Profitable, Cash Saving Summit County Psychological Well being Program Grabs Consideration Of Colorado Leaders – CBS Denver

DILLON, Colorado (CBS4) – A program in Summit County aimed at responding to those in the midst of mental crisis has caught the attention of state leaders. Earlier this month, Governor Jared Polis traveled to Dillon to speak with community leaders about what makes the Summit County model so successful.

Governor Jared Polis and other heads of state meet with community leaders in Summit County. (Credit: CBS)

“First and foremost, we’re building it up from the community, not the law enforcement down, which is really important,” said Jaime FitzSimons, Summit County sheriff.

The SMART program, or System-wide Mental Assessment Response, was launched in Summit County just last year, and FitzSimons said it was an idea put forward by the community and tailored to the needs of the Summit County community. That is what makes it unique, but also what makes it work.

“There’s a lot of community support with this team. The other thing is that it’s a plainclothes answer, which means they don’t show up in uniform. They show up as a team and they show up in plain clothes, an unmarked car, and they go to all the cities here in the Summit County jurisdictions, so it’s a nationwide response, ”he said.

The response always includes a deputy paired with a clinician. This is the co-response part of the program, but it goes beyond that initial contact.

“You have a third component in your team, the case manager, so I always describe it as a deputy and clinician in times of crisis. You have the focus in the moment of crisis and stabilization – and stabilize this person in the community. At the back end is the case manager who comes now and provides the all-round service for further stabilization, ”said FitzSimons.

(Credit: CBS)

Over the past 10 months, the joint response has saved hundreds of people from landing in the emergency room, saved the emergency room from overflowing, and saved the county money. FitzSimons and his team estimate that for every person they can help avoid a trip to the emergency room, the county will save about $ 15,000.

“This year it was just over $ 2 million for the first 10 months of this year. It’s a huge number, but more importantly, how many people we’ve stabilized rather than sending people to higher levels of care or destroying our emergency room. We have stabilized an incredible number of people, what we say ‘on the spot’, be it at home, wherever that place is, but not going to a higher level of care, that has crushed the community. “

FitzSimons believes any ward can accept the program and make it successful, but what works in Summit County will likely be different for Denver. In Summit County, the start-up cost of the program is around $ 425,000, and while it was a successful program, funding has been one of the biggest hurdles.

Colorado ranks No. 10 in most cash misplaced in U.S. attributable to cyberattacks

STATEWIDE – The state of Colorado ranks 10th on the list of the US states that have lost the most money to cyberattacks. The average financial loss is approximately $ 8,167 per person.

Over the past decade, the number of cyber attacks has grown significantly, increasing 765% from $ 485 million in 2011 to a record loss of $ 4.2 billion in 2020.

CCTV camera world on Wednesday, August 25th, published a study on the The Most Expensive Cybercrime in America after analyzing the data from the FBI Internet Crime Compliant Center IC3 from 2021 to 2011.

Colorado business owners were severely attacked, losing an average of $ 97,964 to business email compromising – the highest cost cyberattack. BEC targets business emails by acting as a real seller of a company and sharing new banking information to get at fraudulent transfers.

Phishing is the most common method of fraudulent theft in which scammers send emails or texts with links that can access your data and other important information. This technique has grown 1,100% in the past five years and is the most widely used method.

North Dakota, Missouri, Ohio, New York, and Utah were the five states that lost the most money in 2020.

How do you avoid cyber attacks? See the list below.

  • Never reply to unsolicited communications via email, text message, or phone.
  • Don’t click links, give out personal information, or send money unless you know them.
  • Use a password manager to diversify your passwords.
  • Limit the amount of personal information you post on social media.

If you fall victim to a cyber attack, report it to the IC3, FBI or IdentityTheft.gov.

First responder hockey match raises cash for households of fallen Colorado officers

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FORT COLLINS, Colorado (KRDO) – The Colorado Springs Police Department participated in a statewide charity hockey tournament that raised money for the families of fallen law enforcement officers.

Over the weekend, Blue Warriors Hockey teamed up with the Fort Collins Pond Hockey League to host the Fallen Heroes Memorial Tournament.

According to Blue Warriors, the tournament raised money for local heroes who died on duty. All players are first responders from government agencies across the state.

This year the tournament raised money for the families of Boulder Officer Eric Talley and Arvada Officer Gordon Beesley.

Talley was one of ten victims of the King Soopers mass shooting in Boulder. Beesley was shot dead in Olde Town Arvada in June.

The hockey tournament raised about $ 30,000.

Learn more about it Blue Warriors Hockey, click here.

Absolutely Colorado / Colorado Springs / Local News / State and Regional News / Video / VOSOTs

Feds will ration water from Colorado River amid historic drought

The US government on Monday declared the first water shortage in Lake Mead, the largest reservoir in the country by volume, after the water level fell to a record low amid a decades-long drought.

The water cuts will go into effect for Arizona, Nevada and Mexico in January, the Bureau of Reclamation said on Monday. Arizona will be hardest hit, with roughly 18% of the state’s annual allotment cut.

The Colorado River provides water and electricity to more than 40 million people in the west, while also providing approximately 2.5 million acres of farmland. Among the cities it serves is Phoenix, which according to the US newspaper has been the fastest growing city in the US for the past decade Arizona Republic, and is now the fifth largest city in the country.

Earlier this summer, reservoirs in the Colorado River Basin fell to their lowest level on record after 22 consecutive years of drought. In just five years, Lake Mead and Lake Powell have lost 50% of their capacity.

Officials believe Lake Mead’s water level is just below 1,066 feet on Jan. 1, which is about nine feet below the trigger level of 1,075 feet.

At a press conference following the announcement, officials said “additional action is likely to be required in the near future” as the situation worsens. More than 98% of the western US is currently in drought, 64% in extreme drought conditions.

“We are seeing the effects of climate change in the Colorado River Basin through prolonged drought, temperature extremes, widespread forest fires, and in some places floods and landslides, and now it is time to take action to respond,” said Tanya Trujillo. Deputy Secretary for Water and Science in the Ministry of the Interior.

Lake Mead was created through the construction of the Hoover Dam and extends over more than 750 miles of coastline.

Colorado’s portion of infrastructure cash nears $5 billion | Western Colorado

Colorado would see nearly $ 5 billion from President Joe Biden’s infrastructure measure, which is now being debated in the US Senate, the White House said on Wednesday.

Under the $ 1 trillion infrastructural investment and jobs bill, which is initially supported by both parties in the Senate, Colorado’s stake would be used for highways, bridges, public transportation, electric vehicle charging stations, and high-speed broadband, according to a breakdown Money from White House officials.

These are exactly the same things that Governor Jared Polis asked Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg to include in any federal infrastructure bill in July.

“For decades, the infrastructure in Colorado has suffered from a systemic lack of investment,” said a White House statement. “In fact, the American Society of Civil Engineers gave Colorado a C rating on their infrastructure certificate.”

The money the state is expected to receive if the bill in its current form passes all of Congress would be almost the same amount the state expects from a new transportation finance measure approved by the Colorado Legislature earlier this year, and this would be the case in less than half the time.

This new law, SB260, would raise $ 5.7 billion over 11 years by introducing new charges on gasoline, electric vehicles, and delivery services, to name a few.

Most of the federal infrastructure money in Colorado, $ 3.7 billion over five years, would go to highways across the state and another $ 225 million to the bridges.

Another $ 917 million could go to the state for public transportation projects, also over five years, and $ 57 million would be used for EV charging stations. The state could also compete for more grant funds for more broadcasters.

Ultimately, the infrastructure measure would allocate $ 100 million to expand the broadband network, especially for those who do not have it or have inferior service. It would also give low-income Coloradans access to scholarship programs to pay monthly internet access fees.

The White House added that more details on what the state will receive will be revealed in the coming weeks.

Cash & the Regulation: Colorado has had its share of conservatorship dramas | Enterprise

With the Britney Spears melodrama for inspiration, I thought I’d tell you a few things about conservatories.

Establishing a conservatory begins with filing an application with a probate court asking the court to put someone – a so-called “restorer” – in charge of the financial affairs of the person whose abilities allegedly fail, which are considered “protected.” Person ”. Before the motion can be upheld, the court (in Colorado at least) must be presented with clear and convincing evidence that the protected person “is unable to manage property and business because the person is unable to obtain information effectively maintain or evaluate or both or make decisions or communicate. … “

The protected person must be informed about the procedure and is entitled to a lawyer. The court may also appoint a person known as a “visitor” to conduct an investigation aimed at providing the court with an objective analysis of the need for a restorer.

The conservator, when appointed, assumes the position of trustee, which means that the protected person is owed the duty of the greatest loyalty and honesty. The court issues the conservator with an official (and official-looking) document that can be used by the conservator to take over the protected person’s assets and liabilities. The court may adapt the curator’s powers to the particular circumstances of the case.

Once a conservator has been appointed, the protected person is deprived of the power to conduct his or her own financial affairs. The law also protects against liability people who deal with the protected person in good faith and without knowledge of the existence of a restoration. So a protected person can still wreak havoc if not carefully watched.

The motivation for a conservatory sometimes comes from children who fear that a parent in decline will squander family wealth before it can be passed on as inheritance. This is not a fair reason for a restoration. Rather, the purpose should be to preserve assets in the “best interests” of the protected person. Preservation of wealth in the interests of the protected person can (incidentally) also have the effect of preserving wealth for an inheritance if the protected person dies.

Colorado has its share of conservatory melodramas. In a recent case, a man named Bernard Black – a full law professor at Northwestern University School of Law – was found to have violated a duty of loyalty to his sister, the protected person, as a conservator. This break involved a diversion of assets from a trust set up by the late mother to meet her daughter’s needs to a trust in which her son, the conservator’s children, had an interest. This dispute over control of the late mother’s property found its way in eight courts in three states (meaning much of the mother’s property has now been consumed by the legal profession).

In another case that went before the Colorado Court of Appeals, Matthew Keenan, a protected individual, attempted to dismiss a bank that was acting as its curator. The bank struggled, and the dispute merged into a dispute for $ 200,000 plus legal fees and costs claimed by the bank.

Jim Flynn can be reached at moneylaw@jtflynn.com.

Piolis to Buttigieg: More cash for Western Slope, please | Western Colorado

Governor Jared Polis asks Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg to keep an eye on Colorado’s Western Slope as his federal agency considers funding new infrastructure projects.

In a letter Monday to Buttigieg, the former mayor and former presidential candidate of South Bend, Indiana, Polis said the Western Slope’s transportation needs are critical not just to Colorado’s economy but to the west as a whole.

“The Western Slope is the backbone of rural and urban communities along Interstate 70, the state’s only contiguous east-west route and gateway to Colorado’s thriving outdoor recreation industry,” Polis wrote. “High housing costs in our popular tourist destinations often push residents to the outskirts or surrounding rural areas, increasing the need for accessible and affordable mobility options.”

Polis told Buttigieg that the Colorado Department of Transportation worked with several Colorado communities, including Grand Junction, to build mobility hubs that will help connect people with all types of transportation, including buses and trains.

He also cited similar efforts at Rifle and Glenwood Springs.

“The improvements to the Grand Junction Mobility Corridor, the Glenwood Springs multi-model major road project, and the expansion and relocation of Rifle Park-n-Ride promote a regional approach to travel along the I-70 corridor in western Colorado,” Polis wrote.

The US Department of Transportation is currently reviewing more than $ 1 billion in grant applications nationwide to fund such projects under a federal grant program.

This program, now known as Rebuilding American Infrastructure with Sustainability and Equity, has raised nearly $ 9 million since 2009.

“Colorado’s Revitalizing Main Streets program has strengthened a strong partnership between the state and cities and towns focused on strengthening inner cities and the quality of the place,” said Shoshana Lew, CDOT executive director. “This grant application builds on that partnership.”

Colorado Springs fireworks: The right way to watch, what to know | Arts & Leisure

Fireworks will be launched on your porch tonight from multiple locations in the Pikes Peak area for the July 4th Symphony. The event returns this year in place of the fireworks in Memorial Park. Here’s what you should know.

Where can I see fireworks tonight?

People are encouraged to see the displays from their homes. Fireworks are set off in the following locations:

  • The Broadmoor
  • Cherokee Ridge Golf Course
  • The club at Flying Horse
  • The Colorado Country Club at Cheyenne Mountain Resort
  • Falcon Freedom Days at Meridian Ranch
  • Garden of the Gods Resort and Club
  • Patty Jewett Golf Course.



Karte_4th-of-Juli_FINAL-1.jpeg

Fireworks are also hosted by Colorado Springs Switchbacks FC and Rocky Mountain Vibes via tickets with admission tickets.

You can also watch the show live on KKTV.com or on the KKTV Facebook page.

When do the fireworks start tonight?

The show starts at 9:20 pm

How do I listen to the Colorado Springs Philharmonic?

Switch on one of the following channels for the live broadcast from 9 p.m.

Sunny 106.3 FM; Y96.9 FM ; KCME 88.7 FM; AM 740 KVOR; 92.9 FM peak

Colorado Springs will get one other style of Jamaica | Desk Discuss | Arts & Leisure

Everton Cameron, owner of High Grade Foods, has been running his hugely successful food truck since 2013 when there were only a few mobile food companies roaming around town. On May 28th, he opened a restaurant with seating at 1020 S. Tejon St., but not without major delays.

“Yeah, it took about three and a half years,” he said. “There were construction delays and then the pandemic.”

The good news is that it is open and serves some of the tastiest Jamaican dishes we’ve been immersed in for a while. Cameron’s culinary talent, honed in upscale Jamaican hotels and resorts, shines in his new restaurant. For example, the Jamaican beef patty with coconut bread ($ 8) that we enjoyed for lunch. This tasty Jamaican staple is made from ground beef flavored with curry powder and chillies. Cameron covers the patty with a puff pastry before deep-frying it. Then he folds the patty into his handmade, deliciously soft coconut bread.

Next up, we have the Jerk Barbecue Pork Ribs ($ 15) with Baked Mac and Cheese ($ 7) and Sub Shrimp Curry with Coconut Rice ($ 18) for the braised oxtails we ordered.

Colorado Springs with new restaurants on Pikes Peak

While the oxtails got stuck in the kitchen, we were more than happy with the piping hot food that came on our table. The ribs were juicy and tender with a perfectly flavorful jerk seasoning and sticky barbecue sauce. The baked mac and cheese alone is worth visiting again. The curry prawns were spot on too. The coconut rice was wonderfully soaked in the spicy curry sauce.

Lunch prices are reasonable for the large portions (we brought to-go boxes). We were told that the dinner prices are a little higher but the portions are bigger. There’s a full bar with nods to Jamaican rums and of course Red Line beer is on offer.

“I’m looking for a bartender who can make fun cocktails,” says Cameron. “I will also add other dishes to the menu.”

The opening times are Wednesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Details: 930-3843, facebook.com/HighGradeFoods.



Colorado Springs gets a different taste from Jamaica

Stunning new mural at Crave Real Burgers.


Refreshes desire

Crave Real Burgers, 7465 N. Academy Blvd., was closed for a few days in January to complete a remodeling project. When it reopened, guests were greeted with a new vibrant mural, bright orange furniture, a row of tall communal tables, and an updated menu.

“Given the closure, we decided to take some time to update the Colorado Springs store,” said Jeff Richard, head chef and owner. “I’m really excited about the mural and the new arrangement of the furniture gives us more seating.”

The long-awaited, redesigned Colorado Springs restaurant is about to open

New menu items included the pound beef Texas burger with a smoked brisket, coleslaw, jalapeño bottle caps (fried pepper slices), and homemade barbecue sauce. “It’s very popular and we bring it back from time to time,” he said. “And we’ve added Drunken Apple Pie Shake to the menu. It’s an ice shake with caramel, apple pie and bourbon. “

The opening times are Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Details: 264-7919, tinyurl.com/wc99fj7k



Colorado Springs gets a different taste from Jamaica

Dan MacDonald, owner of Colorado BBQ Outfitters, hosts the new radio show Easy Does it BBQ.


New radio broadcast

Grill fans, this show is for you: Easy Does It BBQ.

The 30-minute radio show is hosted by Dan MacDonald, owner of Colorado BBQ Outfitters, 5921 N. Academy Blvd., and airs Saturdays on KPPF 1040 AM, 95.7 FM and 98.5 FM at 1:00 PM. Find previous shows on the YouTube channel.

Colorado Springs gets new Detroit-style pizzeria

Drinking wine in the park

The Manitou Springs Colorado Wine Festival at Memorial Park, Manitou Ave. 502, takes place daily in two sessions: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on August 28 and 29. Prepaid general admission is $ 35. Free for designated drivers. Live music, food trucks and gift items. visit tinyurl.com/yjwwh5us.

Contact the author: 636-0271.

Contact the author: 636-0271.

Colorado Springs space leisure occasions beginning July 1 | Arts & Leisure

THURSDAY

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Dave Day and Route 61, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/ paintthetownblue.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Hickabee, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

The Brad Eastin Quintet — 7 p.m., The Gold Room, 18 S. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: 634-4653, goldroomlive.com.

Super Clang — With The Short T.E.R.M, The Flower Gospel, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Habitual Offenders with Tracy Kellett — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

The Bellamy Brothers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$99. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

FRIDAY

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 101st Army Band, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Kailani Dobson — 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m., GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100; gocadigital.org.

Snake and the Rabbit — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theareworks, 6 p.m., 112 E. Boulder St.; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Tovenaar — With Upon a Fields Whisper, Clarion Void, Kalakuta, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Figure — With Jeanie, Dub, Underground Sounds, 7 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25-$35. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Nico Coluucci — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Derrick Stroup — 7 and 9:30 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$65. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

Jozalyn Sharp — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 30

”Equilibrium” — Works by Shannon Mello, opens 5-9 p.m. Friday, G44 Gallery, 121 E. Boulder St. Exhibit runs noon-5 p.m. Thursdays- Saturdays; g44gallery.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 31

”What We Did” — Opens 5-8 p.m. Friday, Cottonwood Center for the Arts, 427 E. Colorado Ave. Exhibit runs through July 31; cottonwoodcenterforthearts.com.

”Cheers! Drink Up! 2021” — Featuring drinkware made from clay, Commonwheel Artists Co-op, 102 Canon Ave., Manitou Springs; commonwheel.com/cheers-2021.

”Nature of Summer” — Works by Wendy Iaconis, Suzy Gardner and Kang Lee Sheppard, Arati Artists Gallery, 2425 W. Colorado Ave.; aratiartistsgallery.com.

JULY 2-AUG. 8

”Morning, Noon and Night in Garden of the Gods” — Laura Reilly Fine Art Gallery and Studio, 2522-A W. Colorado Ave.; 650-1427.

SATURDAY

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10 10:45 and 11:30 a.m., Hillside Community Center, 925 S. Institute St. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a– venue-2021.

Brut Fest — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $10. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Fighting the Phoenix — With The Endless Line, Arctic Origins, Lava Gato, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Dueling Pianos — 7 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$35. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

Boyd Sweeney — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

SUNDAY

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Soul School, 7-9:30 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

TUESDAY

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: String Orchestra — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradosprings philmusicians.com.

Idaho with Mute Forest — 8 p.m., Lulu’s Downstairs, 107 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs, $10. Tickets required: 424-7637, lulusdownstairs.com.

WEDNESDAY

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With Mississippi Mudders, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With The Mississippi Mudders, 6-8 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; 592-9541.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With John Wise and Tribe, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

WEDNESDAY-JULY 8

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Rico Southee, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 8

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Take 2 Blues and the Soulcasters, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

”Colorado Springs Then and Now” Photo Exhibit Opening Reception — 5:30-8:30 p.m., Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive; 260-6637.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Triple Nickel, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

Trapt — With Acedon Franklin, Mindless Vitality, Matthew Hennis, The R Souls, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $20. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Wheel of Doom with John Rumery — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

JULY 9

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 17th Avenue Allstars, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Leo and the Lark — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

Reminiscent Souls — With Suga Bear, 7 p.m., Stargazers Theatre, 10 S. Parkside Drive, $10. Tickets required: stargazerstheatre.com.

Sheep Sessions: He$h & More — 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $25. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Jazz in the Garden Concert Series — With Wayne Wilkinson Trio, 7 p.m., Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 601 N. Tejon St.; gssepiscopal.org.

Mike Van Arsdale — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 9-10

Jay Hollingsworth — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Steve Sabo — 7:30 and 9:45 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$55. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

SofaKillers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$40. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 9-18

Jurassic Quest Drive Thru — The Broadmoor World Arena, 3185 Venetucci Blvd., starting at $49 per vehicle. Tickets required: 477-2100, worldarena.com.

JULY 9-AUG. 28

”An American Night’s Dream” — Presented by Campfire Theater, 6:30 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 205 W. Fontanero St. Audience will be let on hiking trails as part of the show, $20. Tickets required: campfiretheatertours.com.

JULY 10

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10, 10:44 and 11:30 a.m., Meadows Park, 1943 S. El Paso Ave. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theatreworks, 2 p.m., George Fellows Park, 5711 Tuckerman Drive; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Chris Webby — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25 and up. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

E.P.I.C. Concert and Film in the Park — 7 p.m., Acacia Park Bandshell, 115 E. Platte Ave., 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

SemiFiction — With Stereo Ontario, The Sum Beaches, Emerson Bailey, Grimmly, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Rhythm and the Rose — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 10-11

Life of Bach: A Musical Journey — With Colorado Springs’ Early Music Ensemble, Parish House Baroque, 7-8 p.m. July 10, 2:30-4 p.m. July 11, First Lutheran Church, 1515 N. Cascade Ave, $10-$20. Tickets required: parishhouse baroque.org.

JULY 11

Hickabee & Brandon Henderson Band — 6 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $10-$15. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

In the Whale — With Salt of Sanguine, Redbush, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $15. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

JULY 12

Gemini Syndrome — With A Killers Confession, Ovtlier, Pushing Veronica, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $15. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshine studioslive.com.

Summer Concert Series — By Friends of Monument Park with New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 7 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 170 W. Cache La Poudre St.; fmvp.net.

JULY 13

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: Brass Band — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradospringsphilmusicians.com.

JULY 14

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With The Mitguards, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 6-8 p.m., Bear Creek Regional Park, 21st Street and Argus Boulevard; 592-9541.

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Professor M, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With Playing with Smoke, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

JULY 15

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Eef and the Blues Express, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Collective Groove, 6-8 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

Black Forest Summer Jazz Series — With New Horizons “Kick” Band, 6:30-8 p.m., Black Forest Community Club, 12530 Black Forest Road, Black Forest; bfcommunityclub.org.

Front Range Big Band — 7-8 p.m., Soda Springs Park, 1016 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs; 494-3746.

You Look Like with Jonny & Brian — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Little Texas — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$55. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 15-17

Jeremy Piven — 7 p.m. July 15, 7 and 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $35-$90. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

JULY 15-18

”Paranormal Cirque” — 7:30 p.m. July 15-16, 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 6:30 p.m. 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. July 18, The Citadel Mall, 750 Citadel Drive East, $10-$50. Tickets required: tinyurl.com/ 2y7m3vbs.

JULY 15-AUG. 1

”Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill” — Shockley-Zalabak Theater, 5225 N. Nevada Ave., $15 and up. Tickets required: 255-3232, entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH JULY 24

”The Space(s) Between” Exhibit — GOCA Ent Center for the Arts, 5225 N. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 6

”U OK?” Exhibit — GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 7

Papel Chicano Dos: Works on Paper from the Collection of Cheech Marin — 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH AUG. 21

”To Bind or to Burn” — Works by Anna Tsouhlarakis, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH SEPT. 2

Sack Lunch Serenade Shows — Free silent films accompanied by the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ, noon-1 p.m. Thursdays, Immanuel Organ Gym, 828 E. Pikes Peak Ave., $6 lunches available; 473-2010.

THROUGH SEPT. 4

Eugène Atget: “Photographing Paris, 1898-1925” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/exhibits/eugene– atget-photographing-paris.

”Ansel Adams: Masterworks” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/ exhibits/ansel-adams-masterworks.

THROUGH OCT. 2

”Honesty Always Wins … or … This Mine is Mine” — Melodrama dinner theater, The Iron Springs Chateau, 444 Ruxton Ave., Manitou Springs. Go online for costs. Reservations required: ironspringschateau.com.

COMPILED BY CARLOTTA OLSON, THE GAZETTE, 636-0221, CARLOTTA.OLSON@GAZETTE.COM