Satellite tv for pc imagery firm Planet begins buying and selling on the NYSE

An image from one of the company’s satellites shows Lower Manhattan in New York City.

planet

Satellite imagery and data specialist planet began trading Wednesday on the New York Stock Exchange, becoming the latest space company to go public after closing a SPAC deal.

Planet trades under the ticker PL, with shares previously listed under the special purpose acquisition company dMY Technology Group IV. The company has about 190 satellites in orbit, and recently unveiled plans for a new line of satellites called Pelican to further bolster its fleet.

The stock rose 1% after opening at $ 11.25 a share.

Closing its merger nets Planet more than $ 590 million in gross proceeds, with capital from dMY as well as a PIPE round – or private investment in public equity – led by BlackRock and joined by Google, Cook, and Marc Benioff’s TIME Ventures.

Planet and dMY closed the merger with a 2% redemption ratio, which represents the percentage of shares that investors redeem prior to closing of an acquisition.

Cofounder and CEO Will Marshall

planet

Planet took the additional step of registering as a Public Benefit Corporation, or PBC, which requires the company have a specific purpose statement on how the for-profit entity is benefiting the public. Planet’s public benefit purpose is “to accelerate humanity to a more sustainable, secure and prosperous world by illuminating environmental and social change,” the company said.

The company’s imagery feeds into a data index that Planet says makes the Earth “searchable” for its more than 600 customers. Planet’s customer contracts are set up as subscriptions, with 90% of those recurring annual contracts. Its existing customers are largely split between four sectors – civil, agriculture, defense and intelligence, and mapping – and it generated $ 113 million in revenue last year.

Planet aims to be profitable on an adjusted EBITDA basis by early 2025, and grow its annual revenue to nearly $ 700 million by early 2026.

It joins a trend of space companies going public through SPAC deals, with Virgin Galactic the first of the recent generation in 2019. Several have closed and begun trading – including Astra, AST SpaceMobile, Rocket Lab, Spire Global, BlackSky, Momentus, and Redwire – with others having merger agreements in place – including Virgin Orbit , Satellogic, and Terran orbital.

Fashion notes: debut designs from Lia Cowan, Dior’s dreamy new retailer, and the ready begins for hero items

The introduction of a new award for aspiring fashion designers is welcome. Congratulations to Lia Cowan, winner of the first Longines Irish Champions Young Designer Award. The Dublin native studied sculpture at NCAD before earning a fashion qualification in Sallynoggin, and you can surely learn those sculpting skills in her love of manipulating and transforming fabrics.

ia uses quite a mix, from taffeta to cotton to silk dupion, like in the skirt below, which costs 350 euros. She explains how, as an artist and designer, she draws on her Jewish and Irish heritage and is inspired by it, “which has opened a portal in which threads of inspiration from folklore and mysticism are spun”.

Your “Forever Beyond the Limits of the World” Collection includes unique items.

What struck me in particular about this collection was its use of the yo-yo technique, which has its roots in Japan. Lia discovered it in a book about fabric manipulation, and it’s like a series of raised circles of fabric that she thinks resembles quilting.

The aim of the young designer is “to create carefully thought out and lovingly handcrafted works of art – heirlooms that can be passed on from one generation to the next”.

@i_am_liac; liacowandesign@gmail.com

Dior boutique arrives in town

Next week, the highly anticipated Dior boutique opens at Brown Thomas Dublin, the latest luxury designer to open on the ground floor of the Grafton Street store this season.

Here you will find the emblematic accessories from Dior, in particular scarves, belts and glasses from the “Cruise” collection 2022, designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri.

I suspect bag fans will be very interested, especially since this couture house’s iconic “Saddle” bag has been such a hit lately.

The Dior ‘Caro’ lambskin bag awaits you in the new boutique. This model is a tribute to Christian Dior’s sister Catherine, who was affectionately called “Caro” and a classic black. The chain links take up the “CD” signature, which reflects the clasp, and the “Caro” costs € 3,900.

The Cannage motif is inspired by the upholstery on the Napoleon III chairs that Christian Dior used in his first exhibitions in Paris. It is also very easy to recognize on the ‘Lady Dior’ bag designed by Gianfranco Ferré for Princess Diana.

In the entire range of handbags and accessories, I have a great preference for the Dior house motif “Oblique” designed by Marc Bohan.

Anyone who’s watched designer handbag sales before and during the lockdown can wholeheartedly expect a new zeal to be unleashed especially in the run-up to Christmas, and I suspect Dior will receive much of that love.

I base this forecast on the number of serious fashionistas who have come to Paris and London to see the exhibition. Christian Dior: designer of dreams.

The pioneering work of the couturier, his motifs and his legacy are of deep interest, which Chiuri cleverly reinterprets time and again.

The new boutique offers a selection of silk twill scarves from € 285, sunglasses from € 330, jewelry from € 350 for the embroidered bracelets by J’Adior and other jewelry creations by Victoire de Castellane, including the Rose des Vents collection with prices from € 1,000.

Cashmere indulgence

The mere mention of cashmere coated hot water bottles immediately caught my attention and I was in a flash at the Irish Design Shop on Drury Street to check them out.

The € 78 miniature hot water bottles are made by Ekotree im Burren from 100 pieces of hand-spun cashmere in delicious autumnal berry tones.
Jaffa orange and mint as well as beige and gray.

Check out the new Irish Vernacular 2022 calendar (€ 30) in the shop, a collaboration with Kenmare photographer Norman McCloskey. It features images of native architecture in beautiful natural landscapes and features 12 unique frame-ready prints, and the cover photo features copper foil details. irishdesignshop.com

Dates and days

Waiting lists for hero Christmas gifts are popping up everywhere. I’ve added myself to notification lists for concert tickets, restaurants, and pre-order services. I know it’s only mid-October, but as supply chains get active it’s a new retail reality.

There has been a lot of talk this week about the first-ever Brown Thomas luxury beauty advent calendar. It landed two days ago and costs € 295 while the content is estimated at € 690. There was a waiting list for the limited edition set, but it’s definitely worth checking in store for availability. Never ignore giftedness.

House firm Momentus MNTS begins buying and selling on Nasdaq after SPAC

Artist’s impression of a Momentus Vigoride transfer vehicle sending satellites in orbit.

Momentum

Space company Momentum Debuted on the Nasdaq on Friday, completing an almost year-long and turbulent merger process that resulted in a new CEO and the departure of the founders.

“In terms of value to investors, I think we are well positioned to meet some big market trends,” Momentus CEO John Rood, who led the company on Aug. 1, told CNBC. “There is a need for what we offer.”

Momentus stock fell as much as 9% in trading from its previous closing price of $ 10.97 per share.

The company has its this week Merger with Stable Road Capital, a Purpose Acquisition Company, or SPAC. A SPAC raises money from investors through an IPO and then uses the money to buy a private company and take it public.

Momentus’ path to the public market has been fought on several fronts, with missions now being postponed until mid-2022 at the earliest. National security concerns over Russian co-founders, former CEOs Mikhail Kokorich and Lev Khasis, led both of them to sell their stake – in exchange for “about $ 40 million,” Rood said – and leave the company.

Momentus’ valuation was then cut in half, from $ 1.1 billion to $ 567 million. And then, last month, the firm and Stable Road settled the Securities and Exchange Commission’s charges that the companies misled investors and falsified the results of a 2019 prototype test, paying about $ 8 million in civil fines.

The company expected to have $ 310 million on its books after the SPAC merger to grow, but the complications of the process reduced that cash to about $ 150 million “to fund our operations,” Rood said .

“We think that gives us enough runway to do our extra development work, add staff and some of the other things we need to do,” said Rood.

Rood described Momentus as an “early stage technology company” as it is now testing a new variant of its water-based plasma motors called the Microwave Electrothermal Thruster. The company told CNBC that the longest single fire on any of these engines took 9.7 hours in a vacuum chamber during ground tests, “significantly longer than what we would expect for a single fire in orbit.”

The thruster is critical to Momentus’ business plan, which involves launching satellites from rockets into specific orbits using a spacecraft called the Vigoride. Consisting of a frame, a thruster, solar panels, avionics, and a series of satellite booms, the spacecraft is specifically designed for satellites that carry large rockets, an increasingly popular industry practice called ride sharing.

The company had planned to launch its first Vigoride mission earlier this year, but ongoing national security reviews resulted in the spacecraft being removed from SpaceX carpool launches. The delay has also caused Momentus to lose customers and its backlog to drop from $ 90 million to $ 66 million.

Kokorich

The former CEO Kokorich did allegedly left the country, and did not resolve the SEC’s charges against him.

“We have no business relationships with Mikhail Kokorich or the other founders of the company. In fact, our national security agreement with the Department of Defense prohibits that,” said Rood.

When asked if Momentus or anyone on his team has been communicating with Kokorich since he left, Rood said the conversations weren’t professional or technological.

“If they are [talking to Kokorich]”It’s social and we need to keep a record of it,” said Rood.

looking ahead

Artist’s impression of a Momentus Vigoride transfer vehicle deploying a satellite in orbit.

Momentum

While Momentus has revised its financial guidance, the company still has an ambitious target of more than $ 2 billion.

The company expects to be profitable on an EBITDA basis by 2024, a goal that Momentus will have to fly 26 missions this year. Rood said that while Momentus works to address the Pentagon’s concerns and acquire a launch license, it has built two Vigoride starships and will work on more once testing is complete.

“We are in the process of assembling, testing and qualifying additional Vigoride vehicles,” said Rood.

Momentus’ early missions will serve as both tests of Vigoride and transportation of satellites from paying customers, he noted. The company is reducing its prices for these customers.

“We’re trying to make it more attractive to customers early on,” said Rood.

Another key to Momentus’ success is the availability and cost of launches, with the former steadily increasing and the latter decreasing in recent years – largely due to the ridesharing Elon Musk’s SpaceX offers on its Falcon 9 rockets.

“We have an agreement with SpaceX and are at a stage … where we can get the go-ahead from the federal government for our launch licenses, then we can book a manifest on a SpaceX rocket and go with them. Said Rood.

The partnership with SpaceX is “very valuable and something we value,” added Rood. But Momentus can’t rely on just one means of getting into space, so Vigoride is designed to be “launch vehicle independent,” Rood said, and “there are other vendors we speak to.”

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Missouri begins new fiscal 12 months with file sum of money – Missouri Legal professionals Media

Missouri’s new budget is off to a roaring start, with more money in the bank than ever before.

The state began its 2022 fiscal year July 1 with a general revenue cash balance of nearly $2.4 billion, the state budget office said Wednesday.

That shattered the old record of nearly $1.5 billion for the fiscal year that started in July 1998, though the old high mark was still slightly larger when viewed as a percentage of state revenue received at the time.

State Budget Director Dan Haug said Missouri’s large intake was due partly to the coronavirus. Because of the pandemic-induced recession, the state delayed last year’s deadline for individual income taxes until July 15, 2020, meaning it received two tax payments during the 2021 fiscal year.

Haug said income and sales taxes collections also fared significantly better than expected. The 6.7% sales tax growth indicates that people were shopping more during the pandemic, he said.

“Revenues were really, really good — much, much better than we did anticipate,” Haug said.

In December, state officials had forecast 14% growth for the 2021 fiscal year that ended June 30, Haug said. Instead, revenues grew by nearly 26%.

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Lynn Backyard mural begins to go up | Arts & Leisure

KINGSPORT – After two years of planning and hard work, a 100 foot long mural is hanging on the walls for the whole city to see.

With a grant from the City of Kingsport, the Lynn View Advisory Committee led efforts to create a mural on the exterior walls of the Lynn Garden Hardware building. Organizers say the mural was made to showcase the people, businesses, schools and churches of Lynn Garden.

On Saturday the mural began to rise.

“It tells a story that is both positive and true,” said Jim Wells, committee member and longtime Lynn Garden volunteer. “It projects realism, emotion and energy. … This will be the location for murals in the Tri-Cities. I think it’s so good. “

ABOUT THE MURAL

The 100 foot long mural depicts a brief history of the Lynn Garden community, including iconic imagery like the Lynn Garden restaurant, old Lynn View High School (and the Lynx mascot), the Optimist Club youth football league, a Pal’s Cup, model railways , a gold cross and seniors.

It will span two outside walls of the Lynn Garden Hardware building and will essentially take people to the “heart of Lynn Garden” – the Lynn View Community Center just up the street, Wells said.

The mural is not a mural in the traditional sense – where paint is applied directly to the walls. Rather, 40 separate pieces of Pellon, a fleece material, are hung on the walls of the building.

The painting took place in the Hardware Building last year, so people didn’t have to be in the elements to complete their work.

Joe Pilkenton, a digital artist and sculptor with the Kingsport Carousel Project, previously told The Times News that he designed the mural images on a computer and sent the file to a Philadelphia company who in turn did their outlines on the Pellon material printed.

Basically, the fabric resembles a huge “painting by numbers” mural.

FOR MORE INFORMATIONS

Wells said a number of volunteers had helped paint parts of the mural over the past year. He spent at least 1,500 hours on the project. In order to present the mural and deter vandals, a light was set up on a nearby mast that shines on the mural at night.

On a good day, Pilkenton said, volunteers can put four sections of the mural on the walls. Add two coats of sealer and a UV coating also need to be applied over the mural, and Pilkenton estimates all work will be completed in about three weeks.

And then the Lynn Garden Community can celebrate their mural.

If you want to see the work in progress, the mural is on the corner of Lynn Garden Drive and Walker Street.

Pepperdine Girls’s Tennis Begins Convention Play In Fashion ‹ Pepperdine Graphic

Sophomore Astrid Olsen prepares for a double game against Santa Clara on March 25th at the Ralphs-Straus Tennis Center. This was Olsen’s first game since February.

Photos by Ali Levens

The No. 7 The Pepperdine Women’s Tennis Team competed against Santa Clara in a WCC matchup on Friday March 25th at Ralphs-Straus Tennis center in Malibu. The Waves dominated the Broncos in a 7-0 game without dropping a set, and are now 11-2 on the season with a 2-0 conference record.

The match began with strong double performances by the Waves as duos in their sophomore year Lisa Zaar and No. 115 student in the first year Taisiya Pachkaleva and Redshirt newbie Lexi Ryngler and the second year Astrid Olsen Everyone won their games 6-2.

“Taisiya and I really enjoy playing doubles together and we cheer each other on,” said Zaar. “We have a lot of fun on the pitch and if we play well in doubles, that means our singles too.”

Ryngler and Olsen achieved an easy win despite a completely new competitive partnership.

“Astrid and I play together all the time in training, but we haven’t had a chance to play together in a match,” said Ryngler. “It was great to play with her and we were finally able to use our practice.”

Redshirt newcomer Lexi Ryngler scored a goal in her doubles on March 25th. Ryngler and partner Olsen won their doubles 6-2. Photo credit: Ali Levens

The waves continued to dominate in individual games No. 14th PhD student Jessica Failla continued her formidable game when she defeated Jenna Marie Gordon in two sets 6-0, 6-1. Failla was before No. 33 in the preseason survey.

PhD student Ashley Lahey, classified number 1 He didn’t play the Broncos last season and dropped out of the top 125 rankings due to a hand injury.

Zaar won their match 6-1, 6-0 shortly after Failla’s win to bring the Broncos to the brink of defeat.

“I want to build on the dynamic with which I win every point, game and set and I think that showed that I only lost one game today,” said Zaar. “It shows that I have a lot of focus that I was able to keep throughout the game, which I was excited about.”

PhD student Jessica Failla celebrates a point in her single game against Jenna Marie Gordon. Failla only lost one game during their single game against the Broncos. Photo credit: Ali Levens

Pachkaleva’s win gave the Waves the crucial point as they won their match 6-2, 6-2.

After the clinch, the Waves and Broncos continued to play doubles, and Olsen contributed 6-0, 6-4 to the team’s performance. It was the first time since February that Olsen had played in a match.

“I hadn’t played a single game so I got back into the groove every point,” said Olsen. “I had fun and I’m very grateful to be able to play in a time like this.”

Ryngler then won her match in fourth place 6: 3, 6: 1 and, as a newcomer, makes a strong impression in the line-up.

“I was focused on my match, but slowly I saw our girls leave the field and I was excited to see how well they did,” said Ryngler. “Seeing Lisa and Jess win so quickly definitely gave me a confidence boost so I just wanted to keep the momentum going.”

PhD student Shiori Fukuda won the last game of the day 7-5, 6-2.

The PhD student Shiori Fukuda will play in her single game against the Broncos on March 25th.  Fukuda's victory in the singles gave the Waves the decisive success.

The PhD student Shiori Fukuda will play in her single game against the Broncos on March 25th. Fukuda’s victory in the individual gave the Waves the decisive success. Photo credit: Ali Levens

The waves enter the heart of their season as WCC play continues and games against them continue for the next several weeks No. 35 Stanford on April 2 and No. 25 UC Berkeley April 4th.

“We are very excited to play against the best teams in the nation and we had great victories against them earlier this year,” said Zaar. “We like to play hard games and we want to find out how good we really are.”

Ryngler said she was looking forward to the challenge of playing top teams.

“We’re really excited to play against teams like Stanford and Berkeley again and everyone is looking forward to it,” said Ryngler. “We know how challenging it will be, but we’ve trained really hard and I know we can beat them again.”

Like her teammates, Olsen knows the team is training hard right now but is confident that it will pay off later.

“I think people got into this game a little more tired than usual: it’s just the training load we just put through,” said Olsen. “I have the feeling that we are prepared for whatever comes our way.”

____________________

Follow the graphic on Twitter: @ PeppGraphic

Email Justin Touhey: justin.touhey@pepperdine.edu

Keywords:
Astrid Olsen
student in the first year
Jessica Failla
lexi ryngler
Lisa Zaar
Malibu
Pepperdine graphic media
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Santa Clara Broncos
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King Road Cove Begins Providing Dwell Leisure at Decreased Capability | Enterprise

Publisher’s Note:The Chronicle is working to help local businesses suffering from the effects of the spread of the COVID-19 virus and related government orders to close or restrict trade. Each issue of The Chronicle and at will feature a feature on a local business chronline.com move forward. To be considered, send an email to the newsroom at news@chronline.com. In addition, The Chronicle will continue to offer its coverage of the coronavirus and its impact across the community, state, and nation outside of our paywall chronline.com.

After nearly a year of closure, the King Street Cove performance center in Centralia was alive last Thursday with the music of local musicians as the cove is 25% busy, according to state entertainment restrictions.

King Street Cove’s owner Jamie Kaiser bought the former synagogue, which was built in the 1930s, with the aim of restoring the old building and creating a place for local musicians to showcase their talents.

The entertainment venue provides musicians with a place to perform with quality sound and lighting equipment.

“My real passion is supporting musicians, so I do sound and light. They spend their entire lives sitting on the edge of the bed and practicing, and I believe my goal is to honor them for the practice and the dedication they have put in, “Kaiser said.

Renovations to the music venues were completed in late 2019 to early 2020, but the bay had to close shortly afterwards due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Last week we had about 22 people here and it was great … it’s kind of an open mic until we get some steam,” Kaiser said.

There are many professional musicians who have chosen King Street Cove because it’s a place that is much more conducive to live performance than a bar environment, Kaiser said.

“When you’re trying to sing a song that you wrote and there are darts and pool tables, people screaming and playing soccer games, we’re trying to create a nice music environment where people can sit back and enjoy and have a glass of it can wine, ”said Kaiser.

Kaiser is getting on the shows as COVID-19 restrictions allow and hopes to have live entertainment on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays and to show movies on Sundays.

There is no fee for the Thursday night shows, but there is a donation box to support the musicians.

Tickets will go on sale when the bay is full of concerts.

“I like it when people show their talents, whatever they are – poetry, reading or singing. We had people come and paint pictures while people sing, just to show their art, ”Kaiser said.

King Street Cove seats approximately 150 people upstairs at full capacity. There is also a cafe on the ground floor that serves drinks during the shows. The cafe will eventually serve food as COVID-19 restrictions relax and proper approvals from the Department of Health are sought.

Kaiser said the bay is always open to partnering with the Fox Theater for entertainment. The two venues joined forces late last year to host live streaming concerts in support of local entertainment professionals, but had to postpone the event due to stricter COVID-19 restrictions put in place in December.

Scott Stolarz, executive director of the Fox Theater, said the live streaming concerts will be postponed for some time in March.

“The aim of these live streaming concerts is to support the creative industries and give musicians the opportunity to perform and to supplement some of the loss of income from the shows that did not take place last year,” said Stolarz.

More information on the upcoming live streaming concerts will be announced early next week, Stolarz said. King Street Cove will continue to host open mic events on Thursday evening at 7 p.m. and will post announcements of additional events on their Facebook page @kingstreetcoveWA.

King Street Cove is located at 200 S. King St. in Centralia.

SDSU Extension to Host Cash Speak for Ladies; Program begins Jan. 25, 2021

According to Lorna Saboe-Wounded Head, resource management specialist at SDSU extension families, many women still shy away from talking about their specific, unique needs as they prepare for their financial future.

She says about the 700,000 jobs that have been lost since March due to the COVID-19 pandemic. 60% were lost to women.

To solve this problem, SDSU is hosting Extension Money Talk for Women, a six-week program for women to make safer financial decisions to improve long-term financial security. During the sessions, Saboe-Wounded Head will guide attendees through discussions about financial fundamentals, insurance, investing, retirement, and planning for future life events.

The program starts on January 25th and ends on March 5th. A hybrid format is used in which participants complete their tasks independently online and meet virtually with the group and the moderator once a week. Live online sessions are scheduled for Tuesday, February 2, 9, 16, and 23, and March 2, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. CST.

Participants will receive a copy of Money Talk: A Financial Guide for Women. The fee for the program is $ 50 but scholarships are available.

For information or to register, please visit SDSU Extension Event Site.