Arrest warrant issued for Walnut Creek Nordstrom flash mob-style theft suspect who posted bail

MARTINEZ, Calif. (KGO) – An arrest warrant has been issued for a Walnut Creek Nordstrom theft suspect who has already been arrested and released.

Dana Dawson left court two weeks ago and has not returned since.

CONNECTED: The Contra Costa Co. Sheriff’s Office is investigating why the Nordstrom theft suspect was released

Dawson is one of three suspects arrested by Walnut Creek Police in connection with the recent flash mob-style theft of Nordstrom. Walnut Creek police say they used a Glock 29 9mm pistol, a violation of their parole, only Walnut Creek police officers were unaware that Dawson was on parole when they arrested her.

“I don’t know if it was just a system error or just a delay in the transmission of information. We’re still looking into that, ”said Jamie Knox, police chief of Walnut Creek on December 1st.

Dawson was then entitled to bail.

ME-TEAM: Sheriff’s Office admits Walnut Creek Nordstrom theft suspect was mistakenly released

During their November 30 indictment, the Contra Costa County’s assistant district attorney said that Dawson’s parole officer attempted to get a parole warrant signed by a judge who would have taken Dawson back into custody, but the parole agent missed it by about 15 minutes according to Assistant District Attorney Jordan Sanders.

“It’s frustrating,” Sanders said on November 30th.

Without that parole warrant, it was Dawson’s turn to return to court, which the assistant prosecutor tells I-TEAM that they didn’t do on Friday or Monday.

CONNECTED: 3 arrested, gun found in a break-in at Walnut Creek Nordstrom store involving 80 people: Police

Parole has been actively trying to track her down and now has an arrest warrant.

The other two suspects arrested, Joshua Underwood and Rodney Robinson, appeared in court on Monday. Underwood had previously been mistakenly released by the Contra Costa County Sheriff’s Office, but was detained again when he appeared in court on November 30th.

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‘Any sum of money wouldn’t make the group protected’: Alleged shooter of 7-year-old Jaslyn Adams denied bail

CHICAGO – One of the suspected shooters, 7-year-old Jaslyn Adams, was denied bail Wednesday after being recently arrested by the FBI.

The judge cited a voluminous youth admitted for the accused shooter Devontay Anderson and concerns that he might leave town to deny bail.

Anderson was arrested by the FBI on Monday in Chicago, according to court records. He is the last murder suspect to be arrested.

Jaslyn Adams, 7

He is accused of using an AK-47 style and firing multiple shots at the vehicle Jaslyn Adams, 7, had with her father Jontae in a McDonald’s driveway on the West Side.

“Money wouldn’t make the community safe. Any amount of money wouldn’t make the community safe, ”the judge said when they refused Anderson’s bail.

The FBI initially listed a $ 10,000 reward for his prisoners and said he had ties to the Miami area. Last month, the reward was increased to $ 25,000.

It took nearly three months to track down Anderson after the first two suspects, Marion Lewis, 18) and Demond Goudy, 21, were arrested days after the shooting.

Goudy was taken into custody and charged with first degree murder charges and attempted murder charges. Prosecutors said Goudy allegedly jumped out the passenger seat and fired a .40-caliber firearm several times at the vehicle in which Adams and her father were located.

Authorities believe Lewis was driving the vehicle that Anderson and Goudy used to fire at Jaslyn and her father. The 18 year old has been charged in her murder. He was arrested on the Eisenhower after allegedly stealing a car, which resulted in his being shot by officers.

Jaslyn’s grandmother, Lawanda McMullen, was concerned that the police would not be able to track down her killers.

“When it first happened I thought she was another case on the shelf. But when they got the first two, I was pretty hopeful that they’d get the third, ”she said.

Anderson is due to appear in court on August 9th.

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Illinois turns into first state to finish cash bail as a part of large prison justice reform regulation

CHICAGO – Illinois paved the way for a major overhaul of its criminal justice system after Governor JB Pritzker passed new law that not only introduces major police reforms, but also makes the state the first in the nation to completely abolish bail.

House bill 3653The project, which has existed for several years, aims to fundamentally change the state’s existing policy in relation to policing and justice.

The legislation, which was signed on Monday, comes at a critical time as nationwide calls to tackle racial prejudice in the judicial system have increased following the assassination of George Floyd in police custody in Minneapolis in May, Pritzker said after the law was signed.

“This legislation is an essential step in reducing the systemic racism that plagues our communities, our state and our nation, and brings us closer to real security, fairness and justice,” he said. “All of this was fueled by the experiences of those who lived with police brutality and discrimination during this terrible year amid a brutal virus pandemic that disproportionately injured blacks and browns.”

The expansive bill came about through a massive mobilization of more than 100 grassroots reform organizations as well as the Illinois Legislative Black Caucus, which passed the bill through state legislature last month.

“History will judge how we responded at that moment, which required great, bold, and transformative changes,” said Democratic State Senator Elgie R. Sims Jr., who sponsored the bill. “This is not a moment of incrementalism, but a moment when we need to think about what public safety is like in this great state.”

One of the most notable facets of the law is that Abolition of the cash bail system under the Illinois Pretrial Fairness Act, which is part of HB 3653. The new law removes property-based incarceration and instead gives judges a more rigorous decision-making process based on a real risk of present threat or willful escape. This is slowly being rolled out as part of a two-year plan and will not come into full effect until 2023, while other parts of the law will come into effect as early as July.

The new system “increases law enforcement accountability and transparency, modernizes our bail and conviction systems, and provides better protection and more humane treatment for those arrested and charged with crime,” said Sims.

The law also covers some of most extensive police reformsThese include a requirement that all police officers wear body cameras by 2025, a ban on all law enforcement agencies, new guidelines for “decertifying” police officers, and nationwide standards and services for civil servants to receive regular confidential examinations and mental health assistance.

HB 3653 also prohibits police authorities from buying certain military equipment such as firearms and ammunition of .50 caliber or higher and armored vehicles.

Detainees’ rights have also been expanded to include three free phone calls within three hours of arriving at the police station and prior to the interview, as well as accessing the phone numbers on their cellphone’s contact list before inserting their inventory.

However, several law enforcement agencies and lawmakers opposed the legislation, arguing that the new law will not only do civil servants a disservice, but also harm public safety.

“The bill unfairly targets officials and seeks to punish them, not just hold them accountable,” said Ed Wojcicki, executive director of the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police, in one Explanation. “The public will learn more about these shortcomings when they see for themselves that the law removes the reasonable tools required by the police, prosecutors and the courts.”

The sentiment was vindicated by several Republican lawmakers, who said the bill was hastily rushed through a lame duck session.

“This 700-page proposal was rammed through in the middle of the night with only a few hours left in a lame duck meeting, without the transparency and discourse expected in a democratic process,” Senator John Curran said in a statement the Chicago Tribune.

Illinois Republican Party leader Don Tracy said the bill “deliberately undermines public safety – endangering citizens, encouraging criminals and making Illinois less safe for families.” WMAQ-NBC Chicago reported.

Despite the opposition, several community groups who worked on the bill say the bill culminated over several years and was a long time coming for the state’s color communities.

“The collective bill was developed in response to protests against Black Lives Matter that erupted in every corner of Illinois and across the country last summer following the police murders of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor,” the coalition to end Money Bond that strong the bill was involved for several years, said in one Explanation.

“The legislators saw the unprecedented protests as a mandate to fundamentally change the state’s criminal justice system. In signing this transformative piece of legislation, Governor Pritzker and the Illinois legislature took a bold step to advance racial justice in Illinois and to work with the millions of people who have taken to the streets to support the Black Lives Matter movement. “

Bail cash not required for star basketball recruit charged in lethal DUI crash

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) – Some harsh feelings are now mingling with grief following a high profile DUI crash that killed a Clark County school district employee and cast doubt on the future of a star basketball recruit.

The case has not been brought to justice, but the victim’s family say they are already being denied justice.

This story is the latest in our series of reports on what many consider to be an issue with bail bail hearings, and again shows that it’s a no-one wins issue.

RELATED: UNLV recruit Zaon Collins charged with DUI in fatal crash in West Las Vegas

“I think I’m still in shock because I still can’t get past December 30th. It’s like there wasn’t a New Year. There was nothing,” said Ann Marie Echevarria.

The last time she heard from her husband Eric, he went to get something to eat for her 14-year-old son, who shares his father’s name.

“And I called him and he doesn’t answer, so I called my son and I thought, Eric, where’s dad? And he said he wasn’t home yet. And I already knew he died. I knew it before I got to it. ” the scene. I knew it was him. “

The scene on the corner of Fort Apache Road and Furnace Gulf Avenue still shows the signs of the crash that killed Eric: broken pieces of plastic from a taillight, spray paint from the crash investigators marking the street, and wooden planks the one Cover the decimated ash block wall.

RELATED: Las Vegas Basketball Player Arrested Under House Arrest After Fatal Fall

“We live right at the end of the street. And … it was the worst,” said Ann Marie.

Eric Echevarria, 52, had worked as the Clark County School District administrator for nearly two decades, sometimes helping with autistic students.

He was a veteran, organ donor, beloved father, grandfather, and husband.

“I think when is he coming home? I look out the window all the time, looking all the time … Because his place is right in front of the house. I just look out there and the car isn’t there and it’s coming never go back, “said Ann Marie.

Your son, an eighth grader, has the hardest time.

“He wakes me up in the middle of the night which is heartbreaking to make me wonder mom what happens to me when you die?”

The teenager charged with the murder of Echevarria is 19-year-old Zaon Collins. The former Bishop Gorman High School student was a valued UNLV basketball recruit at the time.

In Collins’ arrest report, police say he drove about 88 mph in a residential area at 35 mph.

“When he hit him so hard, he got his car so far in the air that the roof of his car hit the wall,” said the victim’s sister-in-law, Evelyn Sulrzycki.

The arrest report states that police found a “glass with a green leafy substance” in Collins’ car and that Collins appeared to be tall.

The prosecutor says Collins tested positive for 3.0 nanograms per milliliter of THC – or marijuana – in his blood. Anything above 2.0 is considered impaired under Nevada law.

“He got high behind the wheel. Very high. And he decided to walk down this street,” said Ann Marie. “He turned off the road and hit my husband.”

Collins was charged with two crimes: DUI and reckless driving, both of which resulted in death.

Nevertheless, there is one thing Ann Marie cannot overcome. “He was home in less than 24 hours.”

Collins was released from prison the day after his arrest and was allowed to go home with his parents while his case is being heard in court.

“So it’s not fair. It’s just not fair!”

Collins received what was known as a self-recognition, or surgical release, which was not bailed but had several restrictions.

“What do you notice about this case?” Darcy Spears asked Lilia Ceballos, a bailiff who routinely works with DUI defendants.

“The fact that someone died,” replied Ceballos. “I was expecting half a million dollars bail to be honest. And surveillance! And when we saw he got OR we were like … What ?! How ?!”

The bail has been the subject of many screams across the country and here in Nevada.

“There were incredible racial and economic differences in bail application,” said David Chesnoff, Zaon Collins attorney.

Some crimes allow an administrative release in the context of legal proceedings.

However, this is not the case with DUI offenses.

“They don’t expect anyone to die so that someone can just be released,” said Ceballos.

District Attorney Steve Wolfson said his office had asked the court to place $ 150,000 bail on Zaon Collins.

In a March 2020 interview, Wolfson went harshly about driving under the influence.

“It’s a choice,” said Wolfson. “And you should face the consequences.”

Since defendants of DUI offenses are not entitled to release through pretrial services, they must appear in court.

Judge Joe Bonaventure made the decision to release Collins without bail.

“We depend on him as a citizen, and if he does not take everything into account – especially the family who has lost their loved one – there is no justice for me at the moment,” said Sulrzycki.

Attorney Chesnoff says the conditions for his client’s release are almost as strict as behind bars.

He is electronically monitored at a high level, must wear a SCRAM drug test patch and is not allowed to drive.

“Basically, the only difference between jail and whereabouts – and it’s good – he’s home and can work with me,” Chesnoff said.

“If you have clout, get out. And if you don’t, stay in jail,” said Ceballos.

“He was at Bishop Gorman – a fancy, expensive private school. He drove a $ 30,000 car. And now he has a very famous, expensive lawyer. How can we reconcile that?” Spears asked Chesnoff.

“Firstly, his parents love him and want him to go to the best school. And he led the school to three state championships as far as I know, so there are a lot of people who are glad he went there. Second, the car and third, his very expensive lawyer is doing this pro bono at this point, “said Chesnoff, which means he doesn’t charge the family for his services. “I understand what the deceased’s family feels like, but I also feel for a 19-year-old boy who has an incredible future that is now in danger.”

“He has to pay!” exclaimed Ann Marie. “And so that he is outside and glorified as a basketball player …!”

Collins’ driving record only stirs up anger for the Echevarria family.

“It’s very, very annoying that he was allowed to go home and my husband wasn’t allowed to go home. This wasn’t his first time.”

Not his first time accelerating. Or his second. In fact, Collins has four previous traffic incidents in the past three years. Two to go at least 20 miles per hour over the speed limit, one to be careful not to drive and one to go the wrong way on a one-way street.

“It concerns me that a judge could be induced to release someone with a story like this, whose actions killed someone!” said Ceballos.

Chesnoff counters: “I know a lot of teenagers who had bad driving records. So I’m not reducing that. It’s a fact to be decided here. But I also think that apart from the accident, a lot of teenagers had problems like this. “

Court records show Collins paid more than $ 2,000 in fines for his previous violations. He also had to attend a coroner’s visit program in 2019.

“And the victim’s family look at that and they clearly say it doesn’t matter. He didn’t learn from it. He kept doing it until he killed someone,” Spears told Chesnoff.

“At some point everything that needs to be said is said,” Chesnoff replied. “And I know it’s difficult, but everyone should be patient and move on to legal process.”

The Echevarria family so far say the legal process has failed.

“I hope when he comes back on February 17th I’ll be in the courtroom, I hope they lock him up! It has to be him – he can’t be home when he’s on his couch watching basketball videos when we.” are over there and don’t know what to do with ourselves! I’ve lost everything! Everything! ”Ann Marie exclaimed.

Zaon Collins is considering the mandatory prison sentence if convicted.

He is due for a preliminary hearing in court on February 17th.