Alumni elevate cash for most cancers, males’s well being with growing-out-mustache marketing campaign

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The facial hair waxing for the month of November is very important to Adam Brodstein. He is a member of Syracuse University’s fundraising team for Movember, an annual campaign to raise awareness of prostate and testicular cancer, as well as mental health and suicide prevention. Growing out a mustache or facial hair is the iconic symbol of the fundraising challenge.

“I almost never have facial hair. I wear a mustache all month and so many of my friends come up to me and ask, ‘Oh, what’s your mustache?’ ”Said Brodstein. “It just gives me one excuse to talk about it.”

Brodstein, a 2018 graduate of SU, joined the university’s Movember fundraising team while studying. However, he is not alone in his efforts. The SU team, Boys Things, has over 100 members, many of whom are SU alumni or current students. Boys Things has been part of Movember for almost a decade, growing in size and money every year. Boys Things is Movembers’ No. 1 University Team in terms of money raised, and the No. 4 team in the United States for 2021 and raised over $ 67,500 by Sunday evening.

“We all realized that (Movembers Mission) really has an impact on all of our lives. And then (Boys Things) really got expanded, ”said Brodstein.

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Movember was founded in Australia in 2003. Originally it was only supposed to raise money for prostate cancer and men’s health. Over the course of nearly two decades, Movember, an abbreviation of the words mustache – or “mo” for short – and November has grown into a global initiative in which teams collect donations 19 countries plus Hong Kong. Individuals, teams or companies can take part in the initiative. Individuals can also donate to the cause through a participating fundraiser or team.

Boys Things has grown under the guidance of 2017 graduate Michael Dellon. He is currently the team’s captain and has been in this role for seven years. Dellon’s journey with Movember began as a philanthropic project within his fraternity. However, his personal commitment to Movember has led him to expand the reach of the fundraiser since he graduated.

“The reason I became captain is because I actually survived cancer twice, so it was something that really got me excited,” said Dellon.

Movember and Boys Things rely on grassroots donations, with members posting on social media and contacting family and friends.
Courtesy Michael Dellon

Dellon contributed to the success of Boys Things fundraising as captain. His goal is to increase member engagement on the team by promoting social media advertising and grassroots fundraising.

“I always move the goalposts a bit,” said Dellon. “We met our goal of ($ 60,000); I’ll probably move that to something that’s achievable but higher. “

This year Dellon and other celebrity Boys Things held a personal fundraiser at The Craic, a Brooklyn bar where the team raised nearly $ 10,000. The personal fundraiser was Boys Things’ biggest event this month, and Dellon hopes to host more of it. He also wants to supply the SU alumni in cities outside of New York City.

“I think it might be cool if we have another event in Boston or LA,” said Dellon. “If we have the team out there that supports it in some way, then we are definitely something to be prepared for.”

The team emphasizes its basic approach to fundraising and relies on the connections maintained through the team’s social network. This method encompasses a variety of fundraising strategies, including reaching out to individual family members and friends and posting graphics on social media.

Noah Garson, a 2018 SU graduate and third highest fundraiser for Boys Things, has been participating in Movember for five years. He has had success at fundraising on Instagram, relying on consistent story posts and reminders from the month-long campaign. He stressed the importance of having a strong reason for fundraising.

“I think I raised about $ 300 in my first year. But since then … I find a different motivation every year. It was the first few years for Michael, ”said Garson. “In 2019 my father was diagnosed with cancer. And that was above all my motivation. “

Within the Page for boys things There is a tracker on the Movember website for the money raised by the team as a whole and the money raised by each member. These features provide an easy way for the team and individual members to track their progress and growth from year to year and continuously break their own records.

Due to the team’s success in the leaderboards this year, Dellon would like to continue recruiting fundraisers at the SU and increase the presence of the fundraising initiative on campus.

“It’s all about not just recruiting more people, but the right people, and getting the word out where we can,” said Dellon. “The greatest thing is simply trying to make the team an extension of Syracuse and leaving it open to anyone who wants to help and make a difference.”

BuddyCheck24: Fresno thrift retailer elevating cash for American Most cancers Society

FRESNO, Calif. (KSEE) – As we near Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October, there is a unique opportunity to support the fight against breast cancer and perhaps collect a treasure or two along the way.

Saving for treasures, hunting for special or useful items at a bargain price. It happens every day at the American Cancer Discovery Shop in Fresno.

“We just have a nice shop. It’s not marketed like a thrift store. It really is a beautiful boutique, ”explains Branch Manager Bonnie O’neal.

Saturday September 25th marks 56 years for Discovery Shops. Founded in Los Angeles in 1965 by a woman named Denise Noel, who socialized with the Hollywood elite and raised money for the American Cancer Society through the sale of her donated goods.

Today 45 Discovery Shops are scattered across California, including the one in Bullard and West in Fresno.

The store is beautifully decorated by store volunteers, many of whom are cancer survivors. It is filled with donated clothing for men, women and children. And household and decorative items galore, with all proceeds going towards research, education and support for cancer patients.

“Absolutely, that’s the main reason we’re here and it feels good every day to know,” said O’Neal.

The Discovery shop also stocks wigs donated by local wig shops. Cancer patients can choose one for free.
“And if you need one more, you can come back and get a new one,” O’Neal explained.

Every item on display has been curated for quality. Some of it is extremely high-end. In fact, on October 28th for Breast Cancer Awareness Month, customers will be able to shop from a special collection of designer clothes and accessories.

“We saved goods, as you can see. We have some nice, nice items here. Salvatore Ferragamo, Louis Vuitton, Chanel, ”said O’Neal.

Whether you donate to the shop or buy here, it’s a win all round.

With the ultimate winner is the American Cancer Society and the important community it serves.

The Fresno Discovery Shop is open Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm. You can support it by shopping to donate your used items, with all proceeds going to benefit the American Cancer Society.

Hockey event raises cash to battle most cancers

MARQUETTE, Michigan (WLUC) – A group of hockey players helped raise money to help fight cancer.

This was the fifth year for Stick it to Cancer.

A total of 15 teams from all over UP, Lower Michigan and Wisconsin played in the Lakeview Arena on Friday and Saturday.

All proceeds are shared between Cancer Care of Marquette County and a resident undergoing cancer treatment.

Northern Michigan University hockey players were umpires for the event.

“It’s always good to give back to the community and they do so much for us that the least we can do to shoot for them,” said Connor Marritt, Northern Michigan University hockey player.

“This is such a hockey community and there haven’t been any adult tournaments in a while,” said Barbara Salmela, Stick it to Cancer Organizer. “It’s just nice when it’s local.”

The championship games will be played on Sunday, September 26th at 10 am and 11 am. Admission is free, but donations are accepted.

Copyright 2021 WLUC. All rights reserved.

Lemonade stand to boost cash for pediatric most cancers

BELLEAIR BLUFFS, Florida – “There is so little money going into pediatric cancer research, I think about 3% of the money going into cancer research goes into pediatric cancer research. And that’s just so sad for me, ”explains Martha Thorn, team leader in the Thorn Collection at Coldwell Banker Realty.

For this reason, she set up a lemonade stand 8 years ago to raise money for child cancer research.

Thorn collection

“Last year we raised over $ 40,000 in two hours and our kids and grandchildren are working on the lemonade stand,” explains Thorn.

This year the lemonade stand is in honor of Jackson Broom.

The broom family

The 4-year-old was diagnosed with something called DIPG, an inoperable brain tumor, on February 1st. Jackson died just 33 days later and two days before his fifth birthday.

“It is a very rapidly growing cancer that affects the basic necessities of life, such as breathing, eating, swallowing, and exercise,” explains Jeffrey Broom, Jackson’s father.

The brooms find their faith through the mourning process. They believe that he is no longer sick and one day they will be reunited.

Jackson broom 2.png

The broom family

“Jackson and his story have brought many blessings into our lives, in the lives of many people. So that doesn’t make it easy at all. But I think it really shows the purpose, the Jackson for being here, and just makes it bearable, “says his mother Kaitlyn Broom.” I think we love every opportunity to talk about Jackson, to share his story, to share and pass on his legacy. I think, at least for me, one of my greatest fears is that he will be forgotten. “

The lemonade stand will be open from 4pm to 6pm on Friday, September 24th in the Thorn Collection offices at 598 Indian Rocks Road. N in Belleair Bluffs.

Lemonade stand

The Thorn Collection

Click here for more informations.

You can also donate online in honor of Jackson Broom click here.

Denver7 On a regular basis Hero bikes throughout the nation to boost cash for uncommon most cancers analysis

DENVER – Alec Fraser and Jamie Meehan will tell you the idea of ​​cycling nearly 5,000 miles like most good ideas do.

“One evening over a mug of beer we decided to drive across the country,” said Meehan.

The real inspiration was born in a Connecticut hospital decades earlier.

“Julian was a very special person,” said his father Alec.

Julian Fraser was a kid with a big smile and an even bigger heart. An all-American swimmer and college water polo player, his father said he was happy and healthy until he turned 19 and received a devastating diagnosis.

“He had osteosarcoma, a bone cancer that mostly affects children and adolescents,” said Alec. “Unfortunately at the time of diagnosis it had already metastasized and it was in 14 different parts of his body and he had a huge tumor in his abdomen.”

After years of tough battle, Julian lost his battle with cancer in 2017.

“They gave him very little chance of survival. I remember once he took me aside and said, ‘Dad, I don’t care what they say, I’ll hit this.’ And he just fought this disease with all his might, ”said Alec.

The two draw from this strength when they cycle Julian’s Honor from Connecticut to California. Her goal is to raise half a million dollars for Cycle for Survival, which funds research into rare cancers.

“Over 50% of people with cancer have some form of rare cancer, and yet only 4 cents of every dollar raised for cancer research goes to rare cancer research. So it’s very important to us, ”said Alec.

This week, Team JF made it to Colorado. A crowd of supporters accompanied her for long distances while the teenager was never far from her thoughts.

“I think of the fight Julian went through and the fights he had and there is a huge reservoir of commitment to keep it going and that’s why I think of him in the harder times that I drive” said Meehan.

Nothing will fill the hole Julian left, but Team JF hopes this ride to honor the teenager gives hope to those still struggling.

“I do that every now and then, of course I think of Julian and think of his life, great memories we had with Julian and the feeling, alright, he looks down at us and smiles at what we’re doing, so feels that look really good, “said Alec.

If you would like to donate to Cycle for Survival, visit their website.

Molly Hendrickson anchors at Denver7 from 4:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. It also features a different 7Everyday Hero on Denver7 every week. Follow Molly Facebook here and Twitter here. To appoint a hero in your life Click here.

Beavercreek most cancers survivor runs 100+ miles to lift cash for Foodbank, NAACP. Right here’s how he did it:

BEAVERCREEK, Ohio (WDTN) – In 2004 Beavercreek’s father, Randy Kreill, was diagnosed with an aggressive form of thyroid cancer. He was 42 years old at the time and wanted to take control of his health.

“Instead of being scared of something I didn’t want, I turned around to focus on something I wanted that was positive,” he explained.

Kreill discovered and read “Born to run”A book detailing how the Tarahumara Indians used a plant-based diet and lifestyle based on walking barefoot to stay healthy and complete.

In the past ten years, Kreill has changed his lifestyle and started running “ultra marathons”. Ultra marathons are all distances over 50km and he has run more than 71km in the last ten years. Some of these marathons were more than 100 miles long.

Kreill credits his positive thinking, plant-based diet, and minimalist “barefoot-inspired” style Sandals for his success.

In 2020, two global events prompted him to take his running to the next level.

When the coronavirus pandemic first started, Kriell said he saw so many people in need in his community.

“So many people were unemployed, people were starving … so I thought maybe I could do my 100 mile run and raise money for the food bank here in Dayton,” he said.

On that first attempt, he ran from Beavercreek to Loveland Ohio and back … more than 100 miles in total. He raised more than $ 1,500.

Then, after George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis and subsequent protests and rallies, his daughters inspired him to do another race. This time he ran from Beavercreek to the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati. He again raised more than $ 1,500 to donate to the NAACP’s Legal Defense Fund.

Through his racing and humanity, Kriell continues to heal his body from cancer. He feels in top form and wants to keep running for many years to come. He also hopes to inspire others to adopt healthy lifestyles and live well.

“I hope it never ends when I can take on these adventures and ask my body to do crazy things,” he said.

For more information on Kreill’s marathon methods and journey, see here

‘Kickin Most cancers’ by operating and elevating cash for a coworker

SIOUX FALLS, SD (KELO) – A lot of people say their colleagues are like family.
This may be especially true of a Sioux Falls man who pursues an effusion from those he works with.

Over 200 people come together to raise money for a colleague and friend who is fighting cancer.

“Someone goes through something like that, you can’t just be by their side all the time. So just do what you can and help them shoulder the financial burden, ”said Lucas Holden, one of the organizers of the event.

Kole Vogt was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma after a seizure during a video call to work in July.

“We heard about Kole’s situation while working with him at Eide Bailey and we obviously wanted to help the family. It’s just, yes, expensive to go through all of these treatments and he has such a great family, ”said Paige Dejong, one of the organizers of the event.

Buffalo Ridge Brewing launches ‘Raising Hope IPA’ in aid of childhood cancer research

So, Eide Bailey staff put together a 3-mile run and a mile of walk to do just that. Kole and his family were even allowed to be there.

“We were stuck in the hospital for the last week, so it feels really good to be outside and see and feel the support,” said Janelle Vogt, Kole’s wife.

Kole has done three out of six rounds of chemo so far. Once he’s cancer free, his doctors want to do a bone marrow transplant. He says the support he has had throughout this trip has been overwhelming.

“Thanks to everyone who has given some kind of support, because there are so many different forms, be it to help the children, just to send prayers, or anything,” said Kole Vogt.

“We are really blessed to have the support crew that we do behind us. To be honest, we couldn’t do it without all the support, ”said Janelle Vogt.

Donations to the family will continue to be accepted through the event’s Venmo account (username: kickincancerwithkole) for the next few weeks. There is also a GoFundMe page for Kole that you can visit by clicking here.

Strolling To Elevate Cash & Consciousness For Childhood Most cancers Analysis In The Soo

“We are bringing awareness here and we hope to achieve more than that.”

Last year they ran 38 miles to raise $ 1,000 for childhood cancer research.

That year, the Crowns Against Cancer team walked downtown Sault Ste. Marie to raise more money and awareness.

Last year the Relay For Life team walked halfway around Chippewa County on the cause, this year an empty car went down Portage and Ashmun.

The car represents a child who died of cancer.

Volunteers say the people they met have been very generous.

“We have already received a lot of donations. Lots of people stopped here and then, both ways that we went, lots of people stopped us and asked us what we were doing today, so it was great, ”said Samantha Pomeroy, Team Crowns Against Cancer.

Anyone who missed the girls over the weekend can still donate to a good cause here.

Richmond charity stroll raises cash for childhood most cancers

RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – On Saturday, the Children’s Tumor Foundation hosted a Shine a Light NF Walk in Richmond’s Deep Run Park to help children with neurofibramatosis, a rare cancer.

Among those attending was Gabriel Bratton, 10, who was diagnosed with NF at 4 months of age but recently started new treatment that allowed him to use his right hand again.

“It’s like a tree, so it’s like the roots that get caught in the nerves and are very dangerous,” said Julie Cranor, Gabriel’s mother. “So it was a breeze to take the medication – it either worked or it didn’t.”

This drug is Koselugo, the first FDA-approved treatment for inoperable plexiform neurofibromas, the type of NF Gabriel. Although there is currently no cure, the CFT said in a press release that Gabriel’s tumor has shrunk by 20 percent.

After over a year in Koselugo, Cranor said: “It was great.”

When asked how he is, Gabriel only said: “Good!”

The walk was partly organized by the Gabriel team, which uses events like this to draw attention to NF and “walk and collect donations in its honor”.

“We couldn’t be more grateful to have an event like the Shine a Light NF Walk,” said Cranor. “It made us aware of how many people in our community are fighting just like Gabriel.”

Golf outing raises cash for childhood most cancers analysis

MIDDLETON (WKOW) – Golfers clicked the links on Thursday as part of a fundraiser to support cancer research in children.

Northwestern Mutual organized the sixth annual Driving Out Childhood Cancer Golf Cup at Middleton’s Pleasant View Golf Course.

“Despite the fact that thousands of children in the United States are diagnosed with cancer each year, only about 4% of national cancer funding goes to finding a cure for childhood cancer, raising money to find a cure,” said Sandy Botcher from Northwestern Mutual.

The event included a raffle and a live auction led by 27 sporting director Lance Veeser.