Dr. Fauci says Covid instances are beginning to climb in some areas of the U.S.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, testifies during the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions hearing entitled Next Steps: The Road Ahead for the COVID-19 Response in the Dirksen building on Thursday, November 4, 2021.

Tom Williams | CQ Roll Call, Inc. | Getty Images

Covid-19 cases are starting to rise again in select regions in the US after stabilizing at high levels after the delta surge this summer, said Dr. White House chief physician Anthony Fauci on Monday.

Fauci’s comments came just one day after the country reported a seven-day average of more than 82,000 new cases, 11% more than the week before, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University. Nationwide cases fell 57% last week from the peak of the Delta Wave this summer, but an influx of Covid patients in the Midwest and Northeast is driving the sudden surge.

“The only thing that is a little worrying is that we are starting to plateau,” Fauci said during an interview hosted by the bipartisan Policy Center. “In other words, the slowdown in the falls has now stabilized and we are seeing a slight upward trend in some areas of the country.”

Infections have been on the decline for weeks after hitting a delta wave high of 172,500 new cases per day on Sept. 13 last week and are now on the rise again.

According to Hopkins data, the average daily cases in the Midwest and Northeast rose 19% and 37%, respectively, over the past week. Hospital stays that lag behind a spike in infections have increased 11% in the Midwest over the same period, while the number of patients currently hospitalized with Covid is unchanged in the Northeast.

Cases and hospital admissions have fallen sharply in the south, where the delta wave hit the earliest and strongest in summer.

There are currently around 47,000 hospitalized patients with the virus nationwide, according to a seven-day average of health department data, and the US reports an average of around 1,150 Covid deaths per day, according to Hopkins data. Both numbers are flat for the past week.

Kalamazoo physician to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro to boost consciousness, cash for funding youngsters’s training

KALAMAZOO, Michigan – A West Michigan doctor and family climb mountains to raise funds for two nonprofits that focus on promoting education.

In just over two weeks, Kalamazoo doctor Ash Goel and three of his family members will be traveling to Tanzania to climb one of the highest mountains in the world.

During the climb, the group hopes to raise funds to advance education in both the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek regions and Tanzania.

“We want to climb the highest free-standing mountain in the world. It’s Kilimanjaro, ”said Dr. Ash Goel, United Way Board Member for the Kalamazoo & Battle Creek Area.

Mount Kilamanjaro in Tanzania is 6,340 feet high, and Dr. Goel said he started planning the climb over two years ago.

“The pandemic happened. It should be last year, but this year when I turned 50 I hope to do exactly what I thought of two years ago, but then I wanted it to be.” more about others than about me, “said Dr. Goel.

As a board member of the United Way of the Kalamazoo and Battle Creek Area, he also wanted to use the rise to raise money and awareness for his organization together with another group called Focus on Tanzanian Communities.

“In Tanzania there are girls’ schools that do not even have the basic equipment, and in our region there are several families whose children have not been able to go to school in recent years or have no computer or access to the Internet, or sometimes even access to food, “said Dr. Goel.

“Our educational focus is really on kindergarten readiness, quality childcare, third-grade reading skills to ultimately support better graduation rates for high school students in our county and region,” said United Way of the Kalamazoo & Battle Creek Area VP for Effect and commitment Alyssa Stewart.

In addition to Dr. Goel will be his 16 year old daughter, 22 year old niece and 25 year old nephew.

The group is expected to depart on August 15 and begin the climb in the evening of August 17 or the morning of August 18.

“It’s going to be about 128 miles from base because we’re going to have to make a winding trip to the top. It’s about nine days of ascent and two days of descent,” said Dr. Goel.

Dr. Goel said he hopes they can reach the top of Kilimanjaro on August 26 as they will make about seven stops on the way up.

The group will too document their trip on their website as well as several social media platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and Tick ​​tock.

You can also Click here to donate to support their educational path.