BOB WEST ON GOLF — FedEx playoffs underscore PGA Tour cash machine – Port Arthur Information

How dramatically the money to be won on the PGA Tour escalates, not least thanks to Tiger Woods’ influence on the game, is always an exciting topic. Therefore, on the eve of the cash cow at the end of the tour’s season – the FedEx Cup Playoffs – this is an ideal time to dive back into the riches.

As a baseline, let’s toss some numbers on Jack Nicklaus, who is either number 1 or number 1A when it comes to being the greatest in golf. Nicklaus’ career earnings were $ 5.7 million. In his biggest season, 1972, he won seven times for a “whopping” $ 317,000.

The Golden Bear is at 18. His wins at the largest and most prestigious golf events grossed $ 784,500.

Those numbers are pretty much the proverbial chicken feed, of course, compared to what’s at stake in the FedEx playoffs over the next three weeks. For example, the winner receives $ 15 million deposited into their bank account. Challengers also collect a king’s ransom.

The money is so ridiculous that the guy who finished 125th in this week’s playoff opener

For those who don’t remember, the 2007 FedEx Cup Playoffs were launched for a number of reasons, not the least of which was to send a strong signal for the PGA Tour, to send a strong signal to anyone with the idea of start a world tour to siphon off players. The tour participants saw the $$$ signs and started pinching themselves.

How lucrative were the playoffs for the FedEx Cup? When you consider Nicklaus’ career winnings of $ 5.7 million, numerous players have already topped that in the playoffs. Rory McIlroy is the leading playoff cash winner with a staggering $ 41.7 million. That’s almost eight times Nicklaus’s career record.

Dustin Johnson is not far behind McIlory at $ 40.4 million. Then comes Tiger with $ 39 million. From there it falls to Justin Thomas at $ 25.6 million and Justin Rose at $ 25.4 million. Eleven players are over $ 18 million. It’s like throwing monopoly money around, only it’s real.

Give your child a golf club today.

Speaking of money wins, let’s take a quick look at who won the most money this season. Colin Morikawa, the brightest of the young stars, was number one at $ 7,039,768. Jon Rahm was just behind at $ 6.8 million. Jordan Spieth at $ 6.4, Bryson DeChambeau at $ 6.3 and Louis Oosthuizen at $ 6.2 rounded out the top 5.

In total, 20 players raised over $ 4 million, 34 over $ 3 million, 61 over 2 million and an astonishing 124 over $ 1 million. Just as a reminder, for winning 18 majors, Nicklaus’ fortune grew by just $ 784,500.

CHIP SHOTS: Andrew Landry finished the 2020-21 PGA Tour season on a positive note and was spectacular at times. Landry opened and closed the Wyndham Classic with rounds of five under par 65, making 15 birdies in the process.

Unfortunately, the ex from Port Neches-Groves couldn’t be better than 72 in the middle two rounds and had to be content with a draw on 51st place. That was worth $ 15,564, bringing its official seasonal earnings to $ 594,200. Landry ranked 155th in cash and FedEx points.

Seven was the lucky number for Joe Gongora of Port Arthur on Friday the 13th. Gongora scored his 7th hole in one by sinking a pitching wedge on the 115-yard 7th hole at Babe Zaharias.

The shot was watched by Rufus Reyes, Larry Johnson and Aubrey Ward and helped that team tie the front at 3 under on Friday’s 2 ball. Also 3 under on the front was the foursome of Ron LaSalle, Bill Hanley, Larry Reece and George Adams.

The team of Bob West, Bob Luttrull, Don MacNeil and James Johnson won the back with minus 1. Closest to pin wins came Dwayne Morvant (# 2), Gongora (# 7), Dan Flood (# 12) and Morvant (# 15).

On Monday Senior Plus 3 Ball at Zaharias, former minor league baseball player Rusty Hicks scored his best ’70 ever to help his team score a sweep with minus 1 on each side. The team was rounded off by West, Ward and Richard Malone.

At the Super Saturday Senior 2 Ball in Zaharias, the team of Rick Pritchett, LaSalle, Brian Mirabella and Lonnie Mosley took the lead with minus 2. Ed Holley, Cap Hollier, John Jessen and Charles Perez’s foursome sat down on the back with minus 3.

The Wednesday DogFight at Babe Zaharias was played in an all-points-count format. The team of Hollier, Larry Johnson, Flood and Jake Selensky took first place with 30 points. One point behind in second place was the four of Earl Richard, Charles Leard, Brad Royer and Jimmy Schexnayder.

Closest to pin wins were Vercher (# 2, # 7), Larry Stansbury (# 12) and Adam Noel (# 15).

At the Ball Zaharias 2 on Tuesday, August 10th, the team of Ted Freeman, Hollier, Art Turner and Glen Knight won the front with a minus 5.

Golf messages should be sent to rdwest@usa.net

Vidor quarterback Eli Simmons takes pleasure in Vidor’s bodily model of play – Port Arthur Information

VIDOR – Being a quarterback for the Vidor Pirates is different than playing under most programs under the center. In today’s game, quarterbacks typically throw at least 20 passes, with the high-end being around 50 per game.

At Vidor, the quarterback is asked to do a completely different job and would be lucky enough to throw 20 times in a season.

After playing the corner last season, Eli Simmons will take the lead for the Pirates and their triple option offensive this fall.

Eli Simmons, right, demonstrates a fake during Vidor’s summer practice. Chris Moore / The News

The pirates’ style of play regularly requires the quarterback to play the ball and play fakes that make him vulnerable. The triple option has a lot of backcourt movement to confuse the defense as to who has the ball. In the summer, the offense focuses on the counterfeiting of the forgeries and the exact timing of the rash attack.

“I’m going to be a completely different kind of player,” said Simmons. “I can block, run and throw. Other quarterbacks can step back and throw. Vidor quarterbacks have to go out and hit someone … I love it. People say we should throw more, but as Coach puts it, it will work. “

Vidor head coach Jeff Mathews said Simmons has taken over the team’s summer training.

“He’s an incredible leader,” said Mathews. “He leads through what he says and through what he does. In practice, when we deliver our fakes we tell them to run to the hash and he’ll run 5 meters past it. Because he raises the bar, so do everyone else. “

The quarterback said leadership was always a given, but the change of position added gravity.

“Everyone looks at me differently as a quarterback,” he said. “I have to get louder. If I don’t say anything, most of the time nobody would do it. “

Simmons comes from a Vidor soccer family. His eldest brother played quarterback for the Pirates in 2013 and his other brother played fullback a few years ago.

“Since my older brother played quarterback in college, that’s been all I wanted to do,” said Simmons. “The coach finally gave me a chance so I hope I can follow in their footsteps.”

After finishing last season 2-3 in the district and finishing fourth in the playoffs, Simmons said he is ready for the Pirates to take a leap this year and win the district title and make his mark on the program. The quarterback is confident in his team’s ability to make a deep playoff push.

“I want to be a team leader and make sure I will be remembered in Vidor,” he said.