Kyler Murray has Arizona Cardinals O-line taking part in golf in fashion with {custom} golf equipment, luggage

While the Arizona Cardinals are hoping to have the shortest off-season of any NFL team with the Super Bowl, the team still has plenty of time to work on their golf game before training camp.

And Cardinals quarterback Kyler Murray ensures his offensive line hits the links in style.

For Christmas, Murray bought each member of the Cardinals O-Line custom made white leather golf bags and a set of custom-fit clubs from True Spec Golf. The pockets are each printed with the names and numbers of the players in Cardinals red on the front. Videos posted on social media posts show the players swinging and putt in a simulator as they conform.

It seems that some of the players may need to work on their game. And although the Cardnials are currently at the top of NFC West and, according to the FPI, have a 99% chance of reaching the playoffs if they continue playing as they did last week against the Detriot Lions with two wins and one 30:12 loss, the O-line will bring their new devices to market sooner rather than later.

Do warehouse golf equipment like Costco prevent cash in the long term?

This is just one of the stories in our “I’ve Always Wondered” series, in which we address all of your questions about the business world, no matter how big or small. Have you ever wondered if recycling is? It is worth it? Or how to store brands stack against Name brands? Check out more from the series here.

Listener Anne Prianti from Alpharetta, Georgia asked:

Do warehouse clubs (e.g. Costco, Sam’s, BJ’s) cost more than you save? I run a high school kitchen and when my monthly inventory is high (dollar terms) it has a negative impact on my finances. Wouldn’t buying and storing bulk items also have a negative impact on my household finances?

When Sarah Boling raised five children as a single mother, she recalls being unable to buy household goods in bulk because she didn’t have enough cash on hand.

That meant buying a four-pack of toilet paper for a few dollars, for example, compared to a 16-pack, which cost more but would last a lot longer.

“With all of these kids, you know, toilet paper, paper towels – it all goes through pretty quickly,” said Boling, who lives in Inverness, Florida. “So it would have helped if I could have bought large quantities.”

Now that she has a more stable salary and is married, she can shop in bulk at Sam’s Club, purchase household cleaning items and paper products, and long-life groceries such as condiments, in a two-income household at Sam’s Club. She said she saves hundreds every year.

Boling’s previous experience is reflected the “poverty penalty” – a phenomenon where low-income consumers actually pay more than rich people.

Low-income households typically buy smaller packages from cheaper brands. This undermines their efforts to save money as the unit price is loudly higher than that of items sold in bulk a 2016 working paper by Professor Yesim Orhun at the University of Michigan and Mike Palazzolo, a Ph.D. Student at that time.

Their data showed that low-income households, for example, pay 5.5% more per roll when buying toilet paper than if they had done their shopping like high-income households. These households buy in bulk and use sales more often. Not only do these less affluent households lack upfront cash, but they also don’t have the space to store extra items, so they can’t wait for the products to go on sale.

The study also showed they take advantage of volume discounts and sales when they have more liquidity.

“I was definitely aware that I was basically spending more money than I should have spent,” said Boling. “I’ve been pretty poor for most of my life, and I’ve been a single mother for a long time. So basically you have to get what is cheapest. “

Nicole Dow, Senior Writer at The penny hoarder who focuses on savings and budgeting strategies, said warehouse club shoppers can usually see price breakdowns that help them make smarter decisions.

“If you look in the store, you will find that the store actually gives the price per unit,” said Dow. “And you can use that for comparison. Because there are times when you find that the item you normally buy is better to buy as a stand-alone item rather than a bulk item. “

She also noted that while bulk foods tend to have a lower price per unit, you need to make sure you can consume them before the expiration date.

Borrowing from this point, Kara Grant, assistant professor of economics at Missouri Western State University, pointed out that the size of your family has an impact on how beneficial these businesses are in the long run. For example, buying items like fresh produce in bulk may not be the best option for smaller households.

For non-perishable items, Dow suggested sharing the cost with a roommate or friend.

Shopping at warehouse clubs like Costco, Sam’s, and BJ’s also require a membership fee between $ 55 and $ 120 per year depending on which tier you buy. However, Boling pointed out that warehouse club membership is another thing that low-income consumers typically can’t afford to buy in advance.

One tip from Dow is to find someone who has a membership, such as a neighbor, who can pick up an item for you. You could then refund them for this purchase.

“If you only shop once a month, or if you don’t really take advantage of that purchase, these stores may not be good business for you to shop for,” said Dow. “But you can still buy in bulk from your everyday grocery stores.”

Nancy Wong, a professor of consumer science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, said she stopped shopping at Costco because she felt like she was losing money.

“I remember buying things like guacamole,” she said with a laugh. “I realized I could only dent the crowd. I threw the rest away in the end. ”

There are easily taken for granted lifestyle features that come with being able to shop in stores like this. For example, you need a car and a house with storage space to house these items, Wong said.

Costco is “clearly targeting a specific market segment,” she explained.

The typical Costco shopper is a 39 year old Asian American who earns more than $ 125,000 a year, according to data from the analysis company Numerator, which were made available to insiders. The big box retail chain draws a richer clientele than stores like Walmart – hence theirs luxurious offers.

Orhun of the University of Michigan said retailers could provide low-interest lines of credit or manufacturers could run promotions to cut the costs associated with the inability to purchase in bulk.

“There are ways to save money when you have money,” noted Boling. “And you can’t do that if you don’t have any money.”

New theater, golf equipment spotlight Resorts World’s leisure choices

Ask Bobby Reynolds if he’s slept a lot lately.

“Eh, no.”

The senior vice president of AEG Presents Las Vegas was in the driver’s seat as the local concert industry sped from idle to idle at a COVID-19 stop sign to brick-on-the-gas pedal speeds.

Not only is Reynolds directing the new theater at the Virgin Hotels and the first concert at Allegiant Stadium when EDM star Illenium christened the venue next month, he is also leading one of his most ambitious projects to date: the opening of the luxurious The Theater at Resorts World.

“Since I’ve been in town, and it’s been 16 years, nothing like this has opened up – or really nowhere else in the world,” says Reynolds, his lively voice revealing, despite the aforementioned lack of nightly “The level of sophistication,” that Level of class – it’s just a higher experience than anything else. It’s a more luxurious feel than anything else on the strip. It’s easy.”

The 4,700-seat venue – with a potential capacity of 5,000 – shines with mostly gold and silver-colored décor that deserves a walk-in jewelry box, and aims to set a new bar for concert generosity. A four-story lobby, which is illuminated by a large modern chandelier, opens into the main hall with two balcony levels, where no seat is more than 50 meters away from the stage.

While The Theater won’t open until later in the year, four residencies have been announced, including country superstars Carrie Underwood and Luke Bryan, popster Katy Perry, and one of Vegas’ most popular artists of all time, Celine Dion.

What was Reynolds looking for when booking resident acts?

“We were looking for what we got, honestly,” he says. “We don’t just want to identify a genre, but also recruit artists who have a legacy in Las Vegas. There is no one with a greater, richer, or more impressive legacy than Celine.

“And then we wanted to get artists who didn’t have a legacy in Las Vegas and build that legacy with them in Las Vegas,” he continues. “All three other artists fall into this category.”

When said artists perform at The Theater, they perform on a 13,550-square-foot stage, one of the largest and tallest on the Strip.

“We’ll be able to do major arena-sized productions,” says Reynolds. “The nice thing about these residences is that you load them once and unload them once. During this time you will receive X shows. We have the ability to keep all those massive, massive, massive shows going and amortizing those costs over a certain number of shows.

“We also have one of the largest stage lifts in the world,” he adds, “with this we have the option of assembling set pieces, placing them directly on the lift at stage level and bringing them up or down.” Two stories. So if we wanted to bring a late night comedian or get creative at a corporate event or something like that, we could mix the pieces. We don’t just have to take these set pieces apart. “

The video presentation of the theater should be just as flexible.

“The video isn’t just a huge screen,” explains Reynolds. “We can put many different screens together into one giant screen, or split this screen and move it into different pods to have different looks throughout the show or different looks at the same time during the show.”

When Reynolds tells it, it all boils down to “wow”.

“In fact, I think it’s the most technologically advanced and production-wise advanced venue in the world,” says Reynolds. “People will walk in there and be overwhelmed by the aesthetics and the first look you get when you see something.

“The ‘wow’ factor will not only exist through the property,” he adds, “but if you cross the line from the property to the theater, that ‘wow’ factor will only increase in my opinion.”

From A to Z: New night club and day club bring big names to Resorts World

He was used to arranging meetings.

He just wasn’t used to one of those.

Ronn Nicolli explains.

“In my previous life, a design meeting started in a room and everyone was looking at Pinterest boards and things they were printing out,” said Nicolli, a longtime Vegas nightlife executive who spent over 13 years at the Wynn Las Vegas .

And then he was hired as vice president of Zouk Group Las Vegas, which oversees Resorts World’s nightlife.

“My first day at the company began with a trip to Bali,” recalls Nicolli of a work trip that was supposed to catalyze ideas for the Resorts World day club. “On this trip, the design was based on what inspires you. One of the most prominent words was “authenticity”.

“How do we bring a Balinese-inspired paradise to Las Vegas Boulevard, a place that feels transformed when you step into it?” He continues. “Basically a second trip on a trip, a destination and a trip.”

The result: Ayu Dayclub, whose Southeast Asian island theme should be exotic and inviting at the same time.

Well-known DJ producers such as Tiesto and Zedd will set Ayu to music, who also offer nightly shows.

Later that summer, Ayu’s counterpart, the “Boutique Megaclub” Zouk, will open.

The 26,000-square-foot, multi-room nightclub will be positioned on a free-running musical aesthetic, and its residents will include hip-hop (G-Eazy), country (Dee Jay Silver), Latin (Becky G), and deep house (Disclosure). along with the required EDM stars.

“There are different genres, demographics, and audiences that want different experiences night after night,” notes Nicolli, who is also Vice President of Lifestyle Marketing at Resorts World. “Suddenly the Latin artists came into play and the hip-hop artists came into play and the deep house artists came into play. When you looked at it all on a whiteboard, it felt more like a crazy, haunted festival than a Las Vegas nightclub. “

The emphasis on diversification depends not only on genre, but also on gender.

“There are a lot of talented female artists out there and many of them had never played in Vegas before,” says Nicolli. “Peggy Gou is one that I got to see first hand during my trip to Bali. How do I get you to do a residency with us?

“It was meaningful because it was something else,” he continues. “She hadn’t played a show in Vegas before. One of the personal goals in trying to create this really well-curated line-up is to get those pieces that are very different from the competition. “

Although the Zouk brand is new to Vegas, the company has a remarkable 30 year history in Asia.

This became an advantage in recruiting artists.

“My knowledge base of how much the talent industry knew about Zouk was a cause for concern,” Nicollia admits. “Suddenly I started talking on the phone. Tiesto says, ‘Oh, my first show in Asia was in Zouk.’ This became very common in discussions with the management teams. Not only did they know Zouk, they also knew the high standards and notoriety Zoul had in the market. It was credible almost immediately. “

Now is the time to put that credibility to the test here.

The plan?

So that one club feels like several.

“Think about the opportunity to be at the Zouk club on a Friday night performing G-Eazy, and the visuals make you feel like you are in something different and new,” says Nicolli. “And then, on Saturday, Tiesto suddenly appears – different visuals, different music styles, different performance styles.

“In the same room, we have the opportunity to convey two different experiences that make you feel like you are in two different places,” he continues. “That was the goal.”

For more coverage on Resorts World, visit lvrj.com/resortsworld.

Contact Jason Bracelin at jbracelin@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0476. consequences @JasonBracelin on Twitter and @ jbracelin76 on Instagram