China critic Sen. Tommy Tuberville once more purchased Alibaba inventory, choices

Senator Tommy Tuberville, R-Ala., conducts a press briefing on the Senate subway to propose a vote today on the Jan. 6 commission and the Endless Frontier Act and the Innovation and Competition Act by June, Friday, May 28, 2021.

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Alabama Senator Tommy Tuberville, who is an outspoken critic of China and companies there, has been buying and selling shares and options in the Chinese e-commerce giant since last summer Alibaba after asking questions about similar transactions, reveal disclosure reports.

Tuberville made three separate purchases with his wife Suzanne Tuberville as recently as December Alibaba shares valued at up to $300,000 in total, according to a financial report filed Wednesday.

Republican spokeswoman in July told CNBC that in mid-2020 he ordered his financial advisors to sell a small stake in Alibaba stock after learning it was in his portfolio.

That earlier stock sale, worth less than $5,000, came as the former Auburn University football coach was running for the Senate seat.

Tuberville was exposed in July for violating a federal financial transparency law, the STOCK Act, by failing to file disclosures of about 130 stock and stock option trades from January 2021 to May 2021 within a 45-day period.

These trades included a sale of shares on January 25, 2021 put options Per Alibaba Group Holding Limited.

The sale of the put options – which would give their holders the right to sell Alibaba at a share price of $230 by Sept. 19 – was valued at $15,001 to $50,000.

That sale came months after the sale of Alibaba shares that its spokeswoman described.

His spokeswoman at the time said Tuberville wasn’t even aware of the deals because they were being handled by his financial advisors.

Earlier that same month, on July 14, Tuberville and his wife had jointly purchased between $15,001 and $50,000 worth of put options in Alibaba, while on the same day selling put options from the company at a slightly lower strike price, the were rated the same height.

Those transactions were only disclosed in a report Tuberville filed in August, after the news reported his violation of the Stock Corporation Act.

On September 13, Tuberville and his wife sold Alibaba options with an exercise price of $230 in four separate trades, and bought Alibaba put options with the same strike price, another disclosure shows. Overall, these transactions were valued at between approximately $80,000 and $215,000.

On Wednesday, the spokeswoman again referred to his financial advisors when asked about his together the account’s recent Alibaba stock purchases.

“Senator Tuberville has long had financial advisors actively managing his portfolio without his day-to-day involvement,” she said in an email.

Asked if Tuberville now plans to tell those advisors not to trade shares in Alibaba or other Chinese companies, given his criticism of China, the spokeswoman said, “Of course.”

In his financial disclosure filed on Wednesday, Tuberville said he and his wife bought between $50,001 and $100,000 worth of American Depositary shares in Alibaba Group Holding Limited on Dec. 14 through their joint account.

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The next day, according to the disclosure, the Tubervilles bought Alibaba shares valued in the same value range, which allows lawmakers to report transactions in ranges rather than exact amounts.

On Dec. 21, the Tuberville account bought between $15,001 and $50,000 worth of Alibaba stock, the disclosure said.

The pair then conducted a “partial” sale of Alibaba stock on Dec. 23, valued at $50,001 to $100,000, which the senator described on the form.

The congresstrading.com Twitter account, which tracks the Legislature’s disclosure documents, updated CNBC on Tuberville’s purchases of Alibaba stock.

Tuberville in June had lauded President Joe Biden for issuing an executive order that would allow the United States to issue a ban US investments in Chinese companies that the White House said would undermine the security or democratic values ​​of the US and its allies.

In a statement at the time, Tuberville said, “Chinese companies routinely violate U.S. sanctions laws and actively facilitate the Chinese Communist Party’s military expansion and persecution of religious minorities.”

In May, Tuberville introduced the China TSP Investment Ban Act, which would permanently ban federal retirement savings plans from investing in a Chinese company.

In addition to Alibaba trades, Tuberville and his wife also bought shares in last month Stratasys Ltd. with a value between 15,001 and 50,000 US dollars and a partial sale or the likef apple Shares valued at $50,001 to $100,000, according to the disclosure.

The couple also bought stock options for Invesco QQQ Trust, Series 1, and for Cleveland Cliffs, and options sold for PayPal and ChannelAdvisor Corp.

The Tuberville individual account bought a commodity futures contract for the delivery of cattle in April ranging from $1,001 to $15,000.

Cathie Wooden says Apple ought to’ve purchased Tesla, however ‘we’re completely happy they did not’

The closely watched finance manager Cathie Wood told CNBC on Wednesday that Apple could have owned the driverless vehicle market by buying it Tesla if they get the chance during the problematic start-up of the electric vehicle manufacturer Model 3.

“We’ve been watching Apple very closely for years. Because what is an autonomous vehicle? It’s the ultimate mobile device,” she said in a broader sense “Squawk Box” Interview in which she also talked about them Ark Invest strategies, the She expects returns long term and Purchase of Zoom after its recent decline.

Apple stocks All-time highs reached last Friday and then again on Monday – market value rose solidly above 2.5 trillion US dollars – afterwards Last week’s Bloomberg report about the tech giant accelerating efforts to introduce a self-driving vehicle. Apple was not immediately available to respond to CNBC’s request for comment on its autonomous ambitions. Tesla was also not immediately available to comment on Wood’s comments.

“It’s very hard work – and with all the turnover in management, we’d be surprised if they could do it that quickly,” Wood said, referring to Bloomberg report in June on the departures from Apple’s autonomous unit of three top managers. In 2018, Apple lured Doug Field, then Tesla’s senior vice president of engineering, back to the company he had previously worked for. Apple has also hired countless other former Tesla employees.

Wood – a longtime Tesla Uber bull and shareholder and supporter of the CEO Elon Musk – CNBC said, “This should have been Apple’s market. Apple should have bought Tesla when they were given the opportunity. We’re glad they didn’t. “

Musk revealed, in a December 2020 tweet for reaching out to Apple’s CEO Tim cook “During the darkest days for the Model 3 program” on the possibility of selling Tesla “(for 1/10 of our current value).” Musk said Cook refused to attend the meeting.

The first Model 3s, a lower-priced EV sedan for mass-market car buyers, shipped in 2017 after increasing production to meet demand was problematic. In 2018, Musk tweeted that the auto business was “Hell” and it was him Sleep in the factory to try to solve the problems.

Today, Tesla joined the $ 1 trillion market cap club, and Musk, the EV company’s largest shareholder, has sold billions of its stock holdings.

Wood told CNBC that she saw “nothing wrong” with Musk selling stocks, taking profits and paying billions of dollars in tax bills related to stock option subsidies.

Applications for admission Late Tuesday, Musk revealed he was exercising options to buy 2.15 million Tesla shares and selling 934,091 shares valued at just over $ 1 billion. Since his Twitter poll on November 6thWhen asked if he should sell shares, Musk dumped 9.2 million shares valued at $ 9.9 billion.

– Reuters contributed to this report.

What Might Be NYC’s Greatest Pizza Can’t Be Purchased With Cash, Solely Bartered For – NBC New York

According to some, it is perhaps the best pizza in New York City and definitely the hardest to come by. But it can’t be ordered or taken away from a restaurant – it can’t even be bought with money.

But the chef behind the raised panes accepts something as payment instead of cash: a foretaste of what his “customers” can do.

Making pizza was a pandemic survival tool for Gabrielle Lamonica. He wanted to open his own shop, but then COVID struck and put all his plans on hold.

“The only thing I could do was make pizza at home, which was the only thing that made me happy and got me going in the morning,” said Lamonica from his Harlem apartment.

He started to publish his heavenly homemade creations on Instagram – and then things really started to explode (watch the delicious video and you will understand why).

Soon people were asking about his cakes. But Lamonica wasn’t comfortable with it.

“I thought you know I feel really bad if I bill you for this. I’m not going to make any real money on it. So I still want you to try it. I really want to give you the pizza, it is my.” Pleasure, but give me something else back – any homemade meal, anything you can do well, “he said.

And so a system was born. Lamonica now makes a handful of Pizza Barters a week and like 60-70 in total, with each piece being unique.

But what is always the same is the light and fluffy dough. It becomes so by letting it sit for 96 hours, “in different forms, in different stages”.

The swap idea was inspired by his late grandmother in Italy, he said.

“She actually baked Brad every morning and traded it with the neighbor who had chickens so she could have eggs,” Lamonica said.

But not everyone they barter with is well versed in the kitchen, so they’ll take some other things with them as well.

“Sometimes people don’t know how to cook so they say to me, ‘Oh, can I give you a bottle of wine?’ I’m like yeah, sure, “he said with a laugh.

The exchange on Thursday evening took place in Columbus Circle. Lamonica made an eggplant parmigiana pizza, which he and David Weissman swapped for a homemade spicy rigatoni with Italian sausage.

“I’m excited. Ninety-six hours is a long time, it looks fantastic,” Weissman said. “I think it’s a great way to try new things and still be accountable.”

Lamonica spends about $ 20 per cake, and the cost adds up. But sharing your passion for pizza is priceless.

“I’m doing this so that more people, as many people as possible, will try my pizza,” he said.