Breaking down the 2021 holidays Dickens-style – Marin Unbiased Journal

Frankie Frost / IJ Archives

Jeff Burkhart

The drinks menu clacked in its printed edition, barely audible over the holiday music even though the holiday had come, and immediately caused problems. It said, “Tequila, soda, chilled, up.”

“What does that mean?” asked my co-bartender.

“What does that mean?” I asked the server.

“That’s what he said,” she replied.

The problem was twofold. Firstly, “up” means shaken with ice and then strained into a cocktail glass, and secondly, you never shake a drink with carbonated water as it loses its fizziness almost immediately.

“He says he gets it here all the time,” added the server.

I looked at the waiter and bartender and realized that the three of us had worked every shift in the restaurant. Everyone who walked through these doors came through us, so the chances that we had never heard of this drink were slim.

But there are still some people who yearn for the “customer is always right” restaurant business. This year’s Christmas celebrations have clearly shown that. The holidays are still amateur lessons, but luckily this year instead of the amateur lesson on steroids, it was amateur lesson on mute.

Technically, we’re in the middle of the 12 days of Christmas (even though it’s after New Year’s Eve) which means a Dickensian Christmas carol might still be appropriate. With that in mind, let’s break down the 2021 holidays in Dickens style.

• The Spirit of Jacob Marley:

Marley is Ebenezer Scrooge’s stingy partner, who warns him not to change his ways or risk wandering the spirit world shrouded in chains and lamenting his choices. Apparently, even in Victorian times, valuing money above people was a thing. The impetus for Scrooge’s nightly “ghostly” visits is that Scrooge does not want to give his employee Bob Cratchit off on paid Christmas days. One hundred and eighty years later, not much has changed. Nobody in the catering industry gets Christmas free, let alone paid. In fact, few people do this. So I ask you, are things getting better or worse?

• The spirit of the past Christmas season:

Remember a time when there was a serious impact if someone hit or pushed a flight attendant or service agent? It is now a weekly release. Where’s the outrage that sparked Zsa Zsa Gabor when she slapped a cop in Beverly Hills in 1989 after being pulled over for a routine traffic violation? Or the legal anger that was directed against Jim Morrison 20 years earlier when he was drunk on the way to a Rolling Stones concert and “disturbed a flight crew” and threatened him with up to 10 years in prison? I don’t know what’s happening these days, but it doesn’t seem to be getting any better.

• The spirit of the Christmas present:

According to the Associated Press, unemployment claims for the United States nationwide are just under 200,000 from 1.7 million in March last year, meaning 1.5 million people are no longer receiving benefits. Can we please stop hearing how unemployment insurance is fueling labor shortages? Every restaurant I know is still looking for people. Obviously something else is going on. Maybe people just don’t want to work for people like Scrooge anymore. Just a thought.

• The spirit of the Christmas future:

“Everywhere people confuse what they read in newspapers with news,” wrote journalist AJ Liebling. And that is even more true today. Everything has become famous. Instead of Julia Child we now have Gordon Ramsay, instead of Walter Cronkite we have Tucker Carlson. Bravery and loudness are a big part of the news these days, and it’s embarrassing to see it. Instead of real stories about real things, it’s all clickbait. Social media sites have made a lot of people think they are more important than anyone else. And once you think that, anything is possible.

However, there are still bright spots for the future. I applaud the man on this plane who confronted the so-called “Delta Karen” and received a slap in the face. (She was arrested.) We need more people like him.

Leave me with these thoughts:

• “The only thing we learn from history is that we do not learn anything from history,” wrote the German philosopher Georg Hegel.

• “Humanity was my business. The common good was my business; Charity, Compassion, Forbearance, Benevolence were all my business. The business of my trade was just a drop of water in the vast ocean of my business! ”Spoke the spirit of Jacob Marley, as it was written by Charles Dickens in” A Christmas Carol “.

• Saying “I come here all the time” sounds hollow to those who are actually always there.

• Let’s hope for a happy new year. I think we could all really use it now.

Jeff Burkhart is the author of Twenty Years Behind Bars: The Spirited Adventures of a Real Bartender, Vol. I and II“, The host of the Barfly podcast on iTunes and an award-winning bartender at a local restaurant. Follow him below jeffburkhart.net and contact him at jeffbarflyIJ@outlook.com

Robocop-style Covid bot ‘hunts down individuals breaking social distancing’

Robots are here to enforce Covid restrictions, they just don’t look like it yet (Shutterstock)

A new Robocop-style Covid bot is chasing people who break the rules of social distancing.

The surveillance robot could help contain the spread of the virus and also aid in contact tracing, scientists say.

They explained how the mobile robot recognizes people in crowds who do not adhere to the rules of distance, navigates to them and “encourages” them to break up.

The study’s lead author, Adarsh ​​Jagan Sathyamoorthy, said: “Previous research has shown that a minimum distance of two meters from others can reduce the spread of Covid-19.

“Technology-based methods – like strategies with WiFi and Bluetooth – promise to detect and prevent failures in social distancing.

“However, many of these approaches require the involvement of individuals or existing infrastructure, so robots have shown themselves to be a potential tool to address social distancing in crowds.”

Now, Mr. Sathyamoorthy and his colleagues have developed a new way of using an autonomous mobile robot for this purpose.


The robot detects non-compliance with social distancing and autonomously navigates to the static group with most of the people in it. The robot encourages the non-compliant pedestrians to move apart by displaying a message on the mounted screen. Credits: Sathyamoorthy et al. / SWNS)

He said the robot can detect violations and navigate to them with its own camera and sensor, and tap into an existing CCTV system if available.

Mr. Sathyamoorthy, a PhD student specializing in robotics, said, “As soon as it reaches the breach, the robot encourages people to move apart via text shown on a mounted display.

“The robot uses a novel system to divide people who have broken the rules of social distancing into different groups, prioritize them based on whether they are still or moving, and then navigate to them.”

He said the system uses a machine learning method known as deep reinforcement learning and Frozone, an algorithm previously developed by several of the same researchers to help robots navigate crowds.

The researchers tested their method by letting volunteers run through socially distant injury scenarios while they were standing still, walking, or moving irregularly.

Your robot was able to detect and fix most of the security breaches that had occurred, and CCTV improved its performance.


Young couple distance themselves on a park bench (Getty)

Brits have been asked to maintain social distancing to stop the spread of Covid (Getty Images)

Mr Sathyamoorthy said, “The robot also uses a thermal imaging camera that can detect people with a potential fever, which aids in contact tracing while including privacy and anonymization measures.”

He said more research is needed to validate and refine the system, such as studying how the presence of robots affects human behavior in crowds.

Mr. Sathyamoorthy added, “Many health care workers and security personnel have had to compromise their health to serve the public during the Covid-19 pandemic.

“The main goal of our work is to provide them with tools to serve their communities safely and efficiently.”

The results were published in the journal PLOS One.

MORE : The world’s first self-replicating “living” robots built by scientists

MORE : The tech company is paying you £ 150,000 to sell your identity to their robots

Jim Cramer says Common Electrical breaking apart into three firms is the appropriate transfer

CNBCs Jim Cramer cheered on Tuesday General electrics‘s plan to split into three separate companies focused on energy, aviation and healthcare.

While the possible breakup of the American industrial conglomerate may seem symbolically bleak, the Mad Money host said it was the right and necessary financial move and he trusts GE CEO Larry Culp to carry it out.

Culp, who acquired GE in 2018, “saved the company, and while we may miss the GE name, the divisions themselves were a house that, of course, couldn’t hold up,” Cramer said.

Cramer said Culp did an excellent job streamlining GE’s business structure and cleaning up its balance sheet after it was impacted by the financial crisis. However, Cramer said it made no sense to hold the remaining units together at this point.

“Let me put it this way: if you started a business today, you’d never start one that’s part aerospace, part health care, and part energy, including renewable energy,” said Cramer.

GE plans to outsource its healthcare business by early 2023 and its energy business by early 2024, according to a press release from the company. The current GE will be the aerospace-focused company.

Once that happens, Cramer said the standalone companies will be easier to deceive for Wall Street analysts and investors alike.

“Even at its peak, that combination hasn’t wowed anyone in twenty years so you had to do it,” said the former hedge fund manager, but suggested that as separate entities it could be a different story.

“A healthcare company based on high-demand MRI machines that they can’t even get enough of? That’s good, ”said Cramer. “The power and renewable energy business could be very attractive to asset managers looking to go green – and there are plenty of them.”

GE shares rose 2.65% Tuesday to close at $ 111.29 apiece. The stock is up almost 29% since the start of the year, outperforming the S&P 500It’s about 25% profit over the same range.

Phoenix boys shut out common season in fashion – Medford Information, Climate, Sports activities, Breaking Information

Pirates in fourth place defeated the Skyline Conference champion and third-placed Henley 2-0 to move into the playoffs of the states with a lot of momentum

PHOENIX – In the past few weeks, Phoenix head coach Chris Gallegos has been feeling better and better about the way his team plays.

The progress that the pirates have made could be seen on Monday evening.

In a fight between two of the top teams in Class 4A, the goals of the seniors Victor Martinez and Jorge Mejia in the second half as well as a strong defensive performance of No. 4 in Phoenix brought a 2-0 win against third-placed Henley in the final of the regular season for both teams at PT Rising Field.

“The way things went and things built up, we played better,” said Gallegos. “Everyone came together and it was building block, building block, building block.

“This is what we needed to prepare for the playoffs, so that’s what we set out to do. Henley is a phenomenal team, we knew it was going to be close so this will be the perfect game to help us get into the playoffs. “

When these two teams met for the first time on October 6th in Klamath Falls, Henley – who won the Skyline Conference title with a win over Klamath Union last Friday and snapped Phoenix’s five-year run at the top of the table – scored a 6-2. Victory, a game Gallegos knew things just totally got away from his team.

On Monday evening, however, things looked very different for the Pirates (12: 2, 8: 2 skyline).

Not only did Phoenix take the win and a bit of revenge on Henley (11-3-1, 9-1), the Pirates limited the Hornets to a total of eight shots throughout the game.

“We had to clean up a few things defensively,” said Gallegos. “As soon as we did that, it started to click. The guys start to click and they really just collapse. We are going in the right direction. … I have a great back line right now and they do a great job. Defense wins championships, and they do. Sergio (Alegria) showed a phenomenal game and really improved. He was just a great leader for us back there. “

The first half ended goalless, although Phoenix left Henley 9-3. The Pirates’ best chance in the first half had seven minutes before half-time when Cielo Marlia-Larsen sent a cross towards the rear post from the right. Caden Gallegos made the run into the 6-yard box, but his attempt to slip just failed.

The Pirates’ fate changed in less than six minutes in the second half when Martinez, reigning Skyline Player of the Year, attempted to split a pair of defenders right in the box. The center referee ruled that a foul had been committed, which gave Phoenix the penalty and a chance to get in front.

Martinez had no problems with that, sending Henley keeper Andrew Edwards in the wrong direction and sinking his shot into the net to the left. I

It was the first goal Henley – who entered the game on Monday night with a four-game winning streak – had allowed in a 3-2 loss to McLoughlin since October 9.

The Pirates doubled their lead in the 62nd minute, Martinez re-initiated the action that led to the goal. Martinez gave the defender a deft move, marking him as he spun with the ball, but saw his shot blocked. Before the ball could land, Caden Gallegos attempted a volley in the direction of the goal, but that too was blocked. The second ricochet landed at the feet of Mejia, who had time to control the ball at the back post and shoot it home to give Phoenix a 2-0 lead.

Less than three minutes later, Henley had his best chance of the evening, but Phoenix keeper Tucker Speaks’ double save – the first to come after a looping shot he dumped on the crossbar – kept the Hornets off the scoreboard.

It allowed Speaks and the rest of the Phoenix defense to post their fourth shutout in their last five games.

“We did a good job and much better than there,” said Alegria. “When we were over there, (the defenders) decided to move up because we weren’t scoring enough goals. We should have just stayed behind the whole time. … We really wanted (the shutout) because we gave everything. Mentally we weren’t there for the game that was played 6-2 (against Henley), but this is our home here and we did what we do at home – and that’s the win. “

Speaks, another of Phoenix’s nine seniors, finished with four saves while Edwards made five stops.

As a team, the Pirates outperformed the Hornets 17-8.

“The playoffs are just around the corner and we’re trying to get better, we’re trying to improve,” said Alegria. “We’re trying to win.”

girl

HENLEY 6, PHOENIX 2: At Klamath Falls, Phoenix fell behind early and was never able to recover in the final of the regular season against a Henley squad that finished second in the postseason.

After the Hornets (9-4, 7-3 Skyline) with goals in the 12th 20th minute after a pass from junior Sofia Rodriguez.

After a goal by Henley at the beginning of the second half, Phoenix senior Maddy Mayer hit with a PK after 46 minutes to reduce the Hornets’ lead to 4-2.

Junior Morgan James played well in midfield, winning 50/50 balls and creating opportunities for the Pirates in the transition period.

Reach reporter Danny Penza at 541-776-4469 or dpenza@rosebudmedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @penzatopaper.

Phoenix’s Caden Gallegos (2) hits Henley defenseman Eli Hayes to the ball in the first half of Monday night’s game. Photo by Denise Baratta

Phoenix’s Victor Martinez, right, hits Henley’s Trevor Tobiasson to the ball for a shot on goal in the first half of the game on Monday night. Photo by Denise Baratta

Victor Martinez shoots on goal under pressure from Henley’s Lello Squera in the first half of Monday night’s game. Photo by Denise Baratta

Phoenix’s Jenner Seldon (5) and Henley’s Jeshua Ruelas (17) will fight for first place at a loose ball in the first half of the game on Monday night. Photo by Denise Baratta

Native Palm Springs Bakery Whips Up Southern Fashion Desserts – NBC Palm Springs – Information, Climate, Visitors, Breaking Information

BabyGirls Soul Sweets is a local North Palm Springs bakery that makes southern-style desserts.

“We’ve been baking in the kitchen since we were little, since we could walk,” said Jamiah Hall.

Jamiah and Renaya Hall are the owners of the Soul Desserts Bakery.

“We’ve been doing this since childhood,” says Tanaya Hall, the girls’ mother. “You were in a family of cooks and bakers and now it feels really great because I can be less in the kitchen now.”

The 20- and 21-year-old sister duo started their bakery a year ago at the height of the pandemic, serving the Coachella Valley desserts that have been shared from one generation to the next.

“Recipes have been passed down – our grandma gave us recipes for her 7 up cake, peach cobbler … my grandma’s banana pudding,” said Jamiah Hall. “We started learning the recipes and then we were responsible for Thanksgiving and Christmas … then finally we (we) just made a business out of it.”

BabyGirls is not a traditional bakery. Inspired by family, love and Mediterranean home cooking, the sisters combine classics from the South such as pound cake and peach cobbler to offer customers the best of both worlds.

“If we bring that with us, they’ll say, ‘What is that? What is that? ‘”Said Jamiah Hall. “You’ve never seen the peach cobbler pound cake, so once you’ve taken a bite it’s like a little bit of everything.”

“They took these recipes and – not only took them, they perfected them.”

The Hall sisters said while tweaking the recipes to make them their own, one thing that will never change is the soul-inspired family traditions.

“Soul Satisfying Sweets – that’s our slogan,” said Jamiah Hall. “We always say ‘It’s soul candy’, soul food, comfort food. Food you’d see on Sunday after church at Thanksgiving or family dinners. “

The duo of sisters was a big dream for their small business in North Palm Springs.

“We want to open a food truck one day and have our own storefront,” said Jamiah Hall. “We also want some of our income to go to charitable organizations.”

They say they wouldn’t be where they are today without the support of the community and they hope they can represent the Coachella Valley well.

“We (hope) can make something of ourselves and make our name known to our community,” said Jamiah Hall.

The place is the cash for the NM United stadium going to come back from? – KRQE NEWS 13 – Breaking Information, Albuquerque Information, New Mexico Information, Climate, and Movies

Portales Football is ready for a full season in 2021

Sports / before 22 hours

Duke City Gladiators win on Sunday, November 71

Sports / before 22 hours

The Clovis Wildcats come in young and hungry ahead of the 2021 football season

Sports / before 22 hours

Paul Weir is enjoying his move to sporting director at ENMU

Sports / before 22 hours

Quinn Yost and Aiden Kraft qualify for the NB3 Junior Golf Championship on Saturday

Sport / 2 days ago

Andrew Erickson feels sane and confident entering the UNM football season

Sport / 2 days ago

Josh Kerr wins bronze medal and Courtney Frerichs contemplates winning the silver medal at the Tokyo Olympics

Sport / 2 days ago

Local soccer players drive the success at NMMI

Sport / 3 days ago

Andrea Howard returns from the Olympics full of memories

Sport / 4 days ago

The Lobo football autumn camp begins

Sport / 5 days ago

Artesia Bulldogs welcomes Jeremy Maupin. return

Sport / 5 days ago

Taylor Motter is Triple-A West Player of the Week

Sport / 7 days ago

Cash in Oregon politics as unchecked as ever – Medford Information, Climate, Sports activities, Breaking Information

The strongest belief that pulled me back into politics three years ago is this: We won’t make much headway to solving Oregon’s core problems until we drastically reduce the power of big money in Salem.

It wasn’t difficult for the voters to do. Donald Trump had a line of applause in 2016 that was true for everyone who heard it: the system is rigged.

I heard it over and over two years later on my own campaign path. Pretty much everyone I’ve spoken to, from left to right, nodded or shook hands as I put campaign finance reform high on my election agenda.

That momentum helped get me into the Senate and got President Peter Courtney to hand me the gavel of a brand new campaign finance committee. There we passed SJR 18, which referred measure 107 to the voters. It called on Oregonians to clarify the state’s constitutional language and let us know if they wanted to authorize state and local governments to regulate campaign funding.

What they – you – replied by a whopping 4-1 gap last November was YES.

Great – you gave us clear marching orders to take the campaign fund limit seriously.

I went to the 2021 session on SB 336, my proposal for Campaign Finance Reform (CFR), and two other lawmakers brought theirs. This would be the year for CFR in Oregon!

Well, today I sent out my newsletter at the end of the session with a summary of the legislative achievements. We actually did some valuable things; I’ll probably brag about a few when I campaign again. Missing from that list, and I mean nowhere in sight, CFR.

Our progress towards a transparent political system driven more by popular power than by great concentrated money has not advanced an inch.

Why? For starters, CFR isn’t a conversation that a lot of lawmakers like. Few would say the status quo is okay and most would welcome a change to get them out of the game of dollar advertising. But many get cold, if not offended, by a conversation that implies putting campaign money above principle.

Which I am not implying. I value the integrity of most of my coworkers, and the idea of ​​them being bought with burlap sacks of cash, perhaps with cartoon $ signs on the side, is completely wrong.

Large campaign contributions are less of a corruption and more of a distraction. They distract us from our duty to weigh the pros and cons of complex invoices in order to arrive at AYE or NAY. This is often a difficult task that requires all of our attention.

What does not help is a question that sometimes, perhaps unconsciously, comes to the mind of every public official I have met, however principally: “What will my major donors think of it?”

That is not a question that we want in the mix when the heads of state and government make voting decisions. I don’t know how often it changes voices, but I’m sure it postpones or dilutes bold solutions as these times require. When that happens, we fall further behind; The fundamental problems we face – the widening gap between rich and poor, the deterioration of natural systems, the cycles of crime and social dysfunction – are moving ever faster as our piecemeal solution is hampered by concerns about what big financiers are will think walking on tiptoe.

The solution to the distracting large donor question is not to wait for a change in human, in this case the legislature, nature. It is to make sure that there are no large donors.

SB 336 would do that, and I will bring it or a similar bill back for another round in the 2022 session. It does two things that CFR must do: exclude all distracting large donations from any person or group with a personal interest in how laws come out, and provide a structure that is simple enough for interested citizens to track the money. We have to do this; Renouncing CFR is tantamount to renouncing the promise of representative democracy.

But who will do it? Legislators, who started and won the campaign finance system we have now? Can we, who sit in the Senate and in the House of Representatives, seek serious reforms? Or do citizens have to take the reins in a CFR election initiative?

The 2022 meeting should answer that. Definitely count me in.

Senator Jeff Golden represents Medford, Ashland, Phoenix, Talent, Jacksonville, and the Applegate Valley. For a summary of the legislation passed at the 2021 meeting or details of current CFR proposals, contact him at sen.jeffgolden@oregonlegislature.gov

Breaking down the beautiful conclusion of ‘Mare of Easttown’ | Arts & Leisure

As HBO’s crime drama “Mare of Easttown” hit the zeitgeist in recent weeks, Los Angeles Times columnist and cultural critic Mary McNamara and employed writer Meredith Blake exchanged thoughts on Det’s death. Colin Zabel (Evan Peters) in episode five and theories about who killed Erin McMenamin (Cailee Spaeny) after the cliffhanger of episode six. Now that they have met via video conference from Los Angeles and New York to watch the much-anticipated finale together on Sunday, the couple collapses the series’ breathtaking conclusion.

Mary McNamara: I’m not going to say I told you, but I told you and I have the Slack news to prove it. We are sorry. I just had to say that.

I went into this finale with three expectations: The murder of Erin McMenamin would be solved. It wouldn’t be who we were led to believe it was (quite a neat trick given that so many characters had been portrayed as likely suspects over the course of the show). The reveal would take a lot of explanation and would likely force viewers to choose between the surprise and the show. So many series are so keen to get a shocking reveal that the final episode feels more like a narrative magic trick than an actual resolution of the events that preceded it.

Amazingly, this was not the case in “Mare of Easttown”. The show has played all along with the dangers of assuming familiarity equals understanding. Mare (Kate Winslet) is initially portrayed as the classic, down-to-earth policewoman, if not world-weary, then Easttown-weary: she thinks she knows what’s going on with Betty Carroll and her worries about a juvenile creeper; with Dawn’s (Enid Graham) missing daughter, whom Mare believes is dead; with Zabel’s abilities and feelings towards her; with her own mental health after her son’s suicide. Alongside her, we explored the endless list of possible suspects in Erin’s murder – her ex-boyfriend, his current girlfriend, Erin’s father, Mare’s ex-husband, the over-involved priest, and Billy as we made our way through the penultimate episode Ross (Robbie Tann) or John Ross (Joe Tippett) embark on the most menacing fishing expedition since Neri brought Fredo to Lake Tahoe.

Over and over again, Mare discovered that there were many things she did not know about the people she grew up with and the city she had never left, and over and over again she had to be reminded that she was not, “Mare.” of Easttown, “She was Det. Sgt. Mare Sheehan from Easttown.

To be honest, I’ve often only wished that Frances McDormand’s Marge Gunderson would show up to say, “I’m not sure I 100% agree with you on your policing there, Mare,” but then is Margege an incredibly high standard.

And Mare got there in the end. (Please note that I’ve given readers plenty of time to share so they don’t scream “spoilers”!)

The revelation that Ryan Ross (Cameron Mann) killed Erin was a plot that made both logistical and thematic sense. (It also requires Guy Pearce get a newly created Emmy for “The Most Effective Red Herring in a Limited Series or TV Movie.” Seriously? He was just there to date / sleep with Mare for a while?) Over the bonds between parents and children, how strong and how twisted they can become. While I wasn’t thrilled with Mare’s obvious twist on ending the showdown on the fishing trip so quickly – you and I were both wondering, “Um, we’re only five minutes in like this … obviously that’s not the answer” – me felt the episode regained its pace and gave us both a narrative surprise and an emotional conclusion. What did you think?

Meredith Blake: You can say, “I told you” because you actually told me! Perhaps you should take your resume to Easttown PD. I hear you are a detective. (Sorry too early?)

You’ve been calling it all along: it was Ryan, Lori’s son, and it turned out that the ferretic-looking intruder, Mare, was asked to do some research at the Carroll’s house as early as the first scene of the series.

On the other hand, I was wrong about John, and Richard in particular, and I owe an excuse to him and the struggling writers who have become the world’s creative writing professors: They are not psychopaths. At least not all of you.

Like you, Mare, I was ultimately impressed with how well Brad Ingelsby and Craig Zobel weathered the landing and sparked a surprise (or half-surprise) that didn’t just feel like a cheap gimmick – one the series arguably provided by providing The deal tied together many of the themes that seeped beneath the surface over the past six weeks, and most importantly, gave Julianne Nicholson and Kate Winslet an opportunity to really chew the scenery together.

If John had been the killer, as seemed to be the case about 2.5 seconds after this episode, then we’d have a very unsatisfactory turn – it wasn’t the one sketchy brother, it was the other! – an hour of airtime and a show that is mostly about creepy older men and the damage they do (although that’s still there). Instead, “Mare of Easttown” becomes a more complicated story about how our families and communities can both sustain and destroy us.

Ultimately, as you say, the show is so much about the bond between parents and their children. I would go a step further and say it is about the desperate and even self-destructive efforts people will make to protect their loved ones – or at least keep their families intact – and the fear and guilt of falling short come. Ryan steals Mr. Carroll’s gun and whips it at Erin to save his parents’ marriage. Then Lori lies to her best friend and drops her husband for murder to protect her son. We got a smaller taste of it when Mare was drugging Carrie, an act that may have been over the top but thematically coincident with the rest of the show.

I appreciated the elegant way the episode unfolded, with several softly played but powerful moments of emotional dissolution – particularly the “forgive yourself” scene between Mare and Helen – building up into the inevitable final twist and like Ingelsby’s Closed circle by bringing us back to Mr. Carroll’s house for the big reveal. (Here I am bragging about my vague assumption that the Rodent-Faced Intruder subplot would lead somewhere. Though I have to ask, does Ryan really look like a ferret?)

While I have a few more questions – just who was that Winston-smoking sneak who kidnapped all these girls? How do you say Erin’s last name again? Would Siobhan (Angourie Rice) have gotten into UC Berkeley from the state that easily? – The core secret has been solved. And on the one hand I found the solution … surprisingly satisfactory?

The-kid-did-it twist is possibly too much and I’m sure some will fight it, but it worked for me. Did you have any problems with that? Do you think viewers will be mad at the end of “Mare” like they were on “The Undoing”?

McNamara: I’d love to see the main characters from “Mare” and “The Undoing” side by side – Winslet definitely has the short end of the coat allowance. I think the ending was surprising enough and made enough narrative sense that everyone should be happy with it. Julianne Nicholson was just great at all of the extremely challenging scenes she had – the excruciating farewell scene with Ryan, the angry exchange with Mare, then her miraculous breakdown into a pieta pose with Mare. The show may belong to Winslet, but Nicholson owned the finals and if she doesn’t win an Emmy, Emmys makes no sense.

In many ways, “Mare” was a good old-fashioned “mansion” mystery, with an admirable number of diversions and subplots to keep the detectives busy and the audience wondering what was important and what wasn’t. The ease with which Siobhan slipped into Berkeley – as an out of state student! – not to mention the family’s ability to afford it (again as an out of state student!) was no doubt hotter than Inglesby intended (with the UC again promising to let more California kids in, the timing was pretty awful). I’ve often felt like Siobhan was on a completely different show, and I’m not sure what Mare is up to in terms of childcare after she’s gone, but her subplot, like Helen’s Manhattan parties, kept that from happening Show got too gloomy.

I wish we had followed the Winston-smoking rapist. In the end he was a lot more of a bad guy than poor old Ryan and everyone who stood in for him, although I appreciated the fact that no one called the shooting an “accident” and I hope it serves as a reminder to all handgun owners, to lock their weapons. I also feel like we never got a full picture of Erin, who had a lot of relationships with older men but somehow disappeared into the anonymity of the body in the library after the first episode.

What I love most is American television, which is adopting the British model of engaging A-listers in crime fiction. In the UK it feels like a condition of employment – if you become a famous actor, at some point in your career you will play a detective. I think “Mare” proves why that is; As crime fans know, you really can’t beat a good Whodunnit.

Blake: Oooh, I love the idea of ​​”Mare” as an American rust-belt version of a mansion mystery, only that it was instead of an 18th-century mansion (if you guessed it was Ryan in Brandywine Park with the antique Detective gun was, you win!) Speaking of which … I’ll say I was a little bothered by all of the stray guns loaded in this episode. They seemed crammed into every random tackle box and backyard shed in Easttown. I know it’s Pennsylvania, but come on!

But your take on the British TV model makes me wonder one thing: HBO has a track record of star-studded limited series that are ultimately not that limited. I’m sure, given its popularity, acclaim, and likely Emmy nominations, there is speculation about a possible successor to “Mare of Easttown”. And it seems like the door has stayed a little ajar. It’s about Mr. Winston Smoker and Mare’s not fully resolved relationship with Richard, who was quickly deposed to teach at Bates College. As Stephen King and Jessica Fletcher can both tell you, small town Maine is a great place for murder, intrigue, and tricky regional accents. Sign me up.

(c) 2021 the Los Angeles Times

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Sign up for our Kicks & Entertainment newsletter!

Get the latest local entertainment news, restaurant reviews and more straight to your inbox every Thursday.

JOIN NOW

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.

Breaking down the gorgeous conclusion of ‘Mare of Easttown’ | Arts & Leisure

The following contains major spoilers from the seventh and final episode of “Mare of Easttown”.

When HBO’s crime drama “Mare of Easttown” hit the zeitgeist in the past few weeks, columnist and cultural critic Mary McNamara and staffer Meredith Blake exchanged thoughts on Det’s death. Colin Zabel (Evan Peters) in Episode 5 and Theories About Who Killed Erin McMenamin (Cailee Spaeny) after the cliffhanger of Episode 6, the couple collapses the series’ breathtaking conclusion.

Mary McNamara: I’m not going to say I told you, but I told you and I have the Slack news to prove it. We are sorry. I just had to say that.

I went into this finale with three expectations: The murder of Erin McMenamin would be solved. It wouldn’t be who we were led to believe it was (quite a neat trick given that so many characters had been portrayed as likely suspects over the course of the show). The reveal would take a lot of explanation and would likely force viewers to choose between the surprise and the show. So many series are so keen to get a shocking reveal that the final episode feels more like a narrative magic trick than an actual resolution of the events that preceded it.

Amazingly, this was not the case in “Mare of Easttown”. The show has played all along with the dangers of assuming familiarity equals understanding. Mare (Kate Winslet) is initially portrayed as the classic, down-to-earth policewoman, if not world-weary, then Easttown-weary: she thinks she knows what’s going on with Betty Carroll and her worries about a juvenile creeper; with Dawn’s (Enid Graham) missing daughter, whom Mare believes is dead; with Zabel’s abilities and feelings towards her; with her own mental health after her son’s suicide. Alongside her, we explored the endless list of possible suspects in Erin’s murder – her ex-boyfriend, his current girlfriend, Erin’s father, Mare’s ex-husband, the over-involved priest, and Billy as we made our way through the penultimate episode Ross (Robbie Tann) or John Ross (Joe Tippett) embark on the most menacing fishing expedition since Neri brought Fredo to Lake Tahoe.

Time and again, Mare discovered that there were a lot of things she didn’t know about the people she grew up with and the city she’d never left, and again and again she had to be reminded that she wasn’t “Mare of Easttown ”. She was Det. Sgt. Mare Sheehan from Easttown.

To be honest, there have been many times when I’ve just wished Frances McDormand’s Marge Gunderson would show up and say, “I’m not sure I totally agree with you about your policing there, Mare,” but then it’s Marge an incredibly high standard.

And Mare got there in the end. (Please note that I’ve given readers enough time to get bail so they don’t yell, “Spoilers!”)

The revelation that Ryan Ross (Cameron Mann) killed Erin was a plot that made both logistical and thematic sense. (It also requires Guy Pearce get a newly created Emmy for “Most Effective Red Herring in a Limited Series or TV Movie.” Seriously? He was just there to cast a spell with Mare?) The show was about Family, about the bonds between parents and children, both how strong and how distorted they can become. While I wasn’t thrilled with the obvious twist tip from Mare who ended the showdown on the fishing trip so quickly – she and I both asked, “Um, we’re only five minutes in so … obviously this isn’t that Case Answer “- I felt the episode had regained its pace, giving us both narrative surprise and emotional closure. What did you think?

Meredith Blake: You can say, “I told you” because you actually told me! Perhaps you should take your resume to Easttown PD. I hear you are a detective. (Sorry too early?)

You’ve been calling it all along: it was Ryan, Lori’s son, and it turned out that the ferretic-looking intruder, Mare, was asked to do some research at the Carroll’s house as early as the first scene of the series.

On the other hand, I was wrong about John, and Richard in particular, and I owe an excuse to him and the struggling writers who have become the world’s creative writing professors: They are not psychopaths. At least not all of you.

Like you, Mare, I was ultimately impressed with how well Brad Ingelsby and Craig Zobel weathered the landing and sparked a surprise (or half-surprise) that didn’t just feel like a cheap gimmick – one the series arguably provided by providing The deal tied together many of the themes that seeped beneath the surface over the past six weeks, and most importantly, gave Julianne Nicholson and Kate Winslet an opportunity to really chew the scenery together.

If John had been the killer, as seemed to be the case about 2.5 seconds after this episode, then we’d have a very unsatisfactory turn – it wasn’t the one sketchy brother, it was the other! – an hour of airtime and a show that is mostly about creepy older men and the damage they do (although that’s still there). Instead, “Mare of Easttown” becomes a more complicated story about how our families and communities can both support and destroy us.

Ultimately, as you say, the show is so much about the bond between parents and their children. I would go a step further and say it is about the desperate and even self-destructive efforts people will make to protect their loved ones – or at least keep their families intact – and the fear and guilt of falling short come. Ryan steals Mr. Carroll’s gun and whips it at Erin to save his parents’ marriage. Then Lori lies to her best friend and drops her husband for murder to protect her son. We got a smaller taste of it when Mare was drugging Carrie, an act that may have been over the top but thematically coincident with the rest of the show.

I appreciated the elegant way the episode played out, with several softly played but powerful moments of emotional dissolution – particularly the “Forgive Yourself” scene between Mare and Helen – that led to the inevitable final twist, and like Ingelsby the Complete circle by bringing us back to Mr. Carroll’s house for the big reveal. (Here I am bragging about my vague assumption that the Rodent-Faced Intruder subplot would lead somewhere. Though I have to ask, does Ryan really look like a ferret?)

While I have a few more questions – just who was that Winston-smoking sneak who kidnapped all these girls? How do you say Erin’s last name again? Would Siobhan (Angourie Rice) have gotten into UC Berkeley from the state that easily? – The core secret has been solved. And on the one hand I found the solution … surprisingly satisfactory?

The-kid-did-it twist is possibly too much and I’m sure some will fight it, but it worked for me. Did you have any problems with that? Do you think viewers will be mad at the end of “Mare” like they did with “The Undoing”?

TV status symbol.

McNamara: I’d love to see the supporting characters from “Mare” and “The Undoing” side by side – Winslet definitely got the short end of the coat allowance. I think the ending was surprising enough and made enough narrative sense that everyone should be happy with it. Julianne Nicholson was just great at all of the extremely challenging scenes she had – the excruciating farewell scene with Ryan, the angry exchange with Mare, then her miraculous breakdown into a pieta pose with Mare. The show may belong to Winslet, but Nicholson owned the finals and if she doesn’t win an Emmy, Emmys makes no sense.

In many ways, “Mare” was a good old-fashioned “mansion” puzzle, with an admirable number of red pegs and subplots to keep the detectives busy and the audience wondering what was and what wasn’t. The ease with which Siobhan slipped into Berkeley – as an out of state student! – not to mention the family’s ability to afford it (again as an out of state student!) was no doubt hotter than Inglesby intended (with the UC again promising to let more California kids in, the timing was pretty awful). I’ve often felt like Siobhan was on a completely different show, and I’m not sure what Mare is up to in terms of childcare now that she’s gone, but her subplot, like Helen’s Manhattan parties, has the show kept from getting too gloomy.

I wish we had followed the Winston-smoking rapist. In the end, he was a lot more of a villain than poor old Ryan and everyone who covered for him, although I appreciated the fact that no one gently pedaled the shooting as an “accident” and I hope they are serves as an accident reminder to all handgun owners to lock up their guns. I also feel like we never got a full picture of Erin, who had a lot of relationships with older men but somehow disappeared into the anonymity of the body in the library after the first episode.

What I love most is American television, which is adopting the British model of engaging A-listers in crime fiction. In the UK it feels like a condition of employment – if you become a famous actor, at some point in your career you will play a detective. I think “Mare” proves why that is; As crime fans know, you really can’t beat a good Whodunnit.

Blake: Oooh, I love the idea of ​​”Mare” as an American Rust Belt version of a mansion mystery, only that instead of an 18th century estate, it was a split-level 1972 mansion in suburbs Philadelphia acts. (If you suspected it was Ryan in Brandywine Park with the antique detective gun, you win!) Speaking of which … I’ll say I was a little bothered by all of the stray guns loaded in this episode. They seemed crammed into every random tackle box and backyard shed in Easttown. I know it’s Pennsylvania, but come on!

But your take on the British TV model makes me wonder one thing: HBO has a track record of star-studded limited series that are ultimately not that limited. I’m sure there will be speculation about a possible sequel to “Mare of Easttown” given its popularity, recognition, and likely Emmy nominations. And it seems like the door has stayed a little ajar. It’s about Mr. Winston Smoker and Mare’s not fully resolved relationship with Richard, who was quickly deposed to teach at Bates College. As Stephen King and Jessica Fletcher can both tell you, small town Maine is a great place for murder, intrigue, and tricky regional accents. Sign me up.

© 2021 Los Angeles Times. Visit at latimes.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Sign up for our Kicks & Entertainment newsletter!

Get the latest local entertainment news, restaurant reviews and more straight to your inbox every Thursday.

JOIN NOW

Copyright 2021 Tribune Content Agency.

On The Cash: Breaking down Biden’s $1.8T American Households Plan | Powell voices confidence in Fed’s deal with on inflation | Wall Road basks in ‘Biden increase’

Have a nice Wednesday and welcome back to On The Money, where we prepare for something else shared session experience. I’m Sylvan Lane, and here’s your nightly guide to everything to do with your bills, bank account, and bottom line.

Do you see something that I missed? Let me know slane@thehill.com or tweet me @SylvanLane. And if you like your newsletter, you can subscribe to it here: https://bit.ly/1NxxW2N.

Write to us with tips, suggestions and news: slane@thehill.com, njagoda@thehill.com and nelis@thehill.com. Follow us on Twitter: @SylvanLane, @ NJagoda and @NivElis.

THE BIG DEAL – This is what Biden’s $ 1.8 billion plan for American families says: President BidenJoe BidenTulane adds Hunter Biden as a guest speaker on media polarization Trump on the resumption of MAGA rallies: report Biden’s inevitable foreign policy crisis MORE On Wednesday, the American Families Plan will be unveiled, an ambitious package that includes $ 1 trillion in new spending and $ 800 billion in tax credits aimed at increasing access to preschool and community colleges, as well as childcare and Extend health care significantly.

  • Biden will explain the proposal in a speech to a joint congressional session where he is expected to set his agenda for the coming months.
  • The centerpiece of the speech will be the Family Plan, which will be rolled out less than a month after Biden unveils a $ 2.3 trillion infrastructure proposal.

But we already have details of what Biden will propose tonight.

Education:

  • The American Families Plan has a $ 200 billion program that provides universal pre-kindergarten for all three- and four-year-olds.
  • $ 109 billion for a tuition-free community college for any American who wants it.
  • $ 85 billion to increase Pell grants for low-income and minority students.
  • More than $ 4 billion in major scholarships, certification, and support programs for teachers.

Tax credits:

  • The plan would build on the provisions of the American Rescue Plan by indefinitely extending the Affordable Care Act tax credits and making the extension of the childless worker tax credit permanent.
  • It would make the child tax credit permanent fully available to the families with the lowest incomes, while other aspects of credit expansion, such as increasing the loan amount, will expand through 2025.

The proposal includes the creation of a national program for paid family and sick leave, more funding for catering programs for children and low-income families, and reform of unemployment insurance. The Hill’s Brett Samuels and Morgan Chalfant break it open here.

The tax increases: All of these new investments will be accompanied by a number of proposed high income tax hikes which, on their own, could be a major political boost.

The Naomi Jagoda of the Hill leads us through Biden’s tax plan here.

Read more about the American Families Plan:

  • President Biden will speak to Congress on Wednesday evening tense terms with the business community for proposals to increase the corporate tax rate and nearly double the capital gains tax for high-income Americans.
  • Key Democratic lawmakers said Wednesday they would keep pushing for that full expansion The Presidential Tax Credit (CTC) is set to be permanent after President Biden released a proposal that would only cement part of the expansion.
  • The Treasury Department on Wednesday announced more details on President Biden’s proposal to increase IRS funding Strengthen compliance According to tax laws, these initiatives would generate net sales of $ 700 billion over a decade.

Run the day

Powell is confident the Fed can get inflation under control: Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Wednesday that rising inflation will offset itself as one-off, pandemic-related statistical quirks and supply chain disruptions subside.

During a press conference, Powell argued that the recent spike in the rate of price increases is almost entirely due to economic activity picking up after the collapse during the coronavirus recession outbreak.

“We’ll likely see some upward pressure on prices,” Powell said after the Fed announced that it would keep rates near zero percent and maintain the current rate of bond purchases in the reopening process. ”I Explain why here.

The background:

  • The US is expected to grow between 6 and 8 percent in 2021 as it contains the spread of COVID-19 and brings millions of people back to work.
  • Critics fear Biden’s recent $ 1.9 trillion in economic aid, plans for future spending, and loose monetary policy from the Fed will boost inflation as the US is already booming.
  • The consumer price index (CPI), a closely watched indicator of inflation, rose 2.6 percent between March 2020 and last month, and minus food and energy costs 1.7 percent.

However, Powell said Wednesday that summer inflation would continue to rise due to two short-term factors: The statistical effect of comparing a fall in demand with a sharp surge in demand and congestion caused by the reopening of the global economy.

“An episode of one-off price increases in the reopening of the economy is not the same as and is unlikely to result in sustained higher inflation year over year into the future,” he said.

TO TAP TOMORROW:

  • The Senate Banking Committee will hold a hearing on “The Dignity of Work” at 10 a.m.
  • The Senate Finance Committee holds a social security hearing at 10 a.m. during the COVID-19 pandemic
  • A House Financial Services subcommittee will hold a hearing at 12:00 noon to close the racial and gender wealth gaps
  • A House Ways and Means subcommittee will hold a hearing on infrastructure investments at 1:30 p.m.

GOOD TO KNOW

BITS AND PIECES