KU college students discover fashion inspiration in popular culture | Arts & Tradition

Streaming services like Netflix and Hulu have enabled television and movie characters – new and old – to revive clothing styles and influence fashion trends.

Katie Dixon, senior business analytics and accounting major, said that movies and television have a huge impact on fashion trends.

“I remember when ‘Euphoria’ came out and everyone wanted to experiment with makeup,” said Dixon. “Or when I was in middle school, Pretty Little Liars was the greatest show and everyone wanted to dress like these girls.”

Middle school trends that Dixon is referring to include skinny jeans with wedges and large accessories.

However, some students feel that social media has a greater impact on influencing trends than television.

Lulu Stones, a senior strategic communications major of Raleigh, North Carolina, said that fashion on television had taken a back seat to influence trends. With social media platforms such as Youtube, Instagram and TikTok, Stones felt personally inspired by the apps.

“I think the more people stream, the less relevant fashion is on TV compared to what can be seen on social media and what influencers do on Instagram, Pinterest, [and] TikTok, ”said Stones. “During the quarantine, I was definitely heavily influenced by TikTok style trends.”

The trends she is referring to are oversized button-ups, sweater vests, and skater skirts, Stones said.

While she doesn’t believe that television has the greatest influence on current styles, Stones recognizes that television has some influence on trends. Shows like “Outer Banks” and the HBO Max reboot of “Gossip Girl” have sparked an influx of new trends, Stones said.

“The release of the new ‘Gossip Girl’ was in vogue around the same time [Tik]Tok exploded with preppy street styles like oversized button-ups, sweater vests and skater skirts, ”said Stones.

Although various media outlets have taken over the fashion influences, iconic characters and their style choices continue to dominate the clothes people buy, like that a report from Lyst. Shows like “Emily in Paris” and “Normal People” have been featured as the top two fashion influences on the silver screen of 2020.

Films like “The Devil Wears Prada” changed Dixon’s view of the fashion industry.

“I was in my uncomfortable teenage years where I still didn’t know how to dress or what to and shouldn’t wear,” said Dixon. “I remember sitting in the living room with my mom and watching this movie and how much I was involved with Anne Hathaway’s character. At that time I didn’t care how I look and just put on clean clothes. “

It was the iconic Meryl Streep monologue that shamed Hathaway’s sky blue sweater, which emphasized the importance of fashion to Dixon and showed her how powerful the fashion industry can be.

“Describes that clothes are not ‘just stuff’, that they are jobs and millions of dollars that go into just one color, that the fashion industry is not just about clothes, but the meaning behind it and the work [that] was only used to make a piece, ”said Dixon.

Dixon said she has begun relativizing her own style choices and discovering a new appreciation for what the industry has to offer.

As for Stones, she believes relatable movie and television characters can influence personal style.

“At some point, when you get into the character, you get to know the celebrity in their real life and look up to them and know that if they can play great roles in movies and TV, they can have a cool or interesting real life, and you pay attention to details, ”said Stones. “That’s what stays in your mind, and that’s what you look for, after all [in] yourself.”

Although her style has changed, Stones feels that her personal style has taken on fewer rules as she is more exposed to trends from the media.

“My view of fashion was less about sticking to a certain style and just letting me buy things that catch my eye or things that I like, whether it’s preppy, boho, chic, [or] sporty, ”said Stones.

Similarly, Dixon said her fashion developed beyond the characters she used to idolize in television and film.

“It’s funny looking back at the movies I’ve watched religiously and trying to imagine how I’m wearing this stuff now,” said Dixon. “I think at that time it was a lot easier to reflect on what the TV shows and movies attract their characters. Now I think the industry has changed so much that there are so many different trends to follow.”

Regardless, Dixon believes the impact that characters and on-screen shows have had on the fashion industry is undeniable.

“If you are to be successful in the industry, you have to keep up with what affects everyone most,” said Dixon. “Sometimes it can be a trend that lasts for a week while others can last for months.”

Up to date Arts And Crafts-Model House In DC’s Takoma Neighborhood

GEORGETOWN, DC – Here is a rare opportunity to own a historic, one-of-a-kind arts and crafts home in the Takoma neighborhood of DC

The house offers a perfect mix of original features from the 1920s and modern updates: wraparound stone veranda, spacious rooms with original hardwood floors, stone fireplace, a large kitchen of the chef and a dining room with bay window. The ground floor also has a powder room and a separate mudroom.

Located in the historic Takoma Park District, the home is just 3 blocks from the Takoma Park Subway and steps away from all that downtown Takoma Park has to offer: farmers market, neighborhood restaurants, and charming shops.

(Red fin)

  • Address: 7223 Blair Road NW, Washington, DC
  • Price: $ 1,300,000
  • Square Feet: 2,554
  • Bedroom: 4
  • Bathroom: 3.5
  • Listing Description: The second floor of this DC home has a spacious master bedroom suite with a sitting area, lovely bathroom with double vanity and a walk-in closet. There are two further spacious bedrooms and a hall bathroom with double vanity. The finished attic is huge and completely open, with space for the bedroom, office, playroom or whatever your heart desires. The lower level is completely finished and also has an open floor plan with a family room, full bath, laundry room, and plenty of storage space. The house has a 2 car garage, parking space and driveway.

(Red fin)

This offer appeared on redfin.com. For more information and photos, Click here.

New arts present raises cash for Shelby County Animal Shelter | Neighborhood

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – A new festival was held in Shelbyville this weekend to raise money for pets in need.

The Shelbyville Fall Art and Craft Show featured more than 80 vendors, food trucks, a petting zoo, and face painting over Labor Day weekend.

ArtSpark Productions’ Sherry Kremer says the first-time event was so successful that some vendors ran out of products on the first day.

Kremer used to work in tourism and wanted to develop a show that promotes regional companies – but not only regional companies benefited from the show.

“I wanted to create an event that would help the vendors, artisans and artists, and also benefit a local charity, so we chose Shelby County Animal Rescue,” said Kremer.

A number of raffles and promotions were also offered during the weekend to raise funds for the shelter.

Copyright 2021 WDRB-Medien. All rights reserved.

For subscribers: Proposal goals to spend tens of millions in San Diego arts cash extra broadly, extra pretty

San Diego officials are proposing big changes to the way the city spends millions in art funding after a recent equity assessment showed low-income neighborhoods earn far less than Balboa Park, downtown, and La Jolla.

The proposal would increase eligibility in several ways, make the process more transparent and ease the audit requirements for small organizations. It would also remove the city’s “refund only” policy so that some art events could be funded upfront.

Eligibility would extend beyond nonprofits to individual artists and campaigns targeting goals such as promoting the inclusion of underrepresented groups.

City officials said the main goal of the revised guidelines is to expand the preservation of city arts funding and strengthen the city’s creative industries by better encouraging the growth of young artists and arts organizations.

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“There are so many young and new organizations out there eager to get funding to get started,” said Theresa Kosen, co-chair of the San Diego Regional Arts and Culture Coalition. “It will provide impact and justice.”

Many small organizations do not apply for city funding because they cannot afford to meet city requirements for extensive audits, or because they do not have enough capital to prepay an event and then spend months on city reimbursement wait .

The proposal would also cut the time a recipient must have been or worked in the arts to qualify for a grant from three to two years, which city officials say is more in line with other government agencies that support the arts.

Heads of local arts organizations praise the proposed changes, which the city council is expected to consider this fall.

Thus, by giving money to more groups and shifting some of the money to smaller groups, the proposal would reduce funding for many other arts organizations, most likely larger and long-standing groups that benefit from the existing system.

That’s because the proposal doesn’t include a general increase in city arts funding, which is typically anywhere from $ 8 million to $ 12 million annually.

However, there doesn’t seem to be an immediate backlash from the city’s most prominent arts organizations.

Peter Comiskey, Executive Director of the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership with 26 organizations, praised the changes as an important step in improving opportunities for those who currently do not have access to city funds.

One way the proposal would likely increase the size of the funding pool is to ban organizations outside of the city from receiving city grants for day-to-day operations.

That change would immediately affect half a dozen arts organizations in Chula Vista, Lemon Grove, and Poway that are receiving money from San Diego for showing more than half of the people attending their events live in San Diego.

These groups could still apply for grants to fund events, but those events would have to be within the city of San Diego. And they could no longer apply for money for ongoing operations.

The proposed revisions come in response to an equity assessment that showed Balboa Park and downtown received nearly 70 percent of the $ 11.4 million the city donated to arts organizations in both fiscal years 2019 and 2020.

The analysis showed that District 3, which includes Balboa Park, downtown, and the surrounding areas, received more than 200 times as much annual arts funding as District 8, which includes San Ysidro and Barrio Logan.

But the differences go beyond that.

Districts 1 and 2 – which are more affluent and ethnically less diverse than most other parts of the city – also received far more than any other place except District 3.

District 1, which includes La Jolla and its numerous theater and arts programs, received $ 1.42 million in fiscal year 2019 and $ 1.22 million in fiscal year 2020. District 2, which includes the Liberty Station arts district, received just over $ 1 million in fiscal 2019 and $ 904,000 in fiscal 2020.

If the art funding of districts 1, 2 and 3 for the 2020 financial year is added together, it makes up 87.3 percent of the total city art funding. In the 2019 financial year, this proportion was even higher at 91.4 percent.

Meanwhile, District 8 received $ 35,000 in fiscal 2020 and $ 25,000 in fiscal 2019. District 4, which includes much of southeastern San Diego, received $ 130,000 in fiscal 2020 and US $ 145,000 in fiscal 2019 -Dollar.

Almost all cities divert significant resources to large venues such as the San Diego Civic Theater and Balboa Park institutions as they are designed to serve an entire region. However, some critics question the possibility that San Diego is spending too much money on these types of venues.

City council member Vivian Moreno, who represents District 8, is one of those critics. Last spring, she called equity valuation a call to action.

Moreno this week praised the proposed revisions made by the city’s Arts and Culture Commission after many months of analyzing and collecting community feedback.

“This will make it easier for arts organizations of all sizes to benefit from city funding,” Moreno said Wednesday during a meeting of the council’s economic development committee. “We are taking the necessary steps to support inclusive growth and development.”

Councilor Sean Elo-Rivera said the proposal could be a model for how San Diego officials can change city policies to increase equity in other areas.

“A world-class city requires a world-class art community, and I think we have what it takes here,” said Elo-Rivera. “It’s about giving this talent the opportunity to breathe and realize its potential. That is definitely a step in that direction. “

Bea Zamora Aguilar, director of an Aztec dance group in Barrio Logan, said this week that she was particularly optimistic about the proposal to soften audit requirements and abolish the exclusive reimbursement policy.

She said most small arts organizations couldn’t afford a full audit. When making the refund, she found that she was still waiting for a $ 5,000 scholarship she had received for a photo exhibition that had already opened and closed.

Aguilar said she would have to carefully consider the proposal before she could declare her full support, but was optimistic.

“It sounds like it really is a step in the right direction,” she said. “As a small business, it is difficult to get visibility into your programming, so we all need the help.”

For audit organizations receiving grants, the proposal would create a medium level of disclosure. Large organizations receiving larger grants would still have to conduct audits. But groups with operating budgets less than $ 2 million and receiving grants of $ 75,000 or less could file a less stringent financial audit instead of an audit.

If the council approves the policy changes this fall, they will be used for arts grants in the new city budget, which will be approved next June.

Colorado Springs fireworks: The right way to watch, what to know | Arts & Leisure

Fireworks will be launched on your porch tonight from multiple locations in the Pikes Peak area for the July 4th Symphony. The event returns this year in place of the fireworks in Memorial Park. Here’s what you should know.

Where can I see fireworks tonight?

People are encouraged to see the displays from their homes. Fireworks are set off in the following locations:

  • The Broadmoor
  • Cherokee Ridge Golf Course
  • The club at Flying Horse
  • The Colorado Country Club at Cheyenne Mountain Resort
  • Falcon Freedom Days at Meridian Ranch
  • Garden of the Gods Resort and Club
  • Patty Jewett Golf Course.



Karte_4th-of-Juli_FINAL-1.jpeg

Fireworks are also hosted by Colorado Springs Switchbacks FC and Rocky Mountain Vibes via tickets with admission tickets.

You can also watch the show live on KKTV.com or on the KKTV Facebook page.

When do the fireworks start tonight?

The show starts at 9:20 pm

How do I listen to the Colorado Springs Philharmonic?

Switch on one of the following channels for the live broadcast from 9 p.m.

Sunny 106.3 FM; Y96.9 FM ; KCME 88.7 FM; AM 740 KVOR; 92.9 FM peak

Colorado Springs will get one other style of Jamaica | Desk Discuss | Arts & Leisure

Everton Cameron, owner of High Grade Foods, has been running his hugely successful food truck since 2013 when there were only a few mobile food companies roaming around town. On May 28th, he opened a restaurant with seating at 1020 S. Tejon St., but not without major delays.

“Yeah, it took about three and a half years,” he said. “There were construction delays and then the pandemic.”

The good news is that it is open and serves some of the tastiest Jamaican dishes we’ve been immersed in for a while. Cameron’s culinary talent, honed in upscale Jamaican hotels and resorts, shines in his new restaurant. For example, the Jamaican beef patty with coconut bread ($ 8) that we enjoyed for lunch. This tasty Jamaican staple is made from ground beef flavored with curry powder and chillies. Cameron covers the patty with a puff pastry before deep-frying it. Then he folds the patty into his handmade, deliciously soft coconut bread.

Next up, we have the Jerk Barbecue Pork Ribs ($ 15) with Baked Mac and Cheese ($ 7) and Sub Shrimp Curry with Coconut Rice ($ 18) for the braised oxtails we ordered.

Colorado Springs with new restaurants on Pikes Peak

While the oxtails got stuck in the kitchen, we were more than happy with the piping hot food that came on our table. The ribs were juicy and tender with a perfectly flavorful jerk seasoning and sticky barbecue sauce. The baked mac and cheese alone is worth visiting again. The curry prawns were spot on too. The coconut rice was wonderfully soaked in the spicy curry sauce.

Lunch prices are reasonable for the large portions (we brought to-go boxes). We were told that the dinner prices are a little higher but the portions are bigger. There’s a full bar with nods to Jamaican rums and of course Red Line beer is on offer.

“I’m looking for a bartender who can make fun cocktails,” says Cameron. “I will also add other dishes to the menu.”

The opening times are Wednesday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Details: 930-3843, facebook.com/HighGradeFoods.



Colorado Springs gets a different taste from Jamaica

Stunning new mural at Crave Real Burgers.


Refreshes desire

Crave Real Burgers, 7465 N. Academy Blvd., was closed for a few days in January to complete a remodeling project. When it reopened, guests were greeted with a new vibrant mural, bright orange furniture, a row of tall communal tables, and an updated menu.

“Given the closure, we decided to take some time to update the Colorado Springs store,” said Jeff Richard, head chef and owner. “I’m really excited about the mural and the new arrangement of the furniture gives us more seating.”

The long-awaited, redesigned Colorado Springs restaurant is about to open

New menu items included the pound beef Texas burger with a smoked brisket, coleslaw, jalapeño bottle caps (fried pepper slices), and homemade barbecue sauce. “It’s very popular and we bring it back from time to time,” he said. “And we’ve added Drunken Apple Pie Shake to the menu. It’s an ice shake with caramel, apple pie and bourbon. “

The opening times are Monday to Thursday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 9:30 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. Details: 264-7919, tinyurl.com/wc99fj7k



Colorado Springs gets a different taste from Jamaica

Dan MacDonald, owner of Colorado BBQ Outfitters, hosts the new radio show Easy Does it BBQ.


New radio broadcast

Grill fans, this show is for you: Easy Does It BBQ.

The 30-minute radio show is hosted by Dan MacDonald, owner of Colorado BBQ Outfitters, 5921 N. Academy Blvd., and airs Saturdays on KPPF 1040 AM, 95.7 FM and 98.5 FM at 1:00 PM. Find previous shows on the YouTube channel.

Colorado Springs gets new Detroit-style pizzeria

Drinking wine in the park

The Manitou Springs Colorado Wine Festival at Memorial Park, Manitou Ave. 502, takes place daily in two sessions: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on August 28 and 29. Prepaid general admission is $ 35. Free for designated drivers. Live music, food trucks and gift items. visit tinyurl.com/yjwwh5us.

Contact the author: 636-0271.

Contact the author: 636-0271.

Colorado Springs space leisure occasions beginning July 1 | Arts & Leisure

THURSDAY

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Dave Day and Route 61, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/ paintthetownblue.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Hickabee, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

The Brad Eastin Quintet — 7 p.m., The Gold Room, 18 S. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: 634-4653, goldroomlive.com.

Super Clang — With The Short T.E.R.M, The Flower Gospel, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Habitual Offenders with Tracy Kellett — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

THURSDAY-FRIDAY

The Bellamy Brothers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$99. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

FRIDAY

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 101st Army Band, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Kailani Dobson — 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 p.m., GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100; gocadigital.org.

Snake and the Rabbit — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theareworks, 6 p.m., 112 E. Boulder St.; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Tovenaar — With Upon a Fields Whisper, Clarion Void, Kalakuta, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Figure — With Jeanie, Dub, Underground Sounds, 7 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25-$35. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Nico Coluucci — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY

Derrick Stroup — 7 and 9:30 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$65. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

Jozalyn Sharp — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 30

”Equilibrium” — Works by Shannon Mello, opens 5-9 p.m. Friday, G44 Gallery, 121 E. Boulder St. Exhibit runs noon-5 p.m. Thursdays- Saturdays; g44gallery.com.

FRIDAY-JULY 31

”What We Did” — Opens 5-8 p.m. Friday, Cottonwood Center for the Arts, 427 E. Colorado Ave. Exhibit runs through July 31; cottonwoodcenterforthearts.com.

”Cheers! Drink Up! 2021” — Featuring drinkware made from clay, Commonwheel Artists Co-op, 102 Canon Ave., Manitou Springs; commonwheel.com/cheers-2021.

”Nature of Summer” — Works by Wendy Iaconis, Suzy Gardner and Kang Lee Sheppard, Arati Artists Gallery, 2425 W. Colorado Ave.; aratiartistsgallery.com.

JULY 2-AUG. 8

”Morning, Noon and Night in Garden of the Gods” — Laura Reilly Fine Art Gallery and Studio, 2522-A W. Colorado Ave.; 650-1427.

SATURDAY

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10 10:45 and 11:30 a.m., Hillside Community Center, 925 S. Institute St. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a– venue-2021.

Brut Fest — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $10. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Fighting the Phoenix — With The Endless Line, Arctic Origins, Lava Gato, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Dueling Pianos — 7 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$35. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

Boyd Sweeney — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

SUNDAY

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Soul School, 7-9:30 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

TUESDAY

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: String Orchestra — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradosprings philmusicians.com.

Idaho with Mute Forest — 8 p.m., Lulu’s Downstairs, 107 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs, $10. Tickets required: 424-7637, lulusdownstairs.com.

WEDNESDAY

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With Mississippi Mudders, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With The Mississippi Mudders, 6-8 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; 592-9541.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With John Wise and Tribe, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

WEDNESDAY-JULY 8

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Rico Southee, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 8

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Take 2 Blues and the Soulcasters, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

”Colorado Springs Then and Now” Photo Exhibit Opening Reception — 5:30-8:30 p.m., Library 21c, 1175 Chapel Hills Drive; 260-6637.

Country on the Courtyard Concert Series — With Triple Nickel, 6-9 p.m., Viewhouse, 7114 Campus Drive; 394-4137, viewhouse.com.

Trapt — With Acedon Franklin, Mindless Vitality, Matthew Hennis, The R Souls, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $20. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

Wheel of Doom with John Rumery — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $6. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

JULY 9

First & Main Town Center Concert Series — With 17th Avenue Allstars, 5-7 p.m., First & Main Town Center, 3302 Cinema Point; firstandmaintowncenter.com/events.

Leo and the Lark — 6-8 p.m., Buffalo Lodge Bicycle Resort, 2 El Paso Blvd.; 634-2851, bicycleresort.com.

Reminiscent Souls — With Suga Bear, 7 p.m., Stargazers Theatre, 10 S. Parkside Drive, $10. Tickets required: stargazerstheatre.com.

Sheep Sessions: He$h & More — 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $25. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Jazz in the Garden Concert Series — With Wayne Wilkinson Trio, 7 p.m., Grace and St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 601 N. Tejon St.; gssepiscopal.org.

Mike Van Arsdale — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 9-10

Jay Hollingsworth — 7 and 9:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Steve Sabo — 7:30 and 9:45 p.m., 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $20-$55. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

SofaKillers — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $25-$40. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 9-18

Jurassic Quest Drive Thru — The Broadmoor World Arena, 3185 Venetucci Blvd., starting at $49 per vehicle. Tickets required: 477-2100, worldarena.com.

JULY 9-AUG. 28

”An American Night’s Dream” — Presented by Campfire Theater, 6:30 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 205 W. Fontanero St. Audience will be let on hiking trails as part of the show, $20. Tickets required: campfiretheatertours.com.

JULY 10

Front Range Fables — Family theatre performance and hands-on art activities, 10, 10:44 and 11:30 a.m., Meadows Park, 1943 S. El Paso Ave. Registration required: 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

”A Midsummer Night’s Dream” — Presented by Theatreworks, 2 p.m., George Fellows Park, 5711 Tuckerman Drive; tinyurl.com/253dkesc.

Chris Webby — 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $25 and up. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshinestudioslive.com.

E.P.I.C. Concert and Film in the Park — 7 p.m., Acacia Park Bandshell, 115 E. Platte Ave., 634-5583, fac.coloradocollege.edu/events/city-as-a-venue-2021.

SemiFiction — With Stereo Ontario, The Sum Beaches, Emerson Bailey, Grimmly, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $10. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

Rhythm and the Rose — 8:30 p.m., The Wild Goose Meeting House, 401 N. Tejon St., $5; wildgoosemeetinghouse.com.

JULY 10-11

Life of Bach: A Musical Journey — With Colorado Springs’ Early Music Ensemble, Parish House Baroque, 7-8 p.m. July 10, 2:30-4 p.m. July 11, First Lutheran Church, 1515 N. Cascade Ave, $10-$20. Tickets required: parishhouse baroque.org.

JULY 11

Hickabee & Brandon Henderson Band — 6 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $10-$15. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

In the Whale — With Salt of Sanguine, Redbush, 7 p.m., The Black Sheep, 2106 E. Platte Ave., $15. Tickets required: blacksheeprocks.com.

JULY 12

Gemini Syndrome — With A Killers Confession, Ovtlier, Pushing Veronica, 6 p.m., Sunshine Studios Live, 3970 Clearview Frontage Road, $15. Tickets required: 392-8921, sunshine studioslive.com.

Summer Concert Series — By Friends of Monument Park with New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 7 p.m., Monument Valley Park, 170 W. Cache La Poudre St.; fmvp.net.

JULY 13

Classic Tuesdays Concert Series: Brass Band — Featuring musicians of the Colorado Springs Philharmonic, 6-7 p.m., Bancroft Park, 2408 W. Colorado Ave.; coloradospringsphilmusicians.com.

JULY 14

Summer Concerts in the Glen — With The Mitguards, 6-7:15 p.m., The Glen at Broadmoor Community Church, 315 Lake Ave.; broadmoorchurch.org.

Pikes Peak Jazz and Swing Society’s Jazz in the Parks Series — With New Horizons “Kicks” Band, 6-8 p.m., Bear Creek Regional Park, 21st Street and Argus Boulevard; 592-9541.

Sunset Patio Sessions — Featuring Professor M, 6-8 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13701 Bass Pro Drive; 401-0600, bootbarnhall.com.

Hillside Gardens Summer Concert Series — With Playing with Smoke, 6-8:30 p.m., Hillside Gardens, 1006 S. Institute St., $10; 520-9463.

JULY 15

Paint the Town Blues Series — With Eef and the Blues Express, 5:30-7:30 p.m., Thorndale Park, 2310 W. Uintah St.; pikespeakblues.org/paintthetownblue.

Banning Lewis Ranch Summer Concert Series — With Collective Groove, 6-8 p.m., Banning Lewis Ranch Recreation Center, 6885 Vista Del Pico Blvd.; 522-2432.

Black Forest Summer Jazz Series — With New Horizons “Kick” Band, 6:30-8 p.m., Black Forest Community Club, 12530 Black Forest Road, Black Forest; bfcommunityclub.org.

Front Range Big Band — 7-8 p.m., Soda Springs Park, 1016 Manitou Ave., Manitou Springs; 494-3746.

You Look Like with Jonny & Brian — 7:30 p.m., Loonees Comedy Corner, 1305 N. Academy Blvd., $8. Tickets required: looneescc.com.

Little Texas — 7:30 p.m., Boot Barn Hall at Bourbon Brothers, 13071 Bass Pro Drive, $49-$55. Tickets required: bootbarnhall.com.

JULY 15-17

Jeremy Piven — 7 p.m. July 15, 7 and 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 3E’s Comedy Club, 1 S. Nevada Ave., $35-$90. Tickets required: 3escomedy.com.

JULY 15-18

”Paranormal Cirque” — 7:30 p.m. July 15-16, 9:30 p.m. July 16-17, 6:30 p.m. 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. July 18, The Citadel Mall, 750 Citadel Drive East, $10-$50. Tickets required: tinyurl.com/ 2y7m3vbs.

JULY 15-AUG. 1

”Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill” — Shockley-Zalabak Theater, 5225 N. Nevada Ave., $15 and up. Tickets required: 255-3232, entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH JULY 24

”The Space(s) Between” Exhibit — GOCA Ent Center for the Arts, 5225 N. Nevada Ave. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 6

”U OK?” Exhibit — GOCA Downtown, 121 S. Tejon St, Suite 100. Tickets required: entcenterforthearts.org.

THROUGH AUG. 7

Papel Chicano Dos: Works on Paper from the Collection of Cheech Marin — 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH AUG. 21

”To Bind or to Burn” — Works by Anna Tsouhlarakis, Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $10. Tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu.

THROUGH SEPT. 2

Sack Lunch Serenade Shows — Free silent films accompanied by the Mighty Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ, noon-1 p.m. Thursdays, Immanuel Organ Gym, 828 E. Pikes Peak Ave., $6 lunches available; 473-2010.

THROUGH SEPT. 4

Eugène Atget: “Photographing Paris, 1898-1925” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/exhibits/eugene– atget-photographing-paris.

”Ansel Adams: Masterworks” — Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College, 30 W. Dale St., $5-$10 for nonmembers. Advance tickets required: fac.coloradocollege.edu/ exhibits/ansel-adams-masterworks.

THROUGH OCT. 2

”Honesty Always Wins … or … This Mine is Mine” — Melodrama dinner theater, The Iron Springs Chateau, 444 Ruxton Ave., Manitou Springs. Go online for costs. Reservations required: ironspringschateau.com.

COMPILED BY CARLOTTA OLSON, THE GAZETTE, 636-0221, CARLOTTA.OLSON@GAZETTE.COM

July First Saturday | Arts & leisure

July is here, and the Downtown Frederick Partnership is celebrating July 3rd across downtown Frederick with First Saturday.

Check out the fun entertainment in town, listen to a few notes from local musicians, and head to your favorite shops and restaurants, many of which are open.

There is live music on this first Saturday in the city center from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. The music includes original, local lyrics paired with acoustic instruments, a duo with a contemporary violin, a brass band, and more.

Canines on the Creek runs from 3pm to 5pm at Carroll Creek Linear Park

The first Saturday offers nightly shopping hours, gallery openings and restaurants.

Remember to follow each company’s face-covering guidelines and, if possible, keep a minimum distance of two meters from other people who are not in your direct household.

Andy Dick arrested after reported chair assault in Hollywood | Arts & Leisure

Andy Dick was arrested Saturday after reportedly attacking another man with a chair, according to prison records.

Comedian’s girlfriend Elisa Jordana said Dick hit a man named Lucas with a metal chair. Dick has an adult son named Lucas, but it is unclear whether he was the victim.

“It was bad. It wasn’t good. He could have killed him,” Jordana said on her YouTube show.

Los Angeles County Prison records confirm that Dick, 55, was arrested in Hollywood on Saturday afternoon and released on bail early Tuesday morning. Jordana said the deposit was $ 50,000 but added that she was not interested in paying it.

On her show, Jordana described Dick as recently struggling with drug and alcohol abuse. She said he was evicted from his apartment and at one point asked her for $ 87 to pay for lunch.

Dick has faced multiple sexual assault charges in the past and was fired from the film “Raising Buchanan” in 2017 after several allegations were publicized.

In response, he said, “My middle name is ‘misconduct’. They know what they signed up for. ”But later in the same interview he said,“ I wasn’t groping anyone. ”

According to online records, he will be on trial again on October 25 for the alleged stool attack.

© 2021 New York Daily News. Visit at nydailynews.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Better of Teller 2021: Hidden Gems – Arts, Leisure & Recreation | Pikes Peak Courier

NEW PLACE TO HANG

Reserve our gallery

400 W. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. 719-401-2301, reserveourgallery.com

There are many wondrous moments in the Reserve Our Gallery in Woodland Park. Opened by Gayle Gross in spring 2021, the gallery is an artistic adventure with local artists as tour guides.

The journey can be through the Garden of the Gods, along rivers, lakes and forests, with each painting glorifying the beauty of Colorado. Gross designed the gallery with eye-catching groups. In one corner she has paired murals by Amy Spring with similar forest scenes by Denise Nelson.

In addition to paintings, the gallery shows ceramics, jewelry and mixed media works. In a very short time, Gross has turned her gallery into a community meeting place. “People say they feel good here, relaxed and peaceful with the art and music,” she said.

– Pat Hill

Fall in love again (with art)

Cripple Creek Art Alliance

facebook.com/CrippleCreekArtAlliance. Events at Cripple Creek Heritage Center, 9283 S. Colorado 67, Cripple Creek, 719-689-3315, colorado.com/history-museums/cripple-creek-heritage-center

As we are moving into a new normal after a multi-year pandemic, the Cripple Creek Art Alliance has one piece of advice: try art again – in person. The group is made up of artists in the Pikes Peak area but focuses on artwork in the Cripple Creek area, especially at many events at the Cripple Creek Heritage Center. The work includes drawing, watercolor, acrylic jewelry, ceramics, and photography. The Alliance held their first Memorial Day Art Show to announce that personal art is back. It previously hosted art exhibitions on Facebook and even hosted online art sales.

– Chhun sun.