U.S. CDC says folks ought to ‘keep away from cruise journey, no matter vaccination standing’

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday advised people against cruises regardless of their vaccination status after a recent surge in positive Covid cases on board ships due to the highly contagious one Omicron variant conquered the world.

The CDC has raised its travel warning for cruises to the highest level as the agency investigates or monitors dozens of ships that have had Covid outbreaks.

Cruise lines operating in US waters reported approximately 5,000 cases of Covid to the CDC between December 15 and 29, a sharp increase compared to the first two weeks of the month when 162 cases were reported.

“It is particularly important that travelers who come to a increased risk of serious illness of COVID-19, avoid travel on cruise lines, including river cruises, worldwide regardless of vaccination status, “said the CDC.

Royal Caribbean Cruises, Norwegian Cruise Line and Carnival stocks fell on the news.

The CDC warned that Covid is easily transmitted between people in close proximity on ships and that the likelihood of contracting the virus while on a cruise is very high, even for people who are vaccinated and have received a booster dose.

The CDC advised people who choose to cruise to get vaccinated before their trip and receive a booster dose if necessary. Face masks should also be worn in common areas. Passengers who are not fully vaccinated should quarantine themselves for five days after the trip, according to the CDC.

The CDC also said that people taking a cruise should get tested 1 to 3 days before departure and 3 to 5 days after their trip, regardless of vaccination status or symptoms.

However, many Americans who wish to take tests at home have found empty shelves in many pharmacies due to a national shortage, and the lines in clinics can sometimes be hours.

Brian Salerno of the Cruise Lines International Association said the trading group was disappointed with the CDC’s decision.

“We are obviously disappointed with the CDC’s decision to raise the level of travel for cruises today – especially given the overwhelming effectiveness of cruise protocols, which result in significantly lower incidents on cruises compared to land,” said Salerno.

Covid cases in the US have risen to pandemic high. The US reported a seven-day average of more than 300,000 daily new Covid cases on Wednesday, an 82% increase from last week, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky said Wednesday that Omicron is driving the rapid surge in Covid cases.

Correction: Norwegian Cruise Lines and Carnival stocks lost more than 2% on the news. Royal Caribbean fell 1.93%. An earlier version of this story misrepresented Royal Caribbean’s stock movement.

Omicron accounts for 90% of Covid circumstances in some components of the U.S., CDC director says

A test tube labeled “COVID-19 Test Positive” can be seen in this illustration dated December 11, 2021 in front of the words “OMICRON SARS-COV-2”.

Given Ruvic | Reuters

The omicron Covid-19 variant has quickly overtaken Delta as the dominant strain of the virus in the US, accounting for 90% of cases in some parts of the country, said CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky on Wednesday.

The variant accounts for more than 73% of cases in the US on Saturday, according to the latest data from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Last week, US health officials said Omicron accounted for 2.9% of all cases sequenced by December 11, but later revised that number to 12.6%.

Walensky said the highly mutated and contagious strain is responsible for up to 90% of infections in the eastern Atlantic states, parts of the Midwest, the southern and northern Pacific states.

“This rapid increase in the percentage of omicrons circulating across the country is similar to what we’ve seen around the world,” she told reporters during a press conference on Covid-19 at the White House.

This story evolves. Check again for updates.

CDC panel recommends Pfizer, Moderna vaccines over J&J attributable to uncommon blood clot circumstances

A health care worker holds a dose of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.

Phill Magakoe | AFP | Getty Images

An advisory board for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday recommended Pfizer and Modern‘s vaccines over Johnson & Johnson‘s shot for adults ages 18 and up after dozens of people found a rare blood clot after the J&J vaccination, all of whom were hospitalized and nine of them died.

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices has unanimously decided to recommend Pfizer and Moderna over the Johnson & Johnson vaccine. CDC director Rochelle Walensky has yet to accept the recommendation.

The CDC has confirmed 54 cases of people who develop blood clots and have low blood platelet levels, a new condition known as thrombosis with thrombocytopenia syndrome that mainly affects younger women. All patients were hospitalized, nine people died and 36 were treated in the intensive care unit.

The US has administered more than 17 million J&J doses since the Food and Drug Administration approved the emergency syringe in February.

“TTS case reporting rates after Janssen vaccines are higher in men and women in a wider age range than previous estimates,” said Dr. Keipp Talbot, chairman of the CDC’s vaccines and safety subgroup, the advisory body.

Although the panel’s recommendation was unanimous, some members struggled with the vote. The CDC experts could also have recommended giving up the shot altogether or restricting it to certain age or demographic groups.

Dr. Pablo Sanchez, a professor of pediatrics at Ohio State University, said he was not recommending J&J admission to any of his patients, despite ultimately standing for the panel’s proposal.

“I just can’t recommend a vaccine associated with a disease that can lead to death,” Sanchez told the committee. “I don’t recommend it to any of my patients’ parents.”

Seven of the patients who died were women and two men, with a mean age of 45 years. Most of the deceased had previous health conditions such as obesity, high blood pressure and diabetes. The death reporting rate was 0.57 deaths per million doses administered, according to the CDC.

“In reviewing these cases, we noticed how quickly patient status deteriorates and leads to death,” said Dr. Isaac See of the CDC’s Vaccine Safety Team joined the advisory board.

According to the CDC, patients typically developed symptoms 9 days after vaccination and were hospitalized 5 days after symptoms appeared. The overwhelming majority of patients were women, 37 total, and the mean age was 44. Seventeen men developed TTS.

Johnson & Johnson’s director of global therapeutic vaccines Penny Heaton defended the company’s shot during the meeting, saying it “saves lives here in the US and on every continent around the world”.

“It’s easy to store and transport,” said Heaton. “In many low- and middle-income countries, our vaccine is the primary and sometimes even the only option in the US as its permanent protection may be the preferred choice for people who cannot or do not want to return for multiple vaccinations.”

Heaton said J&J recognizes the incidents of TTS related to the vaccine and that the condition can be fatal, although cases are rare. She said patient safety and wellbeing remain a top priority for J&J, and the company has several studies underway to identify risk factors related to developing TTS.

In April, the Food and Drug Administration and the CDC stopped briefly the use of the Johnson & Johnson single vaccine after six adult women developed blood clots and low platelet counts at the same time.

A week later, the FDA and the CDC did canceled the break on J&J shots after the independent advisory panel said the benefits of the shots outweigh the risks. At the time, the panel did not recommend restricting admissions based on age or gender. It suggested that the FDA put a warning label on for women under 50.

The FDA has advised health care providers not to give a J&J booster to people who have developed TTS in the past after the first injection. The FDA also said the J&J syringe should not be given to people who received the vaccine from AstraZeneca, even though AstraZeneca is not approved for use in the United States

CDC experts said Thursday that people who received J&J booster doses have not seen any cases of TTS, although the number of boosters is relatively small.

“Currently available evidence supports a causal relationship between TTS and the Janssen COVID-19 vaccine,” the FDA said in the factsheet for healthcare providers.

In October, the FDA and CDC approved authorized J&J boosters for all adults at least two months after receiving their first J&J syringe. More than 800,000 people have received J&J boosters, according to CDC data. People who received their primary vaccination with the J&J shot can also be boosted with the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines.

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No circumstances of omicron variant discovered within the U.S. up to now, CDC says

Pediatric doses of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine lie on a table at National Jewish Health on November 3, 2021 in Denver, Colorado.

Michael Ciaglo | Getty Images News

The US has not yet found any cases of the new Omicron Covid variant, the CDC announced late Friday, referring to a heavily mutated strain of the virus that the World Health Organization has classified as a “variant of concern”.

“So far, no cases of this variant have been identified in the USA,” said the statement by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“CDC continuously monitors variants and the US variant monitoring system has reliably detected new variants in this country. We expect Omicron to be identified quickly if it shows up in the US, ”it said.

The newly identified strain – referred to as Pedigree B.1.1.529 – Was first discovered in South Africa and was a cause for concern due to the rapid rise in the number of coronavirus cases in the country’s Gauteng province.

The UN health agency only designates strains of Covid as worrying variants if they are more transmissible, more virulent, or better at bypassing vaccines and therapeutics.

“This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are worrying,” said the World Health Organization. “Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection in this variant compared to others” [variants of concern]. The number of cases of this variant seems to be increasing in almost all provinces of South Africa. “

The US on Friday imposed travel restrictions on non-US citizens from South Africa and seven other countries in the region. The restrictions begin Monday and are part of a global effort to mitigate the spread of Omicron, according to senior Biden government officials.

The other countries affected by the ban were Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia and Zimbabwe.

It was not known how long the restrictions would apply.

– CNBC’s Christina Wilkie contributed to this report.

CDC director on whether or not children ought to go trick-or-treating on Halloween

NEW YORK, NY – OCTOBER 31: A child dressed up as Wonder Woman for Halloween in Fort Green Park on October 31, 2020 in New York City. The CDC posted on its website alternative ways to safely celebrate the holiday. (Photo by David Dee Delgado / Getty Images)

David Dee Delgado | Getty Images News | Getty Images

Kids should be able to sweet or treat this Halloween with a few caveats, Rochelle Walensky, Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said on Sunday.

“I definitely hope so,” said Walensky on CBS’s “Face the Nation” when asked if it was safe for kids to trick or treat this year. “If you are able to be outside, absolutely,” she said.

The head of the CDC also recommended that parents and children limit the crowd on Halloween.

“I wouldn’t necessarily go to a crowded Halloween party, but I think we should let our kids go trick or treating in small groups,” Walensky said. “I hope we can do that this year.”

On Monday, Pfizer and BioNTech announced A smaller dose of their Covid-19 vaccine is safe and produces a “robust” immune response in a clinical study with children 5 to 11 years old.

Pfizer CEO and Chairman Albert Bourla said the data would soon be presented to the Food and Drug Administration.

“It’s a matter of days, not weeks” Bourla said in an interview on ABC’s “This Week”.

“Then it’s up to the FDA to review the data and come to its conclusions and whether or not to approve it,” said Bourla. “If they approve, we will be ready with our manufacturing to provide this new formulation of the vaccine.”

The vaccine for children ages 5-11 is “a third of the dose we give the rest of the population”.

Meanwhile, with most schools back on track, CDC’s Walensky told This Week that children who get the coronavirus primarily don’t get it while they are in school.

“Our science has actually shown that the disease generally comes from the community,” said Walensky. “If schools have an adequate containment and prevention strategy, their transmission doesn’t happen there.”

If proper security precautions are not taken in schools, transmission is much higher, the CDC chief said.

Most schools, 96%, stayed open that school year, Walensky said.

“Still, we also published a study from Arizona that showed that places where no masks were attached were three and a half times the risk of outbreaks than places where masks were attached,” Walensky said.

“We know how to protect them,” said Walensky. “And if we don’t use the right containment strategies, outbreaks are more likely and need to be closed.”

CDC director defends controversial name on Pfizer’s Covid boosters

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, insisted Friday that she did not override a vaccine advisory committee by getting approval from the CDC for Pfizers Covid boosters are supposed to accept a proposal that has been rejected by the committee.

In an unusual move, Walensky broke out of the CDC’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which on Thursday voted 9 to 6 against approving vaccines for those in high-risk environments.

Walensky adopted the other recommendations of the panel Distribute third syringes to adults with pre-existing conditions and to anyone aged 65 and over. She said the final vote to release additional doses for teachers, health workers and other key employees was a “scientific scarcity”.

“I want to be very clear that I have not overridden an advisory committee,” said Walensky at a Covid briefing in the White House on Friday. “I have listened to all of the FDA advisory committee proceedings and listened carefully to this extraordinary group of scientists who spent hours publicly and very transparently on some of these very difficult questions and where the science stood.”

Dr. Rochelle Walensky, selected as director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, speaks during an event at The Queen Theater in Wilmington, Del., Tuesday, December 8, 2020.

Susan Walsh | AP

Walensky’s directive is closely based on that of the Food and Drug Administration Verdict on boosters Wednesday. This agency similarly defied the advice of its scientific advisory board by authorizing the recordings for a wider audience than it was advocating Advisory Committee on Vaccines and Related Biological Products.

“This was a scientific scarcity,” said Walensky, noting the lengthy two-day meeting and robust debate. “It was my call. If I had been in the room I would have voted yes.”

She tried to build public confidence by encouraging people to go back and listen to the committee’s deliberations. “We made it public, we made it transparent, and we did it with some of the best scientists in the country,” she added.

Dr. Paul Offit, an infectious disease doctor at Philadelphia Children’s Hospital and a voting member of the FDA’s advisory committee, turned down boosters for young people fearing they could cause myocarditis. Offit called Walensky’s expansion of the ACIP recommendation “a first,” adding that he felt Pfizer should have conducted more extensive booster studies before submitting its results to the FDA and CDC.

“As a healthy person under 30, I would wait and see how that goes,” Offit told CNBC. “Wait for a few million cans to get out of there.”

But with the US recording a seven-day average of 2,011 deaths per day on Thursday, 6% more than a week ago, according to a CNBC analysis of data from Johns Hopkins University, other doctors support Walensky’s decision.

Adjusting the panel’s guidelines was Walensky’s responsibility, even if it broke the precedent, said Dr. Arturo Casadevall, Chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

“These committees are advisory,” said Casadevall. “Ultimately, this is a matter of policy, and politics requires judgment.”

President Joe Biden said at a briefing Friday that the CDC’s recommendation had widened the boosters to roughly 60 million Americans, including educators, health workers and supermarket employees. The broader booster criteria better protect frontline workers and account for the vaccine delivery inequalities that affect people of color, Walensky said.

“I am also aware of the disproportionate impact of this pandemic on racial and ethnic minority communities,” Walensky said. “Many of our frontline workers, key workers, and those in meeting places come from communities that are already hardest hit.”

She said denying these groups access to boosters will only exacerbate inequalities in the pandemic, which have caused black and Hispanic Covid patients to die more often than whites.

More than 55% of the US is fully vaccinated, and more than 2.4 million Americans have received boosters since the agency approved them for people with compromised immune systems on Aug. 13, according to the CDC.

Walensky said the agency will work to evaluate the booster data from Quickly Modern and Johnson & Johnson In the coming weeks.

“We intend to have numerous advisory boards at the CDC to review many pending decisions, including Moderna, J&J, and pediatric vaccinations,” said Walensky.

CDC endorses third Pfizer doses for high-risk adults

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention did on Friday the distribution of Pfizer and BioNTech‘s Covid-19 booster vaccinations for older Americans and other vulnerable people, including those in high-risk professional and institutional settings.

Millions of Americans at the highest risk of Covid can now get a Pfizer BioNTech booster shot to increase their protection.

The Agency’s Advisory Committee on Vaccination Practices had previously unanimously endorsed Pfizer’s third vaccination for people 65 years and over and residents of nursing homes and made further recommendations.

CDC director Dr. However, Rochelle Walensky made a recommendation that the advisory panel rejected. The panel voted against giving a booster vaccination to those ages 18 to 64 who were at higher risk of exposure to the virus because of their work place or institutional setting, but Walensky reintroduced that recommendation.

Here’s what the CDC recommends:

  • Individuals 65 years of age and older and residents in long-term care facilities should receive a booster of Pfizer-BioNTech’s Covid vaccine at least 6 months after their Pfizer BioNTech Primary Series;
  • People between the ages of 50 and 64 with pre-existing conditions should receive a booster vaccination from Pfizer-BioNTech at least 6 months after their Pfizer BioNTech primary series;
  • Individuals aged 18 to 49 with underlying conditions may receive a booster dose of Pfizer BioNTech vaccine for at least 6 months after their Pfizer BioNTech Primary Series, depending on individual benefit and risk;
  • Individuals aged 18 to 64 who are at increased risk of exposure and transmission of Covid-19 due to their professional or institutional environment can, depending on the individual, receive a booster dose of the vaccine for at least 6 months after their Pfizer BioNTech primary vaccination course Pfizer-BioNTech receive benefits and risks.

“I believe that we can best meet the country’s public health needs by providing booster doses to the elderly, those in long-term care facilities, those with underlying medical conditions, and adults at high risk of illness from occupational and institutional exposure to COVID. 19, “said Dr. Walensky.

The move is in line with FDA booster approval, she added.

Earlier Thursday, the CDC advisory panel battled a controversial proposal to boost large swaths of the US population and rejected the plan by 9-6 votes. It would have distributed the shots to nursing home staff, people who live or work in prisons and homeless shelters, frontline health workers, unpaid caregivers, and other key workers like teachers.

“I mean, we might as well say give it to anyone over the age of 18,” said committee member Dr. Pablo Sanchez before voting against the proposal.

Lisa Wilson receives a syringe of the Pfizer vaccine at a mobile COVID-19 vaccination center in Orlando, Florida.

Paul Hennessy | SOPA pictures | LightRakete | Getty Images

Dr. Leana Wen, emergency doctor and former Baltimore health commissioner, called the CDC panel’s vote to reject boosters more generally a “mistake” on Twitter.

“Really, are we not allowing health workers, many of whom were vaccinated back in December, to be boostered? What about teachers in cramped classrooms that don’t require masks? ”She tweeted, adding that CDC Director Dr. Walensky should override the recommendation.

The recommendation goes nowhere near as far as President Joe Biden sought. His government said it plans to give booster shots to people aged 16 and over this week. While the CDC panel’s recommendation doesn’t give the Biden administration everything it wanted, boosters will still be around for millions of Americans who originally received Pfizer’s shots.

Confirmation comes a day after the Food and Drug Administration issued emergency use authorization give many Americans third Pfizer shots six months after completing the first two doses. While the CDC committee’s recommendation is non-binding, Walensky is expected to accept the committee’s approval shortly.

Walensky addressed the committee on Thursday ahead of the vote, thanking them for their work and setting out what is at stake.

“These dates are not perfect, but together they paint a picture for us, and they are what we have right now to make a decision about the next phase of this pandemic,” she said.

Before the vote, some committee members expressed concern that the wide range of boosters on offer could affect efforts to get unvaccinated vaccines or reduce confidence in the vaccines’ effectiveness. Others were frustrated that only Pfizer recipients were eligible for the syringes, leaving millions of Americans out of the picture for receiving the Modern and Johnson & Johnson Vaccinations.

The vote came at the end of a two-day meeting during which CDC advisors listened to several presentations of data to support the widespread adoption of booster vaccinations, including one from a Pfizer executive showing data showing a third Injection appears to be safe and increases antibody levels in recipients.

During a presentation on Thursday, CDC officer Dr. Sara Oliver observational studies from Israel in which officials in front of many other countries began vaccinating the country’s population and offering third vaccinations to their citizens in late July.

The Israeli data has been criticized by at least one FDA official for being based on so-called observational studies, which do not meet the same standards as formal clinical studies.

“We can use Israel’s experience to reinforce our knowledge of booster safety,” Oliver said, adding that the country reported only one case of a rare heart infection known as myocarditis out of nearly 3 million third doses administered .

CDC officer Dr. Kathleen Dooling said the data also suggest a third dose may reduce the risk of serious illness in older adults and people with comorbidities. Possible risks include myocarditis, although this risk is very rare and mostly occurs in men under 30, she said.

“The third dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech Covid-19 vaccine appears to have a similar reactogenicity as the second dose,” she added.

The issue of who and when to get boosters has been a controversial issue in the scientific community since the Biden government outlined its plan last month to distribute them widely.

In published a paper Days before an FDA advisory session last week, a leading group of scientists said the available data showed that vaccine protection against serious illnesses persists even as efficacy against mild illness wears off over time. The authors, including two senior FDA officials and several World Health Organization scientists, claimed in the medical journal The Lancet that widespread use of booster syringes to the general public is currently inappropriate.

In the outlines of the plans for last month’s launch Distribute boosters this week, Biden administration officials cited three CDC studies showing that vaccine protection against Covid has waned over several months. Senior health officials said at the time they feared protection from serious illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths could “wear off” in the coming months, especially for those at higher risk or vaccinated during the earlier stages of vaccination.

– CNBC’s Robert Towey contributed to this report.

Covid vaccines do not improve threat of miscarriage or delivery defects, CDC says

A pregnant woman is given a vaccine for coronavirus disease (COVID-19) at the Skippack pharmacy in Schwenksville, Pennsylvania, USA on February 11, 2021.

Hannah Beier | Reuters

Getting vaccinated against Covid doesn’t increase the risk of miscarriages or birth defects, officials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

The CDC prosecuted 1,613 pregnant women who a Covid-19 Vaccine, 30% of which were vaccinated in the second trimester while the remaining 70% received their vaccinations in the third trimester, said Dr. Christine Olson, a doctor with the CDC, told the agency’s Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices on Wednesday.

These participants gave birth to 1,634 children, including 42 twins.

“We reviewed the currently available registry data and found no evidence of an increase in spontaneous abortion rates or any disproportionately negative birth outcomes in infants,” said Olson.

The 1,613 participants were part of the CDC’s v-safe pregnancy registry, which had 5,096 participants as of September 13. The CDC reported that 79.4% of the registry participants were white, 8.4% Asian, 8.1% Hispanic, and 1.4% black. About 65% were between 25 and 34 years old, 33% were 35 to 44 years old.

Olson cited a CDC study of miscarriage-related Covid vaccines conducted December 14 through July 19. The report included a 12.8% risk of miscarriage by 20 weeks of pregnancy in 2,456 participants who received Pfizer or Moderna vaccines while pregnant. This is the normal risk of miscarriage after adjusting for the mother’s age.

Of the 1,634 babies Olson examined, 99 were premature babies, 45 were considered small for their gestational age, and 158 needed an intensive care unit. There were no infant deaths in the group.

Only 45 babies in the group were born with birth defects, and Olson did not report any unusual types or clusters of birth defects to the panel. Covid vaccines are also not linked to stillbirth, said Dr. Elyse Kharbanda, a researcher from the HealthPartners Institute, who presented her results to the committee.

Kharbanda monitored pregnant, Covid-immunized individuals within the CDC’s vaccine safety data link from December to July and recorded 11,300 live births compared to 26 stillbirths during that period. Placental complications, obstetric complications, and maternal comorbidities were the main causes of these stillbirths, said Kharbanda.

“No worrying patterns related to timing of vaccine exposure or the etiology of stillbirths have been identified,” said Kharbanda.

The CDC reports that pregnant people are at higher risk for tougher Covid cases than the non-pregnant population. According to the agency, Covid also increases the likelihood of premature birth.

CDC advises unvaccinated folks towards journey over Labor Day weekend

CDC director Dr. Rochelle Walensky advised unvaccinated people against traveling for the upcoming Labor Day weekend as the US battles a surge in Covid-19 hospital admissions from the highly contagious Delta variant.

“Given the current situation with disease transmission, we would say that people need to consider these risks for themselves when considering travel,” Walensky said during a Covid briefing at the White House Tuesday, noting that people who fully vaccinated and wearing masks can travel. “If you are not vaccinated, we advise you not to travel.”

Health systems in the US have struggled with record hospital admissions in the past few weeks, with several states including Washington, Mississippi and Florida all reached record highs in new Covid cases and hospital admissions.

The current seven-day average of new Covid infections in the US is 129,418 cases per day, a 10% decrease from the previous week’s seven-day average, Walensky said.

The seven-day average for Covid hospital admissions is around 11,500 hospital admissions per day, a decrease of about 5% from last week’s seven-day average, she said, citing data provided by the centers for that Disease control and prevention were collected.

Covid deaths had only increased 2.3% from the previous week to a seven-day average of 896 deaths per day, she said.

Walensky also recommended spending time with other vaccinated family members outdoors on Labor Day weekend and masking oneself indoors, especially in public, to prevent transmission.

“During the pandemic, we saw the vast majority of transmission among unvaccinated people happen indoors,” Walensky said. “Masks aren’t forever, but they are for now.”

CDC scientist says knowledge is proscribed to judge shot for normal inhabitants

A CDC scientist said Monday that the data needed to properly evaluate Covid-19 vaccine booster vaccinations for the general population is limited – even if President Joe Biden pressures health officials to delete the vaccinations widespread use early in the week from September 20th.

The presentation by Dr. Sara Oliver at a meeting of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Group suggests the panel may limit its initial endorsement of additional shots to vulnerable groups and healthcare workers.

A nurse vaccinates 15-year-old Sherri Trimble at a vaccination clinic at Health First Medical Center in Melbourne, Florida.

Paul Hennessy | SOPA pictures | LightRakete | Getty Images

Several studies suggest that the approved Covid vaccines may still be effective in preventing serious illness and hospitalization, but may be less effective in preventing infections or mild symptomatic illnesses, according to Oliver. The CDCs The Advisory Committee on Vaccination Practices meets on Monday Consider booster vaccinations for all eligible Americans. The panel is also due to vote on the final approval of the Pfizer vaccine by the Food and Drug Administration.

Since the highly contagious Delta variant first appeared, the vaccine’s effectiveness ranged from 39% to 84%, according to Oliver’s presentation, which referred to several separate studies. A study that looked at health care workers and first responders showed that the vaccine’s overall effectiveness dropped to about 65% in July – up from about 90% in February. Israel dates show Pfizer’s vaccine effectiveness has dropped to just 39% in that country.

Scientists have said that the vaccines become less effective over time, and the Delta variant is a more resilient strain that is able to break through that protection.

According to Oliver’s presentation slides, “it is important to monitor efficacy trends by disease severity over time”.

It was pointed out on the slides that vaccines often require multiple doses. Hepatitis B and HPV vaccinations, for example, require a third dose after six months.

“Vaccines that require more than one dose don’t necessarily mean that an annual booster is required,” Oliver said during the presentation.

Once booster shots are available, nursing home residents, health care providers, and the elderly – the first groups to be vaccinated in December and January – will likely be given priority for the additional vaccinations, according to the CDC slides.

The CDC stressed that vaccinating the unvaccinated should be a “top priority” and giving booster doses to vaccinated individuals should not deter those who remain unprotected from the virus.

The agency also emphasized the importance of vaccine availability around the world.

“An uncontrolled global spread that could lead to new variants threatens the control of the pandemic everywhere,” said Oliver. In addition to global distribution, policy on boosters “should also consider equity in the US population,” she added.

Monday’s meeting comes after President Joe Biden said Friday US regulators are considering giving Covid booster vaccinations five months after completing the primary series and bringing forward the expected schedule for a third vaccination by three months.

Scientists have sharply criticized The Biden government’s urge to distribute booster syringes widely says the data provided by federal health officials are not compelling enough to currently recommend third vaccinations for most of the American population.

The Biden government has publicly stated that the third dose will not be given without FDA approval and a vote from ACIP.