How LSU Coach Brian Kelly’s Offensive Type Has Tailored to the Instances Half I

There is a lot to digest with LSU head coach Brian Kelly. A coach known for using two running backs in formation, going empty (no running back), or anywhere in between. That was his story in Notre Dame and also before he came to Notre Dame.

What can LSU fans expect? Here is the first half of the information Tigers fans need to know, starting with the 2009 season when he was still coaching the Bearcats.

The first thing to know is that Cincinnati was fast playing; very fast. It was a really fast team and one that just wanted to beat its opponents. The Bearcats did not have the same kind of defense personnel as Notre Dame, and certainly not what he was given as head of the LSU. A few key data here.

First, Cincinnati averaged 38.6 points per game. Remember, this is before any team started throwing football everywhere, like in the last few years of college football. Coach Kelly was very open-minded about being a passing game.

The Bearcats would routinely not pull themselves together and overtake football as well as use zone reading concepts to keep the teams honest. The most ironic part of this team is that multiple quarterbacks were playing due to injuries and it still didn’t matter.

Dual-threat quarterback Zack Collaros passed for 10 scores, while pocket passer Tony Pike threw 29 touchdowns. It was impressive to see the Bearcats switch from one quarterback type to another and do so seamlessly.

Collaros started four games and never finished less than 70.8%. Pike, on the other hand, threw at least two touchdown passes at each start. Just looking at last season in Cincinnati and studying the quarterbacks, it’s interesting to be reminded once again of how versatile Coach Kelly’s offense really was. Once in Notre Dame, he had to undergo another change.

Kelly’s first year at Notre Dame was 2010. The Irish were up and down offensively as he took the reins of what was a real offensive under former head coach Charlie Weis and tried to turn it into a spread attack . The Irish averaged 26.3 points per competition, with the passing game averaging 253.1 yards per game and a total of 28 touchdowns.

The problem with Notre Dame was interception. Three different quarterbacks struggled not to turn the football around and it was a definite year of transition. The roaring attack helped make up some of the gap, averaging 126.6 yards per game and scoring 11 touchdowns.

2011 was pretty close to repetition at the quarterback, with second year old Tommy Rees (now Notre Dames Offensive Coordinator) taking the starting job in week three and the Irish averaging 252.6 yards per contest with 21 touchdown passes and 17 interceptions.

The key here was Tyler Eifert in the end, who caught 63 passes for 803 yards and five touchdowns. With Eifert drawing a lot of attention, Notre Dame did well in the game.

This is the season that Coach Kelly began to focus the offensive more on the running game. The Irish ran 160 yards eight different times, with running backs Cierre Wood and Jonas Gray adding 1,893 yards and 21 touchdowns. Notre Dame averaged 29.2 points per game in 2011.

From the undefeated regular season of Notre Dame 2012, the Irish adapted again. Rees played in many games, but the starter was quarterback Everett Golson. As a newbie to Redshirt, he was unpredictable which meant the Irish would turn to Rees and the frantic attack for stability and points. The Irish averaged only 25.8 points per game, but the defense was strong as it only allowed 12.8 points per fight.

Eifert caught 50 passes for 685 yards and four touchdowns. He was so difficult to keep up that Coach Kelly often set him up like a wide receiver. It caused inconsistencies with linebackers and security guards trying to defend Eifert. That helped in a stormy attack with a two-headed monster on top.

Between Theo Riddick and Cierre Wood, the two Irish runners added 1,659 yards and nine touchdowns on the ground. Golson also chipped in 298 yards and another six roaring touchdowns.

Coach Kelly knew how to leverage his team’s strengths, and he did. Defense, special teams, the running game and real-time big plays by Eifert carried the Irish.

Note: With Golson’s running ability, it certainly enhanced Notre Dame’s possibilities, and it’s something that Coach Kelly has returned to throughout his tenure at South Bend (see Kizer below).

As of the 2013 season, the Irish pass attack was very inconsistent as Golson and Rees fought back and forth. Neither of them could really take the starting position. They combined for 12 touchdowns and eight interceptions.

That season, Notre Dame stayed in the shotgun and led the game, but it was never a team that could really hold its own against the top defenses. In short, Notre Dame hasn’t been where it should be with offensive talent, especially with Eiftert in the NFL, nor with top notch talent and depth on offense. It hurt her and Coach Kelly’s offense.

The Irish averaged 150.9 yards per game on the ground. Even so, Notre Dame averaged 27.2 points per game.

In 2014, Notre Dame got off to a quick start but faded with a host of injuries on both sides of the game. The biggest takeaway was that Coach Kelly really stepped up the offensive style (due to injury if possible) and tossed the football around. Young wide receivers made a huge difference, with the Irish scoring 32.8 points per game.

Key to this particular season would be explosive wide receiver Will Fuller (4.32 40) and his ability to take the top of the defense. He caught 76 passes for 1,094 yards and 15 touchdowns. With him in the lineup, Notre Dame absolutely went for home run shots.

The passing game moved forward, averaging 285.5 yards per game, throwing 30 touchdowns and 14 interceptions. Despite the improved passing game, the Irish were still doing well in football.

Tarean Folston and Greg Bryant combined for 1,178 yards and nine touchdowns, while Golson ran for an additional 283 yards and eight touchdowns.

This would be the season when Notre Dame really had enough offensive staff to play power football or just to spread it. With Fuller out there, it was a lot easier. In 2015, the Irish had their most explosive offensive attack yet.

The even offense saw Notre Dame average 34.2 points per game despite starting a Redshirt freshman quarterback who was originally the third team during spring training. Signal Caller Deshone Kizer threw 2,880 yards, 21 touchdowns and 10 interceptions.

He was particularly adept at throwing deep, and Fuller was once again the main weapon. Fuller grabbed 62 passes for 1,258 yards and 14 touchdowns. Since Notre Dame is a very talented team at receiver and quarterback, the rushing game even improved its average to 207.9 yards per game.

Kizer was a threat to football, and with Fuller out there, there weren’t many defenses talented enough to hold Notre Dame down. CJ Procise’s running back also ran for 1,029 yards and 11 scores.

He was another distiller and one who achieved great success. Of all the teams that Coach Kelly resided on, the 2015 team is most similar to what LSU fans think of when they see their Tigers.

The Irish were packed with speed and playmakers at wide receivers and running back, so they used very wide receiver-heavy formations for much of the season.

Overall, the first six seasons under Coach Kelly saw a slow transition to a more explosive offensive once he got the talent on the list. Players like Eiftert, Wood and Fuller allowed Notre Dame to attack at certain moments and games.

With the wide receiver talent alone that LSU normally has, it’s hard not to imagine the Tigers making a very explosive passing game in a short amount of time.

Next: Part II looks at Power Football under Coach Kelly and the ability to shift the focus of the offense during a season.

Hasbro CEO Brian Goldner dies, days after stepping down for well being causes

Brian Goldner, Hasbro CEO

Adam Jeffery | CNBC

The toy maker Hasbro announced Tuesday that its Chief Executive Officer Brian Goldner has passed away. just two days after he was on sick leave.

Goldner, 58, has been CEO since 2008. He joined the company in 2000 and became Chairman of the Hasbro Board of Directors in 2015.

Rich Stoddart, most recently Lead Independent Director of Hasbro’s Board of Directors, was named interim CEO when Goldner went on medical leave.

“Brian has been the heart and soul of Hasbro since joining the company more than two decades ago,” Stoddart said in a statement. “As a charismatic and passionate leader in both the gaming and entertainment industries, Brian’s work brought joy and laughter to children and families around the world.”

Last August, Goldner announced that he had been receiving medical treatment for cancer since 2014.

While at Hasbro, he successfully expanded the business beyond toys and games to include television, films and digital games. Goldner’s tenure was marked by a focus on leveraging the company’s brands across the entertainment spectrum.

In 2019 he has pioneered the acquisition of Entertainment One by Hasbro for $ 3.8 billion, the Toronto-based studio best known for “Peppa Pig” and “PJ Masks”.

Goldner also served as a director on the board of ViacomCBS.

Read the full Hasbro press release here.

—CNBCs Sarah Whitten contributed to this reporting.

This is the latest news. Please check again for updates.

Boeing names former GE government Brian West as new chief monetary officer

A Boeing 737 MAX 10 airliner stops taxiing on the airline.

Stephen Brashear | Getty Images

Boeing named Brian West, a former executive at General electricsAviation as the new CFO after the current CFO announced his resignation earlier this year.

West will be tasked with leading Boeing out of the coronavirus crisis that is making the aircraft manufacturer one Record loss in 2020.

He replaces Greg Smith, who is retiring this month after serving since 2011. The company announced Smith’s resignation in April.

West is CFO of Refinitiv and was CFO of Nielsen. Boeing CEO Dave Calhoun is also one former GE manager and former CEO of Nielsen.

“I have had the pleasure of working with Brian before and he is an exceptional leader whose extensive operational expertise and commitment to stakeholder transparency will fuel our efforts while we continue to focus on safety and quality, our performance improve and transform our company. ” Future, “Calhoun said in a press release.

West begins his new role on August 27th.

Early on Wednesday, Boeing announced that Stayce Harris, a retired Air Force Lieutenant General, had been elected United Airlines Pilot with three decades of experience on the board. Boeing said she will serve on the aerospace safety and review committees.

“Boeing will benefit from General Harris’ extensive aerospace experience gained through decades of commercial aviation and a distinguished military career,” said David Calhoun.

She is the first black woman on the Boeing board of directors.

Goal CEO Brian Cornell says George Floyd’s homicide pushed him to take motion

Brian Cornell, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Target Corporation.

Anjali Sundaram | CNBC

When George Floyd was killed a year ago aim CEO Brian Cornell said he was rocked by the murder. He was concerned that it had happened so close to the company’s headquarters in his hometown.

“It could have been one of my Target team members,” he said, sharing his thoughts as he watched the video of Floyd taking his final breaths.

Cornell drew the curtain back on Tuesday on the Minneapolis-based retailer’s response to the murder and how it was led to step up its own corporate diversity and equity efforts. He spoke to in an extensive interview Ulta Beauty CEO Mary Dillon, which was hosted by the Economic Club of Chicago. The event, which was originally scheduled for last Tuesday, was postponed before the verdict in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin on the same day. Chauvin was found guilty in all three cases in the Floyd assassination.

As a young boy, Cornell grew up in a diverse neighborhood in Queens, New York and was raised by a single mother. As an adult, he and his family lived in Asia and Europe. These personal experiences inspired his respect for women as leaders and the importance of cultural diversity, he said.

Still, he said Floyd’s murder stood apart and forced him to do more.

“I realize that it is time to take it to another level and that we as CEOs need to be the leaders of the diversity and inclusion company,” he said. “We have to be the role models driving change and our voice is important. And we have to make sure that we represent our company principles, our values ​​and our corporate purpose in the topics that are important to our teams.”

In May of last year, in the days that followed, Cornell said Target had put together a special committee to review what steps the company could take to make its workforce, C-suite and business practices better reflect the diversity of the country. He said Target has considered how it can support and promote black workers, play a role in communities, and “use our voice at the national level in influencing citizen debates and policies.”

The goal is one of many companies that have committed to do more to promote racial justice After Floyd’s murder, protests erupted in major cities and around the world. Among its commitments, the big box retailer said it would increase the representation of black employees over the workforce by 20% in the next year. The company has developed a new program that allows black entrepreneurs to develop, test, and scale products to sell at mass retailers like Target. And it promised Spend more than $ 2 billion on black-owned businesses by 2025, from construction companies building or remodeling stores to advertising companies promoting their brand.

Cornell noted the diversity of Target’s 350,000+ employees, including the board of directors and the executive team. More than half of its 1,900 or so businesses are run by female directors and over a third by black people, Cornell said.

He said he wanted the retailer to be a leader and was particularly aware during the trial last week that “the eyes of America and the eyes of the world were on Minneapolis”.

“For so many of us, this judgment was a sign of progress, a sign of accountability, but also an acknowledgment that the work is just beginning,” he said.

A European-Type United Nations by Sandra Breka & Brian Finlay

For decades, multilateralism, based on a common overarching vision, has anchored the longest period of peace and stability in Europe. This alone should qualify the European Union as a model for the renewal of the United Nations.

BERLIN / WASHINGTON, DC – Last September, the General Assembly passed a to mark the 75th anniversary of the United Nations groundbreaking declaration Reaffirm the commitment to “mobilize resources” and “show unparalleled political will and leadership” to “secure the future we want”. The so-called UN75 declaration was an inspiring statement. But will it lead to significant changes?

  1. Getty / Bettman

History suggests it could be easy. After all, past anniversaries of the founding of the United Nations have brought about significant structural reforms. For example, on the 60th anniversary of the United Nations, the heads of state and government of the world established A peacebuilding commission to help countries make the transition from war to peace has expanded the human rights commission into a stronger human rights council and adopted the “Responsibility to Protect” doctrine to protect civilians in conflict areas.

The prospects of the UN75 declaration are further enhanced by the fact that it reflects the will of civil society. Before last year’s General Assembly, the United Nations launched a global survey to see what ordinary people care about. Of more than 1.3 million respondents, 87% said that international cooperation is critical to addressing today’s challenges.

The UN also supported more than 3,000 dialogues in 120 countries on “the future we want, the UN we need”. The results of these dialogues, which took place in “classrooms, meeting rooms, parliaments and community groups”, helped shape the declaration.

At the same time, national governments have worked to revive multilateral cooperation. Federal Foreign Minister Heiko Maas and French Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian announced the Alliance for Multilateralism Promote global cooperation in a time of resurgent nationalism. The alliance is now supported by more than 50 countries.

Similarly, last February, G7 leaders, including US President Joe Biden, proclaimed that they would work together to “make 2021 a turning point for multilateralism”. Working together to recover from the pandemic and “better rebuilding” were seen as a top priority.

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In particular, the countries also support the UN75 declaration. Two months after its unanimous approval, ten heads of state or government convened by Spain and Sweden published one Joint announcement Reaffirms its commitment to the Declaration and the ambition it embodies, and calls for reforms to the three main organs of the United Nations to create a “more agile, effective and accountable organization” capable of delivering “better” results.

All of these bode well for the future of multilateralism. However, turning words into actions is seldom easy, especially when it comes to so many actors with competing visions and interests. Given the nationalist and populist forces that are powerful in many parts of the world, the challenge ahead is all the greater. To do this, we should look to Europe.

The European Union has been a staunch advocate of multilateralism. In February, for example, the European Commission and the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell, issued a common communication to strengthen the EU’s contribution to rules-based multilateralism.

Likewise the Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron, President of the European Council Charles Micheland President of the European Commission Ursula von der Leyen joined the Secretary General of the United Nations Antonio Guterres and Senegalese President Macky sal in demand for one more inclusive multilateralism.

Europe’s leadership in this area makes sense. Although the EU is often classified as slow, risk averse and inflexible, it is characterized by its success in forging effective supranational policies and pooling resources to meet common challenges. The Europeans also particularly support international cooperation. In the UN survey, more than 90% of Europeans – a few percentage points above the global average – described international cooperation as “very important” or “essential”.

Building on Europe’s example of active multilateralism, our organizations, Robert Bosch Stiftung GmbH and the Stimson Center, along with other partners, recently brought together leading policy makers and experts from Europe and around the world to discuss how the UN75 Declaration will become a reality can. We identified several Key requirements.

For example, to ease pressure on the UN Security Council and the global humanitarian system, world leaders must take action to address the root causes of conflict. This means, for example, ensuring that basic social needs are met; Improving representation in politics; and strengthening national and regional government institutions.

Additionally, we need to address the “knowledge crisis” – including growing skepticism about science – that is undermining COVID-19 vaccination programs and climate mitigation efforts. This can be achieved through international and national campaigns that promote trust and combat disinformation.

A third need is to change the architecture and approach of global and regional financial institutions to fill gaps in digital participation, strengthen education, and make progress towards gender equality. Reforms of the legal and normative framework conditions are just as critical – in order to meet the challenges of today’s online and offline world.

Multilateral solutions can be difficult to develop, agree on and implement. This can make them appear inefficient and inefficient, with actors assuming they are better off doing it on their own. And yet, as Europe has shown time and again, the solutions forged from multilateral processes tend to be more inclusive, more effective and more lasting. Europe owes its longest period of peace and stability to these processes.

That alone should enable the EU to draw some valuable lessons for the renewal of the United Nations. An inclusive, adaptable and empowered UN, taking into account the EU’s experience, can provide a solid foundation for a rules-based international order that promotes global peace and stability while facilitating action to address common challenges. Such an institution could not be more worthy of our unwavering commitment and care.