529 account, family and friends can contribute.

The annual donation amount for 2021 is capped at $ 15,000, but the total amount for your account cannot exceed $ 500,000.

According to ISS Market Intelligence for the first quarter of 2021, the average account balances of $ 8,368 are well below those limits.

The national ABLEnow program is administered by the Virginia 529 program, the largest university savings plan in the country. Accounts are not yet sponsored in all 50 states, but qualified individuals are not required to open an account in their home state. Several programs, including Virginia, are open for national registration, according to the ABLE National Resource Center.

ABLEnow account holders can choose from several investment options depending on their risk tolerance and there is no minimum deposit or registration fee. Some programs may require a monthly account service fee of $ 3.25 and some asset-based fees. (For more informations, www.ablenow.com).

Individuals can also open an account through the ABLE America Plan, a partnership between ABLEnow and the American Funds Group.

Last year, the new ABLEnow accounts increased 10% and the average portfolio increased 24% through May 2021.

The growth can be due to several factors including a focus on economic controls on accounts, people spending more time at home and focusing on savings, and of course, rising stock markets.

Mary Morris, Virginia Chief Executive Officer said:

But for many skilled people with disabilities, ABLEnow’s report may seem “too good and untrue,” said Morris.

“When you state that the funds in your ABLEnow account will not affect disability services and benefits, many people are used to not being able to save money or plan for the future, so look for one Hook, ”she says. Said.

According to Morris, supporters are turning to social media using webins and other video conferencing tools to spread information about ABLE. A message worth sharing.

Children and Money: A Popular Savings Program for People with Disabilities [Column] | money

Source link Children and Money: A Popular Savings Program for People with Disabilities [Column] | money

LeVar Burton claims to host “Jeopardy!” – Completely [Unscripted column] | Leisure

I’m not the ordinary “Jeopardy!” Observer. When it’s on, sit down and watch, but don’t actively attend the show every night.

But I say this: LeVar Burton will be the perfect host to replace the slow and great Alex Trebek full time.

Burton is an actor whose career spans generations. The fun “say how old you are, not how old you are” game consists in asking someone about the role that best remembers Burton.

People my age know Barton best, perhaps as the host of the educational children’s show “Reading Rainbow” or the quack voice of the lesser-known ’90s cartoon “Captain Planet and the Planet.” Will be. Older generations remember him best as Kunta Quinte in the 1977 miniseries “Roots”. He played with then-star OJ Simpson.

For me, he’s always been Lieutenant Geordi La Forge on Star Trek: The Next Generation.

For a new generation of television viewers, Burton can now be their Alex Trebek: a kind and kind guy with all the answers.

And that would make him perfect.

Burton is already going “Jeopardy!” According to a petition that garnered hundreds of thousands of signatures, I was there as a guest from July 26th to 30th. But the 13 Emmy winners are more than just innkeepers. He must be a full-time employer.

Most of it is because the most direct and obvious aspect of Burton’s personality is the tenderness he exudes. That’s part of what made it so well suited to Reading Rainbow and the ecology-focused Captain Planet. That’s why Geordi La Forge has become a personable character despite a few shortcomings in the series’ “Trek” writing room. That’s the main reason the audience took root in Kunta Kinteh many years ago (along with the dire plight the character went through as a result of the actual event).

Burton has also long served as the guiding light of wisdom and has spent decades promoting literacy and education of children through Reading Rainbow and other endeavors. His longstanding philanthropy was recognized by the Penn / Faulkner Foundation, which nominated him as the first literary champion in history.

He is also a leader in breaking representation barriers in the mass media and one of the most prominent black TV stars for over 40 years. It would be fair that he would be the first black presenter on “Jeopardy!” A move to bring him together with Steve Harvey as one of the few moderators on a minority game show.

Burton’s own room also has a pretty obvious elephant. He really really wants a job.

When he created, he essentially said the same thing Change.org In April I applied for the next “Jeopardy!” Host. The petition received over 250,000 signatures.

Don’t make fun of some of the other “Jeopardy!” Either! Innkeeper.

The majority of the show’s guest presenters are journalists and news anchors. Most of these innkeepers are successful people who already have a good reputation in a particular field.

I’m sorry, but I cannot convince myself that Aaron Rodgers and Dr. Oz will be leaving her successful career to host a game show.

The only seemingly legitimate candidate for a full-time restaurateur is Ken Jennings of Jeopardy! Fans remember that in 2004 he set the longest winning streak in the show’s history. He’s already made an appearance when he hosted the show for six weeks earlier this year.

There are also two of Lancaster’s very own Brad Rutter, youngest fan favorite James Holsauer and the show’s highest earning champion. Former participants are not currently listed with prospective innkeepers and do not seem interested in taking on this role.

But LeVar Burton, who has spent most of his career in and around television production and, more importantly, actually begging for work, fits in a lot better.

This is not illegal for Jennings and other restaurateurs with shows. Many of these part-time presenters, especially news anchors who are already familiar with speaking in front of television cameras, likely have or will likely do a great job.

Burton’s personality and career made him perfect for appearances, and not just because he is an actor with extensive film experience.

Burton’s kindness, generosity, and pioneering history are perfect for the show.

And that’s exactly the kind of television that we really need at this time.

“Unscripted” is a weekly entertainment column produced by a team of writers.

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LeVar Burton claims, “Jeopardy!” – Permanent [Unscripted column] | entertainment

Source link LeVar Burton claims, “Jeopardy!” – Permanent [Unscripted column] | entertainment

Children and Cash: Constancy youth funding app targets Gen-Z and past [Column] | Cash

When you ask teenagers to name their favorite shoe and apparel company, fast food restaurant, or cell phone retailer, brands like Nike, Chipotle, and T-Mobile are high on many lists.

But what is the favorite investment brand among teenagers? Loyalty wants to be the one.

This is a motive for the introduction of the new product “Youth Account” from Fidelity Investment. Jill Schlesinger previously mentioned the Fidelity Youth Account in her 31st column. Here’s a deeper look into the new product.

The Fidelity Youth Account is designed for teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17 and includes a mobile app with optimized money management functions and content for teenagers to save and invest in.

Fidelity has long promoted a wide variety of educational information for young investors on its website. And the investment giant has marketed its Roth IRAs and other investment products to a younger clientele. But the new youth account, launched after a test with families last month, is much more ambitious.

The Fidelity app can be used to trade stocks, exchange traded funds or mutual funds. The account comes with a debit card and can be linked to Venmo and PayPal apps for peer-to-peer payments.

To sign up, a teen only needs one parent with a Fidelity account who will keep an eye on their young investor (s) and be notified when a trade is placed or the debit card is swiped. But unlike other products on the market, parents cannot block transactions.

Teenagers have their own logins and passwords that parents cannot access. Likewise, teenagers cannot access their parents’ Fidelity account.

There are no trading commissions, no subscription fees, no account fees, no minimum investment requirements, and no domestic ATM fees.

The accounts enable fractional trading and give youngsters the opportunity to like less than a full share of stocks in popular companies. to buy Amazon.com and Microsoft, which are currently selling for hundreds or thousands of dollars.

How many children want to invest in the stock market? The stock market used to be a foreign land to high school children. But not anymore.

These standards make it imperative that parents and their young investors keep lines of communication open and talk about stock picking and other investment strategies.

Young investors flocked to the market during the pandemic, especially as Robinhood and other trading apps became the platforms of choice for buyers rocketing stocks of GameStop, AMC Entertainment, and other companies.

Fidelity has 26 million retail brokerage accounts, including many with teenagers. Investors opened 4.1 million new brokerage accounts in Fidelity in the last quarter, and 40% of those were opened by those under the age of 35.

Fidelity is promoting the Youth Account to teach teenagers about money management, setting investment goals for long term and other major financial education concepts. During the testing period, Fidelity said 90% of parents said they sat down with their teen and used the account as a classroom moment.

I am for anything that teaches teenagers how to use money responsibly, especially so many who don’t know much about the ways of Wall Street.

But make sure you’re comfortable with this wrinkle: when teenage investors turn 18, their teenage account will automatically switch to a Fidelity Standard Brokerage Account. So this product is more than just Investments 101, it is a bold move by Fidelity to build long-term customer relationships.

Photographer is an artist who collects gentle [Unscripted column] | Leisure

Lavender oil, Jewish bitumen. And a pinhole on a tin board that roughly does the elegant work of the human eye.

On the morning of 1826, a mechanically bent Frenchman gathered them all up, straightened the box from the window over the roof of a dull barn, and invented the picture.

Of all the arts, photography is not to be respected, admired, or pretended to be understood. And I’ve worked with newspaper photographers for almost 40 years.

The photographer’s medium is light, light itself, and what Einstein told us is more realistic than time, but scientists are trying to define it. Shall we call it power? It’s not even clear whether to call it a wave or a particle. As a verbal person, it feels like free fall.

When I wrote a history column in my last newspaper, an old man told me about a forgotten cemetery I knew in the Avondale woods. One day the photographer and I went there, picked him up, and went hunting.

Maybe she knew that, she was suspicious, but it was a beautiful spring day.

The three of us ran around the hill talking about the past. We never found a grave.

However, I remember how intrigued the photographer’s clear eyes were, capturing the light reflected in the car. And I saw her involuntarily turn him to the subject.

In the most realistic profession, she was still an artist. She always looked to both news and art. One of his recordings she took is still somewhere.

I think photographers have as opportunistic an eye as most artists. In a way, they’re all journalists, coldly waiting to be attacked by the light when it turns to magic.

More than painters and poets, they are bound to reality, but supplemented by vigilance that makes them feel animal and beautiful at the same time. I saw clouds running across the field for 30 minutes until they were right behind the tree.

Milky Way

Unrealistic, I expect all photos to act responsibly on the basis of reality. I know I can make fools of people. That kind of authority comes with responsibility, doesn’t it? And recently there are already enough banana peels.

Starry sky observation has been my hobby for a long time, but I see night sky images and digital images online that I have never seen or will never see. The Milky Way in the night sky over the illuminated city.

They are not fakes. The light is really there. The galaxy with its faintly visible dust and star channels rises above the grid of street lamps and office lights.

Your eyes don’t act like the digital camera that took them, so you can only see them in a photo. You can neither set the aperture nor adjust the ISO and shutter speed. There is no Adobe in your head.

The dark skies of our time require patience. You need to stay away from the light long enough for your eyes to be fully open. After resting in the dark for about 20 minutes in the house, you step into a landscape with no light under the clear night sky. Heaven sings you Gloria.

Many people living today have never seen it. Since our ancestors left trees in the vast Serengeti, its sights and wonders are likely the starting point for all human speculation.

Arranging the scene for modern teenagers? “That’s it? The internet is looking better. Can I have my cell phone now?”

The writer follows the words and the photographer follows the light. From the 1826 Vernier bitumen photograph (which, if it contained geese and pigs, went back and forth during exposure time to erase itself) to the digital display of the spanned galaxy of light. This inner unity is the reason why photography is an art. To us.

Artists collect light mechanically or digitally. Reality has already been cut out and bypassed. The photographer chose this time, this point, this angle and the frame of the lens. The photographer then more or less changes the collected light and turns it into an art. It wasn’t a reality before the lens clicked.

“Unscripted” is a weekly entertainment column produced by the author’s rotation team.

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Source link The photographer is an artist who collects light [Unscripted column] | entertainment

Youngsters and Cash: Because the pandemic will get worse, dad and mom prioritize speaking about cash with their youngsters [Column] | Cash

Believe me, talking to your child about money can be easy.

It mainly takes advantage of the plethora of everyday learning opportunities that occur in the serial aisles of grocery stores, sits in the TV commercial flash, searches pop-up ads online, and uses new or used cell phones. Will be bought. the mall.

But too many parents miss out on these opportunities, whether they have no faith in the subject or are not interested.

But something interesting happened during the pandemic. According to a recent study by Baltimore-based investment firm T. Rowe Price, parents have started talking more to their children about money.

In fact, T. RowePrice found that the percentage of parents who had money conversations with their children in the past year hit record levels during the pandemic process. The company launched its annual Kids & Money survey 13 years ago to examine the attitudes and behavior of parents and children towards money.

According to the latest survey of more than 2,000 parents and children between the ages of 8 and 14, 47% of parents discuss money problems with their children at least once a week during the pandemic. As of 2017, fund companies have stated that the percentage of families who regularly chat about money has never exceeded 35%. (The 2020 survey was almost complete in the early stages of the pandemic.)

What did parents and children talk about? Save money, establish the importance of not living beyond your own means, set financial goals and share how the pandemic has affected your daily cost of living. Of course, the family also provided information about the pandemic as often as they talked about their financial well-being.

Jerome Clark, Strategic Program Manager at T. Lowprice said:

The survey also found that families of all races had more money conversations with their families over the past year.

One point is to understand the clues your child is not giving their parents. The stressful situations that we have been through for over a year can be transformed into powerful teaching aids. A long-standing study by T. Rowe Price found that children who frequently talked about money to their parents became more financially responsible as they got older.

If talking about savings, expenses, goal setting, and other financial concepts isn’t your forte, there are numerous resources available online to get you started MoneyConfidentKids.com, T. A free educational resource created by RowePrice.

Parents should always be ready to ask their children about the worst things about money. Your questions can surprise you when you are least willing to answer.

When confronted with moments like this, I always say, “That’s an interesting question. Why do you ask? “It takes time to say something other than” yes “,” no “and” maybe “.

You may not have all the answers, but don’t worry. The fact that you are listening to your child’s questions may be enough to keep the conversation going.

Children and Money: As the pandemic worsens, it is very important for parents to talk to their children about money [Column] | money

Source link Children and Money: As the pandemic worsens, it is very important for parents to talk to their children about money [Column] | money

Youngsters and Cash: Teen delivers cash messages on ‘Cash Ed’ podcast [Column] | Cash

Whitman Ochiai likes to tackle tough questions as the host of Money Ed, a podcast series he created two years ago.

Some of the topics it covers include: student loan debt relief, the value of college education, resource allocation for community college education, and how behavioral economics is playing out in the aisles of supermarkets? “

All topics are relevant to the primary teenage and young adult audience in Money Ed. The same goes for Ochiai, an 18-year-old senior at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Fairfax County, northern Virginia.

Ochiai became interested in money and finance from a young age, checking books in the library and paying attention to what his parents taught him.

However, he giggles when asked if he considers himself a financial expert. “I still learn about money every day,” he said.

It appears that Ochiai’s natural curiosity and thirst for learning about financial and economic problems served him well over 45 episodes and counts. He’s one of more and more young podcasters across the country who have a following.

The teenager started his podcasting career in his sophomore year from his family dining room, which he turned into a small soundproof recording studio.

The podcasts usually last around three minutes and are free. The bi-monthly programs are available in Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Amazon Music, Spotify, and SoundCloud.

Ochiai, who is also president of his school’s financial literacy club, started Money Ed after seeing the financial impact of the federal government’s shutdown on his community. Salaries have been frozen, savings tapped, and families worried about the future.

“I was thinking, how could I contribute to a solution that would help my community,” Ochiai said. “I brainstormed with some financial professionals and decided to create a financial literacy podcast for teens and young adults.”

This has been a tough year financially for many families, and the aftermath of the pandemic keeps coming back. But Ochiai believes that his work helped make a difference by teaching fellow students how to be responsible with money during difficult times.

Money wisely can be difficult at any age, but Ochiai believes there are some concepts that every teenager should know:

  • “Understand the notion of delayed gratification and the potential harm of impulsive financial decisions,” he said. “Stand back and look at the pros and cons.”
  • Understand value versus cost. For example, weigh the cost of going to college – everything from tuition, room and board, to the time and energy it takes to perform well – versus what you get in earning power with a degree.
  • “Make a spending plan – a budget, if you will – so you always know where your money is going,” he said.

Ochiai will be attending Cornell University this fall and plans to focus on economics and data science.

When asked about his future podcasting. Ochiai didn’t hesitate and said he would keep “Money Ed” going. After all, he will have a whole new audience of young viewers who have questions about their own financial future.